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"There's a morning when presence comes over your soul. You sing like a rooster in your earth-colored shape. Your heart hears and, no longer frantic, begins to dance."

- Rumi

 

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Thanks to all for 11,000.000+ views and kind comments ... !

Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

  

(Turdus philomelos) Heaven knows what the morsel is but it could be a snail!

Nikon D500, Sigma 60-600mm Sports lens, 600mm, f/8, 1/800, ISO 500. View Large.

Listen ... Doesn't their song sound beautiful? Can't you hear that? Close your eyes and let your imagination run wild .... you will also see butterflies fluttering in the rhythm of the music....🎵

what's in a name....

we can hear their beautiful song every day as well as those of their vocally less gifted relatives, the Mistle Thrush and the Common Blackbird. All 3 thrush species are nesting in the area.

 

turdus philomelos

zanglijster

grive musicienne

Singdrossel

 

Many thanks for your views, favorites and supportive comments.

 

All rights reserved. ButsFons©2020

Please do not use my photos on websites, blogs or in any other media without my explicit permission.

Nikon D500, Sigma 60-600mm Sports lens, 600mm, f/8, 1/640, ISO 280. View Large.

"In summer the song sings itself".

William Calos Williams

Song Thrush - Turdus Philomelos

  

The song thrush (Turdus philomelos) is a thrush that breeds across much of Eurasia. It has brown upperparts and black-spotted cream or buff underparts and has three recognised subspecies. Its distinctive song, which has repeated musical phrases, has frequently been referred to in poetry.

 

The song thrush breeds in forests, gardens and parks, and is partially migratory with many birds wintering in southern Europe, North Africa and the Middle East; it has also been introduced into New Zealand and Australia. Although it is not threatened globally, there have been serious population declines in parts of Europe, possibly due to changes in farming practices.

 

The song thrush builds a neat mud-lined cup nest in a bush or tree and lays four to five dark-spotted blue eggs. It is omnivorous and has the habit of using a favourite stone as an "anvil" on which to break open the shells of snails. Like other perching birds (passerines), it is affected by external and internal parasites and is vulnerable to predation by cats and birds of prey.

 

The song thrush has an extensive range, estimated at 10 million square kilometres (3.8 million square miles), and a large population, with an estimated 40 to 71 million individuals in Europe alone.

 

In the western Palaearctic, there is evidence of population decline, but at a level below the threshold required for global conservation concern (i.e., a reduction in numbers of more than 30% in ten years or three generations) and the IUCN Red List categorises this species as of "Least Concern". In Great Britain and the Netherlands, there has been a more than 50% decline in population, and the song thrush is included in regional Red Lists. The decreases are greatest in farmlands (73% since the mid-1970s) and believed to be due to changes in agricultural practices in recent decades.

 

The precise reasons for the decline are not known but may be related to the loss of hedgerows, a move to sowing crops in autumn rather than spring, and possibly the increased use of pesticides. These changes may have reduced the availability of food and of nest sites. In gardens, the use of poison bait to control slugs and snails may pose a threat. In urban areas, some thrushes are killed while using the hard surface of roads to smash snails.

 

Many Poets and Writers have referenced the Song Thrush, here is one example:

 

In The Tables Turned, Romantic poet William Wordsworth references the song thrush, writing

Hark, how blithe the throstle sings

And he is no mean preacher

Come forth into the light of things

Let Nature be your teacher

 

The song thrush is the emblem of West Bromwich Albion Football Club, chosen because the public house in which the team used to change kept a pet thrush in a cage. It also gave rise to Albion's early nickname, The Throstles.

 

Song Thrush - Turdus philomelos

 

The song thrush breeds in forests, gardens and parks, and is partially migratory with many birds wintering in southern Europe, North Africa and the Middle East; it has also been introduced into New Zealand and Australia. Although it is not threatened globally, there have been serious population declines in parts of Europe, possibly due to changes in farming practices.

 

The song thrush builds a neat mud-lined cup nest in a bush or tree and lays four to five dark-spotted blue eggs. It is omnivorous and has the habit of using a favourite stone as an "anvil" on which to break open the shells of snails. Like other perching birds (passerines), it is affected by external and internal parasites and is vulnerable to predation by cats and birds of prey.

In intensively farmed areas where agricultural practices appear to have made cropped land unsuitable, gardens are an important breeding habitat. In one English study, only 3.5% of territories were found in farmland, whereas gardens held 71.5% of the territories, despite that habitat making up only 2% of the total area. The remaining nests were in woodlands (1% of total area).

 

The winter habitat is similar to that used for breeding, except that high ground and other exposed localities are avoided; however, the island subspecies T. p. hebridensis will frequent the seashore in winter.

 

Population:

 

UK breeding:

1,200,000 territories

  

Taken Stour Valley Nature Reserve, Bournemouth, Dorset

The early morning is filled with song from songbirds. This common House Finch pitches in.

Many thanks to everyone that views and comments on my images - very much appreciated.

Song Thrush - Turdus Philomelos

 

Featured on BBC Springwatch Social Media sites Dec 29 2019

 

The song thrush (Turdus philomelos) is a thrush that breeds across much of Eurasia. It has brown upperparts and black-spotted cream or buff underparts and has three recognised subspecies. Its distinctive song, which has repeated musical phrases, has frequently been referred to in poetry.

 

The song thrush breeds in forests, gardens and parks, and is partially migratory with many birds wintering in southern Europe, North Africa and the Middle East; it has also been introduced into New Zealand and Australia. Although it is not threatened globally, there have been serious population declines in parts of Europe, possibly due to changes in farming practices.

 

The song thrush builds a neat mud-lined cup nest in a bush or tree and lays four to five dark-spotted blue eggs. It is omnivorous and has the habit of using a favourite stone as an "anvil" on which to break open the shells of snails. Like other perching birds (passerines), it is affected by external and internal parasites and is vulnerable to predation by cats and birds of prey.

The song thrush has an extensive range, estimated at 10 million square kilometres (3.8 million square miles), and a large population, with an estimated 40 to 71 million individuals in Europe alone.

 

In the western Palaearctic, there is evidence of population decline, but at a level below the threshold required for global conservation concern (i.e., a reduction in numbers of more than 30% in ten years or three generations) and the IUCN Red List categorises this species as of "Least Concern". In Great Britain and the Netherlands, there has been a more than 50% decline in population, and the song thrush is included in regional Red Lists. The decreases are greatest in farmlands (73% since the mid-1970s) and believed to be due to changes in agricultural practices in recent decades.

The precise reasons for the decline are not known but may be related to the loss of hedgerows, a move to sowing crops in autumn rather than spring, and possibly the increased use of pesticides. These changes may have reduced the availability of food and of nest sites. In gardens, the use of poison bait to control slugs and snails may pose a threat. In urban areas, some thrushes are killed while using the hard surface of roads to smash snails.

 

Many Poets and Writers have referenced the Song Thrush, here is one example:

 

In The Tables Turned, Romantic poet William Wordsworth references the song thrush, writing

 

Hark, how blithe the throstle sings

And he is no mean preacher

Come forth into the light of things

Let Nature be your teacher

 

The song thrush is the emblem of West Bromwich Albion Football Club, chosen because the public house in which the team used to change kept a pet thrush in a cage. It also gave rise to Albion's early nickname, The Throstles.

   

Seems like, if no other bird is around, I can always find a cooperative song sparrow!

Song Thrush - Turdus Philomelos

  

The song thrush (Turdus philomelos) is a thrush that breeds across much of Eurasia. It has brown upperparts and black-spotted cream or buff underparts and has three recognised subspecies. Its distinctive song, which has repeated musical phrases, has frequently been referred to in poetry.

 

The song thrush breeds in forests, gardens and parks, and is partially migratory with many birds wintering in southern Europe, North Africa and the Middle East; it has also been introduced into New Zealand and Australia. Although it is not threatened globally, there have been serious population declines in parts of Europe, possibly due to changes in farming practices.

 

The song thrush builds a neat mud-lined cup nest in a bush or tree and lays four to five dark-spotted blue eggs. It is omnivorous and has the habit of using a favourite stone as an "anvil" on which to break open the shells of snails. Like other perching birds (passerines), it is affected by external and internal parasites and is vulnerable to predation by cats and birds of prey.

 

The song thrush has an extensive range, estimated at 10 million square kilometres (3.8 million square miles), and a large population, with an estimated 40 to 71 million individuals in Europe alone.

 

In the western Palaearctic, there is evidence of population decline, but at a level below the threshold required for global conservation concern (i.e., a reduction in numbers of more than 30% in ten years or three generations) and the IUCN Red List categorises this species as of "Least Concern". In Great Britain and the Netherlands, there has been a more than 50% decline in population, and the song thrush is included in regional Red Lists. The decreases are greatest in farmlands (73% since the mid-1970s) and believed to be due to changes in agricultural practices in recent decades.

 

The precise reasons for the decline are not known but may be related to the loss of hedgerows, a move to sowing crops in autumn rather than spring, and possibly the increased use of pesticides. These changes may have reduced the availability of food and of nest sites. In gardens, the use of poison bait to control slugs and snails may pose a threat. In urban areas, some thrushes are killed while using the hard surface of roads to smash snails.

 

Many Poets and Writers have referenced the Song Thrush, here is one example:

 

In The Tables Turned, Romantic poet William Wordsworth references the song thrush, writing

 

Hark, how blithe the throstle sings

And he is no mean preacher

Come forth into the light of things

Let Nature be your teacher

 

The song thrush is the emblem of West Bromwich Albion Football Club, chosen because the public house in which the team used to change kept a pet thrush in a cage. It also gave rise to Albion's early nickname, The Throstles.

 

Your song

 

Love you Mr jones ♥

 

It's a little bit funny, this feeling inside

I'm not one of those who can easily hide

I don't have much money, but boy if I did

I'd buy a big house where we both could live

 

If I was a sculptor, but then again, no

Or a man who makes potions in a traveling show

I know it's not much, but it's the best I can do

My gift is my song, and this one's for you

 

And you can tell everybody this is your song

It may be quite simple, but now that it's done

I hope you don't mind, I hope you don't mind that I put down in words

How wonderful life is while you're in the world

 

I sat on the roof and kicked off the moss

Well, a few of the verses, well, they've got me quite cross

But the sun's been quite kind while I wrote this song

It's for people like you that keep it turned on

 

So excuse me forgetting, but these things I do

You see I've forgotten if they're green or they're blue

Anyway the thing is what I really mean

Yours are the sweetest eyes I've ever seen

 

And you can tell everybody this is your song

It may be quite simple, but now that it's done

I hope you don't mind, I hope you don't mind that I put down in words

How wonderful life is while you're in the world

 

I hope you don't mind, I hope you don't mind that I put down in words

How wonderful life is while you're in the world

  

Taken Stour Valley Nature Reserve, Bournemouth, Dorset.

The early bird gets the worm or in this case a caterpillar. A classic spotted thrush with a vibrant, varied, full-throated song that is always identifiable. Sadly a declining bird in some areas in the UK.

MLK Jr Regional Shoreline, Oakland, CA

Salal Cove, Sea Ranch, CA

Looking through older pictures today, and found this treasure among them.

Found this song sparrow singing in this bush with fall berries adding color.

Song Thrushes are both resident and migratory. Some birds, especially in northern populations, migrate southwards in the autumn, with southern populations going as far as France, Spain and Portugal. In the winter, the remaining British population is often joined by slightly darker immigrants from Scandinavia

 

The Song Thrust repeats its self 3 or 4 times.

youtu.be/i4zZNlIQEb0

 

(S) (C)

To Srki and Danka .

 

A CRADLE SONG

 

Sweet dreams,

form a shade

 

O’er my lovely infant’s

head

 

Sweet dreams

of pleasant streams

 

By happy,

silent,

 

moony

beams.

 

Sweet Sleep,

with soft down

 

Weave thy brows

an infant crown.

 

Sweet Sleep,

Angel mild,

 

Hover o’er

my little child.

 

Sweet smiles,

in the night

 

Hover over

my delight;

 

Sweet smiles

 

mother’s smiles,

 

All the livelong

night beguiles.

 

Sweet moans,

 

dovelike

sighs,

 

Chase not slumber

from thy eyes.

 

Sweet moans,

sweeter smiles,

 

All the dovelike moans

beguiles.

 

Sleep, sleep,

little child,

 

All creation slept

and smil'd .

 

Sleep,

sleep,

happy sleep,

 

While o’er thee

thy mother weep.

 

Sweet babe,

in thy face

 

Holy image I can trace.

 

Sweet babe,

once like thee,

 

Thy Maker lay

and

 

Wept

for me,

 

Wept

 

for me,

 

for thee,

 

for all,

 

When He was

an infant small.

 

Thou His image

ever see,

 

Heavenly face

that smiles

 

on

thee .

 

Smiles

 

on

thee,

 

on

me,

 

on

all

 

Who became

an infant

 

small.

 

Infant smiles

are

 

His own smiles

 

Heaven and earth

 

to peace

 

beguiles.

 

WILLIAM BLAKE

 

[ pastell expressionism _ william turner meeting caspar david friedrich ]

 

youtu.be/NJVxEaGrHS4

youtu.be/C68y8pSX3FI

youtu.be/nKj1iK2WKS8

  

I am , as ever , profoundly grateful to all for kindness expressed herein & shall be looking forward very much to diving in your so inspiring streams of imaginative creativity in the forthcoming weeks .

 

science.orf.at/stories/3202277

 

This song sparrow posed on the same day as the kinglets and chickadee, with the wind ruffling its feathers a bit.

... a song for all women

 

The Tune ~ Sing The Water Song

 

This song was written by Irene Wawatie Jerome for Grandfather William Commanda's 2002 Circle of All Nations gathering. It is recorded with permission from the Wawatie and Commanda families and the Circle of All Nations Foundation and the Elders in Canada.

 

This Algonquin Water Song expresses loving gratitude for the water and raises the consciousness and connection of women with Mother Nature’s greatest gift. The song is easy to learn, and our hope is that millions of women will sing it, raising their own connection and awareness of the water they interact with daily even in the shower or at the sink. Sing it 4 times, facing each of the 4 Directions. We believe this is a powerful step to change, leading to both a spiritual as well as environmental shift on our planet.

The cold weather last weekend brought Redwings, Mistle Thrushes and Song Thrushes to my garden, all of them rare visitors. I put out plenty of fruit on the floor and set up a hide that I could lie down in to get some low POV images. Unfortunately the Redwings stayed in the undergrowth but this Song Thrush was happy to hop around in the open.

"Message in a Bottle" by the Police

 

Just a cast away, an island lost at sea, oh

Another lonely day, no one here but me, oh

More loneliness than any man could bear

Rescue me before I fall into despair, oh

 

I'll send an SOS to the world

I'll send an SOS to the world

I hope that someone gets my

I hope that someone gets my

I hope that someone gets my message in a bottle, yeah

Message in a bottle, yeah

Do you feel me?

Do you hear me?

Do you see me?

The dawn is coming ...

Do you need me?

Do you fear me?

Do you know me?

Stand beside me!

I feel the sun on my face

I hear the song of the wind

I walk in the light of grace

I see the beauty within

I release the pain on the way

I embrace the rain on my body

I know the time & the place

Stand on the earth that spinning in space

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=VREgcdSKe20&list=FLKg4TkMYJSW...

Lake Chabot Regional Park. Castro Valley, Fremont.

I could hear three Song Sparrows singing from the reeds and small trees around the edge of the pond. This one flew to an open, sunny perch, and gave me a lovely euphonious recital.

 

Hermitage Park. Edmonton, Alberta.

The sweet song of the Song Sparrow rang out over the marsh at Lake St. Clair Metropark in southeast Michigan.

eXplosion

Black Eyed Peas & Anitta

 

Image of a Song Thrush taken from a woodland hide in the Hortobagy region of Hungary.

 

Many thanks to everyone that views and comments on my images - much appreciated.

The song thrush (Turdus philomelos) is a thrush that breeds across the West Palearctic. It has brown upper-parts and black-spotted cream or buff underparts and has three recognised subspecies. Its distinctive song, which has repeated musical phrases, has frequently been referred to in poetry.

Photographed along Highway 12 (White Pass Highway), Yakima County, Washington. IMG_3089

Song Thrushes are both resident and migratory. Some birds, especially in northern populations, migrate southwards in the autumn, with southern populations going as far as France, Spain and Portugal. In the winter, the remaining British population is often joined by slightly darker immigrants from Scandinavia and BENELUX.

 

(S) (C)

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