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As I was sat in the garden today I noticed this little Wood Mouse scurrying across the back of the raised bed with half an apple that I had put out for the birds - (I have a store of windfalls from my apple tree) - so I managed a few shots of it feeding on the apple.

 

Published in the Northern Echo 30-03-2020.

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fave my images.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.[2] It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.[1] Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.[3]

We were sat beside our pond this afternoon and this little Wood Mouse came out from amongst the wildflower patch and scurried across and disappeared into our log pile.

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fave my images.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.[2] It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.[1] Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.[3]

This wee mouse seems to have forgotten it is nocturnal.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

Ratolí de bosc_Ratolí de rostoll

 

_DSC6610_NKD500_VallbonaMSolero

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

another shot of the adorable wee mouse we found in the Botanic gardens.

Mulot Sylvestre / Wood Mouse / Apodemus Sylvaticus

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My Nature Youtube Channel

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www.youtube.com/channel/UCsiq1meZwLEh6Du0Zk2iUOA/featured

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Thank you for your kind support, comments and favs!

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Merci pour votre soutien, vos commentaires et favoris!

As we were sat on a log in a wooded area, this little Wood Mouse came scurrying past us and paused just long enough for me to get this shot. They have very long tails - longer than their bodies!

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fav my images.

I layed on the floor and had to bring the focal length in as he got so close, this is a ground eye view of my first woodmouse

 

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

Beide Arten sind nur schwer voneinander zu unterscheiden.

Sie sind aber beide vorwiegend nachtaktiv und ernähren sich hauptsächlich von Samen (Eicheln, Bucheckern, Haselnüsse), Früchten, Knospen, grünen Pflanzenteilen und Insekten.

 

Lumix G9 mit Leica 100 - 400 mm (264 mm)

Exif: ISO 1250 - F 10 - 1/80 - Freihand

 

Fundort: Deutschland - OWL - NSG Rieselfelder Windel - 28.12.2020

I think this one has set up home in one of our log piles and is a regular visitor to the areas beneath the seed feeders where it benefits from the spillage.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

I photographed this in my Lincolnshire {UK} garden.

Also called Woodmouse This one didn’t seem to be bothered about me being so close.

The tiny, brown wood mouse is one of our most common rodents and is very likely to be found in the garden. It is similar to the house mouse, but has larger ears and eyes relative to its size.

 

The wood mouse is sometimes known as the long-tailed field mouse and is widespread; it is probably most common in woodland, rough grassland and gardens. It is mostly nocturnal and an agile climber. Wood mice will gather food stores of berries and seeds in the autumn, which they keep in underground burrows or sometimes in old birds' nests. Females have up to six litters a year of between four and eight young, and may even breed over winter if food is abundant.

 

The wood mouse is our commonest mouse and the one you are most likely to find in your garden. Because of this, it often falls prey to domestic cats, foxes and owls; in fact, tawny owls may not breed if wood mouse numbers are low as it restricts their diet.

 

The third species of mammal spotted during the last few days of 'gardenwatch'. This one was clearing up the mess made by the goldfinches under the sunflower seed feeders. Its pale underparts distinguish from its domestic cousin.

Spotted this juvenile in our garden feeding on the peanut pieces that had been dropped earlier by a Great Spotted Woodpecker.

This little mouse usually comes to visit us at dusk most evenings, but sadly when the light is poor so not as sharp as i would have liked!

Das winzige Ding saß heute zitternd bei uns auf dem Rasen.

(Apodemus sylvaticus)This was taken in my garden. The mice live under or near the bird feeders - the birds are so messy they leave lots of food for these little guys. I rarely see them though. This one was very brave - I was only about 6 feet away!

Wood Mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus)_w_3526

 

Despite being one of our most common woodland mammals, the small, sweet and secretive wood mouse is hard to spot. They feast on nuts, seeds and invertebrates and are an important food source for larger mammals and birds of prey.

 

What do wood mice look like?

 

Wood mice have brown fur with pale underparts, large black eyes, big ears and a long, hairless tail. Their bodies are around 10cm long.

 

Not to be confused with: house mice which are a greyer-brown and unlikely to be seen outside of buildings. Bank voles have noticeably smaller eyes and ears, as well as a shorter, hairy tail.

 

Dit muisje dacht de dans te ontspringen en glipte uit de melkbus ... helaas, moeder uil pikte haar even later uit het gras ... actie mislukt, 😢!

 

Samen met Judith bracht ik dit jaar een bezoek aan de steenuiltjes van Noctua Nature Hides in Barchem en wat was het de moeite waard, het was puur genieten!

 

Dank aan Hans en Cees voor hun inzet en zijn gastvrijheid! 👍

A wood mouse (brown with pale underparts rather than grey all over) joining the clean-up squad under the garden bird table.

 

Taken as an experiment to see how the EOS R worked with a long lens. Takes a while to get used to the delay through the viewfinder but it seems to deliver reasonable results.

Another image of the Wood Mouse that I photographed in our back garden eating one of my windfalls that I split in half for the birds.

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fave my images.

The brown fluff above the brown dirt. CUTE!

Mulot Sylvestre / Wood Mouse / Apodemus Sylvaticus

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What a surprising and funny time spent with this tiny Wood Mouse, which ran across the path on which I was walking, covered with fallen leaves!

To my surprise, he didn't see me when I stopped, and came back crunching just 3 meters from me.

I had time to get down to the ground, making me a big bruise on the knee (but these are the vagaries of photography :-) )

Just adorable!

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Quel moment surprenant et amusant passé avec ce Mulot minuscule, qui a traversé en courant le chemin sur lequel je marchais, couvert de feuilles mortes!

A ma grande surprise, il ne m'a pas vue lorsque je me suis arrêtée, et est revenu grignoter juste à 3 mètres de moi.

J'ai eu le temps de me mettre au sol, en me faisant d'ailleurs un beau bleu au genou (mais ce sont les aléas de la photo :-) )

Juste adorable!

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Thank you for your kind support, comments and favs!

---

My Nature Youtube Channel

Ma chaîne Youtube Nature

www.youtube.com/channel/UCsiq1meZwLEh6Du0Zk2iUOA/playlists

---

Merci pour votre soutien, vos commentaires et favoris!

 

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

  

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

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