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North Main Street, King House, William, 30 North Main Street, North Easton, MA, c 1870, info, Easton Historical Society | by Historical Images of Easton, Massachusetts, Bristo
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North Main Street, King House, William, 30 North Main Street, North Easton, MA, c 1870, info, Easton Historical Society

More information on this image is available at the Easton Historical Society in North Easton, MA

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The development by Oliver Ames and Sons Corporation of the factory and village land use in a rather organic manner with a mix work-related classes created an integrated geographic network. The housing on perimeter edge with factories and business affairs in the center creating the village concept in North Easton. Other important concepts were the Furnace Village Cemetery, Furnace Village Grammar School and the Furnace Village Store, which explains Furnace Village and other sections of Easton.

source: Massachusetts Historical Commission

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Mount Pleasant Area

A plan was envisioned as the first house was built by Barzillai King, born in 1787. Barzillai King made a dam in the creek which was a branch of the Dorchester Creek on the western side of North Main Street creating a pond. Barzillai owned most of the land between the creek and lots on the north side of Elm Street and the west side of North Main Street. Barzillai operated an awl factory on a branch of the Dorchester Creek that runs between Linden and Holmes streets. In 1812, the hill in the Mt. Pleasant area was surrounded by King Avenue, Linden Street, and Pleasant Street. Unlike the Ames family, William King's father, Barzillai King might not have built living space for his employees. On April 29, 1841, William King married Susannah Tisdale in Easton, daughter of Colonel Israel, and Ruth Harlow Tisdale. In 1850, residing in a three-unit apartment house were William, and his wife, Susan Tisdale King, with their daughter, Elsie King, not in this neighborhood. In his book in 1886, History of Easton, William L. Chaffin wrote, - For many years William King, in a small building west of his dwelling-house, has manufactured awls, and has added to this business the making of various kinds of cement and some other goods. – In 1853, William and Susan Tisdale King owned four buildings and forty-five acres. In 1855, the map of North Easton **Village noted William King’s factory as marked – awl factory – between North Main Street and the Easton Branch Railroad and north of Elm Street. In 1860, residing at 28 Linden Street were William, and his wife, Susan Tisdale King with their five children. In 1860, William King had four workers making twelve hundred shoes and boots worth thirty-three hundred dollars, and five employees making four thousand grosses of awls. On June 24, 1863, William King's father, Barzillai King passed away in Easton. In 1864, heirs of Barzillai King’s estate transferred part of some of his properties in the Mount Pleasant Area to William King's son, William King. The area of Mount Pleasant is located within Elm, Linden, Pleasant, and North Main Streets, and King Avenue. In 1871, the home of William and Susan Tisdale King was located at the corner of King Avenue and Linden Street, the part of Linden Street formerly known as King Avenue. In 1871, residing at 28 Linden Street were William, and his wife, Susan Tisdale King, with their children, Henry W., and Elsie King. Also, living in the King’s household were William King's brother, John Bradford, and his wife, Emily King, with their son, George Bird King, and a domestic servant, Margaret Mulhern. In 1880, William and Susan Tisdale King, owned three houses, two shops, three barns, a carriage house, and fifty-eight acres of land. By 1890, eight houses were added to the original plan, two at 16 and 18 North Main Street, and 11, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 20 Pleasant Street. William King sold these eight houses to factory workers.

source: Easton Historical Society

source: Massachusetts Historical Commission

source: Forging Ahead: The Ames Family of Easton, Massachusetts, Gregory J. Galer, 2002

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William King

In 1870, William, a peg, brad and awl manufacturer, and his wife, Susan T. King, with their daughter, Elsie H. King, and their son, Henry W. King, who, also, worked in the awl factory. Besides being a factory owner, William King was listed as a farmer owning fifty-nine acres of land in the business directories. In 1875, Henry W. King attended Bryant and Stratton College. In 1885, Henry W. King married Adella F. Randall in Easton. In 1899, William King passed away followed by his wife, Susan T. King, in 1903. In 1901, Henry W. King was a farm operative selling fresh vegetables, poultry, and fruit from his farm. Properties in the Mt. Pleasant neighborhood were owned by members of the family, William King, his son, Henry W. King, and his wife, Adella F. Randall King. In 1910, Henry, and his wife, Adella F. Randall King moved out of the Mount Pleasant area to Center Street. Residing on Center Street were Henry W., was doing odds jobs, and his wife, Adella F. Randall King, with their daughter, Doris L. King, an office stenographer. In 1911, a house built on the parcel at 15 King Avenue owned by Henry W., and Adella F. Randall King. While living on Center Street, the house at 15 King Avenue was rented out by Henry F., and Adella F. King until 1945. In 1945, Adella F. King sold 15 King Avenue to Manuel P., and Lena Perry. Manuel P. Perry worked at the Stedfast Rubber Company at 50 Oliver Street in Easton.

source; Massachusetts Historical Commission

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History of North Main Street Street below

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30 North Main Street

The William King House at 30 North Main Street was sold by William King's daughter, Elsie Hannah King Marshall to Joseph A., and Mary Garcia in 1908. Before 1870, one of two houses built next to each other on land previously owned by Barzillai King, on North Main Street, and a second house was built around 1919. The first house, built before 1870, was owned by William King which became known as 30 North Main Street. In 1896, William King transferred ownership of a 27,299 square foot parcel with its buildings to his daughter, Elsie Hannah King Marshall of Chelsea. William King sold the property with the notation that William King’s family be able to maintain the stream north of the property that powered his awl factory which was set back north of King Avenue, opposite Pleasant Street. On May 15, 1901, Nathaniel E. Chase married Bessie A. Marshall, in Chelsea, daughter of Joseph Howard, and Satire Roxana Marshall In 1860, Bessie’s father, Joseph Howard Marshall, working on the family farm, was residing at 150 Washington Street, at the end of Marshall Lane, with his parents, Joseph H., a farmer, and Satire Roxana Marshall, with his two brothers, Herbert C. doing carpentry work, and Edgar G. Marshall. In 1860, Elsie Hannah King was residing at 28 Linden Street with her parents, William, a trader, and Susan J. Tisdale King, with her two brothers, Henry William, and Howard Tisdale King, and three boarders, William Kennerly, a shoemaker, Jeremiah Kennerly, a shoemaker, and Margaret Mulhern, a domestic worker. On February 2, 1874, Joseph Howard Marshall married Elsie Hannah King in Easton, daughter of William and Susan J. Tisdale King. In 1880, residing at 19 King Avenue, were Joseph Howard, a meat market owner, and his wife, Elsie Hannah King Marshall, with their daughters, Maud L., and Bessie A. Marshall, and a domestic servant living in the household, Katie Johnson. In 1881, Joseph Howard Marshall operated the J. H. Marshall Market and Provisions located in the North Easton Village at One Center Street. Around 1890, Joseph Howard, and his wife, Elsie Hannah King Marshall, with their two daughters, Maud L., and Bessie A. Marshall, moved to Chelsea. In 1900, residing at 41 Addison Street in Chelsea, were Joseph Howard, a medicine manufacturer and distributor, and his wife, Elsie Hannah King Marshall, with their two daughters, Maud L., and Bessie A, Marshall. In 1899, William King passed away followed by his wife, Susan T. King in 1903. In 1908, William King's granddaughter, Elsie Hannah King Marshall sold 30 North Main Street to Joseph A., and Mary Garcia, with a notation about the keeping the stream clear as in an agreement stipulated by William King in 1896. In 1910, owning and residing at 30 North Main Street were Joseph A., a private family gardener, and his wife, Mary Garcia, with their two daughters, Maria, and Anna Garcia, and their four sons, Joaquin, a shoe shop worker, Francis, Anthony, a shoe shop worker, and Joseph Garcia, Jr., a shoe shop worker. In 1920, residing at 30 North Main Street were Joseph A., a shoe shop worker, and his wife, Mary Garcia, with their two daughters, Maria, and Anna Garcia, and their four sons, Joaquim, a shoe shop worker, Francis, Anthony, and Joseph Garcia, Jr. In 1930, residing at 30 North Main Street were Joseph A., a farm laborer, and his wife, Mary Garcia, with their two sons, Francis, and Anthony Garcia, a grocery salesman, and a boarder, Isabella Quintal. In 1940, renting on Washington Street were Joseph A., a farm laborer, and his wife, Mary Garcia, with a boarder, Isabella Quintal. In 1940, renting at 30 North Main Street were Arthur W., a rubber factory mill operator, and his wife, Mary A. Wood, with their daughter, Mary A. Wood, and their two sons, Robert A., and Lawrence A. Wood, and Arthur W. Wood's brother, Arthur R. Wood, a rubber factory helper. The property at 30 North Main Street stayed in the Garcia family until the 1950s.

source: Easton Historical Society

source; Massachusetts Historical Commission

source: Ancestry

source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886

source: Easton’s Neighborhoods, Edmund C. Hands, 1995

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North Main Street

In North Easton Village, was first laid out in 1744. It began a little south of Joseph Crossman's (now Thomas Randall's), passed between the gravel bank and the hill just west of it, came out where the road now runs east of Frederick Lothrop Ames' farm-house, kept through the Village, and was continued nearly to the Stoughton line just above the Solomon R. Foster place. Those residents who had houses on this street in 1744 were Joseph Crossman, at the east end; Eliphalet Leonard, near the Red Factory, where he had a forge; Samuel Randall, near the railroad bridge; John Randall, near the machine shop, Richard Williams, on the Unity Church location; James Stacy, at the now Simeon Randall place; and Daniel Manley, on the east side of the Sol, Foster Road, so called. In 1812 Main Street was straightened at its east end, and continued to the then new Stoughton Turnpike, this extension being continued in 1850 to the North Bridgewater (now Brockton) line. The Solomon Foster end has not fared well. Voted in 1744, voted again in 1772, it has had but little done to it. It is no longer a thoroughfare to Stoughton, and was in fact very early superseded in that respect by the other two roads to that town.

source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886

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North Main Street

According to local historian William Ladd Chaffin, Main Street was laid out in 1744 and had at that time at least seven dwellings on it. Its east end was straightened in 1812 and extended to what is now Washington Street, and in 1850 it was extended again to the Brockton (then North Bridgewater) town line. The road curves north at Lincoln Street and becomes North Main Street north of Elm Street. From the start it has been a mixed-use area of homes, businesses, and some factories. Much of the land north of Lincoln Street was owned by members of the Ames family, which built its world-renowned shovel factory complex on the east side of Main Street and several of the family’s earliest estates on the west side. The Oliver Ames and Sons company store and several tenements were located on the east side of Main Street south of Pond Street, and on family land on the east side the Ames Free Library and Oakes Ames Memorial Hall, designed for Frederick Lothrop Ames by his Harvard classmate Henry Hobson Richardson, were built in the early 1880's. Between the Rockery on the west where Lincoln, Barrows, Centre, and Main Streets meet and where Williams and Mechanic Streets intersect it on the east, Main Street, particularly its north side, is a commercial district.

source: Massachusetts Historical Commission

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Taken on December 4, 2012