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Image from page 21 of "Perils of the deep : being an account of some of the remarkable shipwrecks and disasters at sea during the last hundred years" (1885) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 21 of "Perils of the deep : being an account of some of the remarkable shipwrecks and disasters at sea during the last hundred years" (1885)

Identifier: perilsofdeepbein00hoar

Title: Perils of the deep : being an account of some of the remarkable shipwrecks and disasters at sea during the last hundred years

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: Hoare, Edward N

Subjects: Shipwrecks

Publisher: London : Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

 

 

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prons—Tailoring extraordinary—Boat-building underdifficulties—Rescued after a year and ten months—Regretsat leaving ! The Aventure—Landing to procure water—The vessel wrecked—A snow-clad scene—Bird messengers—Constructing a boat—A fortnight of suspense. TheCape Packet—Eighteen months of imprisonment 319 CHAPTER IV. NATIVE HOSPITALITY. The St. Paul—A terrible banquet. The Alceste—An ambassador in danger—Despatch of boats to Batavia—Digging for water—Malay pirates—Plundering thewreck—A critical position—The look-out in the tree-top—The Ternate—Coolness and discipline. The Nisero—The first scare— Mountainous waves —Running ashore—Leaving the ship—John Chinaman interprets—Airy ac-commodation—Sufferings of the captives—Tedious nego-tiations—An escape attempted—Letters and supplies—The first death—Others follow—The graveyard—A wearymarch — Paying down the cash — On board H.M.S.Pegasus after ten months of captivity 355

 

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Lhs. Soacty forIrurwUng ChH$tzanJ&lc PERILS OF THE DEEP. PART I.CHAPTER I. FIRES. THE cry of Fire is ever a startling one. Withwhat sudden terror does it rouse the slumbererat midnight ? with what panic horror does it thrillthe crowd packed close together, it may be in somescene of amusement or revelry ? But most unutter-ably awful must be the warning shout when heard atsea! Here every circumstance of danger and horroris intensified. A ship is necessarily composed of themost inflammable materials, and once the flames takehold upon her, they seldom relax their grasp till, toovictorious, they are finally overwhelmed in the hostileelement, when the burnt-out skeleton sinks hissinginto darkness ! What a situation must it be to standa bewildered, awe-struck spectator of that last conflictbetween the opposing elements—to have to choosebetween the burning gulf that is opening at onesfeet and the cruel waters that rage and swell in thelurid glare, for a place of sepulture i 16 PERILS OFperilsofdeepbein00hoar

 

 

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