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Daspletosaurus torosus, a tyrannosaur from the late Cretaceous of North America at the Evolving Planet Exhibit at the Field Museum, Chicago, IL | by Dallas Krentzel
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Daspletosaurus torosus, a tyrannosaur from the late Cretaceous of North America at the Evolving Planet Exhibit at the Field Museum, Chicago, IL

Daspletosaurus is a tyrannosaurine tyrannosaurid, thus closely related to Tyrannosaurus rex, although occurring in North America much earlier, from around 77 to 74 million years ago in the late Cretaceous. Note that the skull of D. tororsus is much more gracile than that of T. rex*, with T. rex having a much deeper skull mesolaterally (from side to side) with much larger, more robust dentition. Also note that this specimen of D. torosus has some obvious bony bosses or protrusions above and slightly anterior to the eyes and the top of the rostrum has a rugose surface, likely indicating some sort of integumentary ornamentation, such as a crest, in life. This feature is actually very common in tyrannosaurs, particularly the more primitive and smaller tyrannosaurs such as Guanlong, which has an enormous bony crest, but evidence of crests can readily be seen in other advanced tyrannosaurines such as Alioramus, as well.

 

*See T. rex here: www.flickr.com/photos/31867959@N04/5748758970/

 

For more info see:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daspletosaurus

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guanlong

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alioramus

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Taken on February 17, 2012