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Yuk Tony, I don't think much to your sandwiches! lol

Waiting for me to move back so it can have the food I left.

Abandoned by parents in our garden, neighbour’s cat probably got them. I’m feeding him up ready for Winter !

Bank vole & wood mouse sharing the food in our garden.

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.[9] While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow.[12] Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.[2] It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.[1] Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.[3]

Aways trying to get something different from the norm,I have come across another mouse that as started stashing it’s food and covering them with any objects lying around the shed.Some of the screws they carry must be heavier than the mice.

Another image of the Wood Mouse that I photographed in our back garden eating one of my windfalls that I split in half for the birds.

 

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Wood mouse on the outskirts of Groeneveld forest in Heisdorf (Luxembourg) enjoying apple chips I gave her :)

We were sat beside our pond this afternoon and this little Wood Mouse came out from amongst the wildflower patch and scurried across and disappeared into our log pile.

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fave my images.

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.[2] It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.[1] Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.[3]

Several evenings this week I have been trying to photograph a leaping Wood mouse, this evening I managed to capture one in mid-air carrying a seed ... WIP.

Feeling cute, might poop in your kitchen cabinets later...

 

Wood Mouse facts

 

I post more pics on my tumblr.

 

↓↓↓↓Credits↓↓↓↓

[vaak] Pet Rat - My most cherished sl pet!! ♥

 

Gedeckter Tisch für das Waldmäuschen - Vogelfutter ist auch für Mäuse was Feines

The wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) is a murid rodent native to Europe and northwestern Africa. It is closely related to the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) but differs in that it has no band of yellow fur around the neck, has slightly smaller ears, and is usually slightly smaller overall: around 90 mm (3.54 in) in length and 23 g in weight.It is found across most of Europe and is a very common and widespread species, is commensal with people and is sometimes considered a pest.Other common names are long-tailed field mouse, field mouse, common field mouse, and European wood mouse.

 

Wood mice inhabit forests, grasslands, and cultivated fields, tending to seek out more wooded areas in winter. Almost entirely nocturnal and terrestrial, wood mice burrow extensively, build nests of plants and live in buildings during harsh seasons. It is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. The wood mouse is also found in northwestern Africa and on many Mediterranean islands.

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow. Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

 

The wood mouse has a breeding season from February to October in which multiple matings occur between males and females, resulting in scramble competition. Such behavioral characteristics result in sperm competition and multiple paternity litters. The society is polygynous with copulation resulting from scramble competition during reproductive periods. Males possess a sac known as the cauda epididymis, which stores sperm and lies underneath the scrotal protrusion. Temperature regulation ensures maximum sperm output.

This little mouse was in and out from under the log and it picked up dry leaves in its mouth and scurried back under the log with the make do bedding

 

Wood mice are mainly active during the dark, probably having evolved so to avoid predation, employing several anti-predatory strategies, though breeding females may be more active in daylight in order to collect sufficient food.[9] While foraging, wood mice pick up and distribute visually conspicuous objects, such as leaves and twigs, which they then use as landmarks during exploration.[10][11] If a wood mouse is caught by its tail, it can quickly shed the end of it, which may never regrow.[12] Despite its name, it prefers hedgerows to woodland. During the colder months, wood mice do not hibernate; however, during severe winter seasons they can fall into a torpid state, a decrease in physiological activity.

A small copse of trees, such as this, provides useful habitats for, fox, badger, wood mouse and hedgehog, whilst it's rotting timber and vegetation provide home and sustenace for a myriad of insects. It's trees provide home and shelter for squirrel and birds, and it is often visited by foraging wild deer.

The importance of copses cannot be over-emphasised, particularly in a landscape of intense agricultural farming.

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One of the lovely little wood mice we feed in the garden 💖

Eating some seeds we put out for it in Cornwall

For macro mondays 'made of wood'

 

This tiny mouse was made by a local wood turner and usually lives on one of our bookshelves, but it was time for a photo shoot out in the woods today :)

As I was sat in the garden today I noticed this little Wood Mouse scurrying across the back of the raised bed with half an apple that I had put out for the birds - (I have a store of windfalls from my apple tree) - so I managed a few shots of it feeding on the apple.

 

Published in the Northern Echo 30-03-2020.

 

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Last of the mice photos

This wee mouse seems to have forgotten it is nocturnal.

Portrait.

Scientific name: Accipitor nisus.

 

Chance encounter with a Sparrowhawk - I managed several lucky shots of this stunning bird of prey that suddenly appeared in the viewfinder whilst I sat in the car attempting to photograph a Wood Mouse.

 

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Wood Mouse in the garden, stocking up for winter

Wood Mouse collecting/storing food from under the bird feeders this morning

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