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Rocky Mountain Oysters are small bites of bison testicles battered and fried to a golden brown and served with a tangy "cocktail" sauce.

 

Rocky Mountain oysters, also known as prairie oysters, are a North American name for edible delicacy made of peeled buffalo or bull testicles, coated in flour, pepper and salt, sometimes pounded flat, then deep-fried. In Oklahoma and North Texas, they are sometimes called calf fries but only if taken from very young bulls. In Spain and many parts of Mexico they are referred to as "criadillas" and are colloquially referred to as huevos del toro (literally, "bull’s eggs" but huevos is also a Spanish slang term for testicles) in Central and South America. A few other descriptive terms, such as "cowboy caviar," "Montana tendergroins," or "swinging beef," may be used.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

Rocky Mountain Oysters are small bites of bison testicles battered and fried to a golden brown and served with a tangy "cocktail" sauce.

 

Rocky Mountain oysters, also known as prairie oysters, are a North American name for edible delicacy made of peeled buffalo or bull testicles, coated in flour, pepper and salt, sometimes pounded flat, then deep-fried. In Oklahoma and North Texas, they are sometimes called calf fries but only if taken from very young bulls. In Spain and many parts of Mexico they are referred to as "criadillas" and are colloquially referred to as huevos del toro (literally, "bull’s eggs" but huevos is also a Spanish slang term for testicles) in Central and South America. A few other descriptive terms, such as "cowboy caviar," "Montana tendergroins," or "swinging beef," may be used.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The 23rd G8 Summit, then known as the Summit of Eight, was held in Denver, Colorado at the Denver Public Library from June 20-22, 1997. President Bill Clinton hosted the other seven leaders, including Tony Blair, Boris Yeltsin, Ryutaro Hashimoto, Jacques Chirac, Romano Prodi, Jean Chrétien, and Helmut Kohl, at the Fort on June 21, 1997.

  

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

Trade Whiskey, one of The Fort's Fur Trade Potables, is a historic old western fur trade recipe. The concoction consists of a fine bourbon flavored with red pepper, tobacco and black gun powder, served neat.

 

Although it was a common practice to substantially dilute alcohol or whiskey at the destination, tales of a so-called trade whiskey at fur trading posts is a myth. The story usually goes that trade whiskey was created to make up for "losses" which occured while pack skinners hauled the whiskey up the mountains from either Taos or St. Louis. What is now referred to as trade whiskey did exist, but not until the post Civil War period. Recipes varied by region and including ingredients like red pepper, chewing topacco, molasses, river water, gun powder and rattlesnake heads. The tobacco was usually used to give trade whiskey an amber color--a concept that didn't exist until the 1840's when all distilled alcohol was colorless.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort's Game Plate, the most popular dish at the restaurant, includes an elk chop, a buffalo filet medallion and a grilled teriyaki quail, served with Fort potatoes and seasonal vegetables.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

Trade Whiskey, one of The Fort's Fur Trade Potables, is a historic old western fur trade recipe. The concoction consists of a fine bourbon flavored with red pepper, tobacco and black gun powder, served neat.

 

Although it was a common practice to substantially dilute alcohol or whiskey at the destination, tales of a so-called trade whiskey at fur trading posts is a myth. The story usually goes that trade whiskey was created to make up for "losses" which occured while pack skinners hauled the whiskey up the mountains from either Taos or St. Louis. What is now referred to as trade whiskey did exist, but not until the post Civil War period. Recipes varied by region and including ingredients like red pepper, chewing topacco, molasses, river water, gun powder and rattlesnake heads. The tobacco was usually used to give trade whiskey an amber color--a concept that didn't exist until the 1840's when all distilled alcohol was colorless.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort's Game Plate, the most popular dish at the restaurant, includes an elk chop, a buffalo filet medallion and a grilled teriyaki quail, served with Fort potatoes and seasonal vegetables.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort's version of Scottish eggs, Bison Eggs, are pickled quail eggs wrapped in house made buffalo sausage and fried in panko bread crumbs, served with a

raspberry-jalapeno jam.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort's version of Scottish eggs, Bison Eggs, are pickled quail eggs wrapped in house made buffalo sausage and fried in panko bread crumbs, served with a

raspberry-jalapeno jam.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

The original Bill of Fare at the Fort featured rocky mountain oysters for $1.50 and Uncle Dick Wootton's Porterhouse Steak for $7.95.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

This cannon, a 6 pounder 1841 model on display at The Fort, has a range of 2 miles. It was fired on July 4th and New Years Eve when General Kearney's Army visited Bent's Fort in the summer of 1846 during the invasion of New Mexico. Bent's employees over-enthusiastically loaded too much poweder and blew their gun to bits.

  

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

Known as "Prairie Butter" to the early pioneers, roast bison marrow bones were Julia Child's favorite delicacy at The Fort.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)

Known as "Prairie Butter" to the early pioneers, roast bison marrow bones were Julia Child's favorite delicacy at The Fort.

 

The Fort, located at 19192 Highway 8 in Morrison, was opened in 1963 by Samuel and Elizabeth Arnold. The Arnolds hired William Lumpkins, the top architect in adobe construction from Santa Fe, to turn the red rock property they bought in 1961 into an adobe castle inspired by Bent's Fort. The restaurant has remained in the family, serving Early West specialties ever since.

 

Bent's Old Fort, located in Otero County, Colorado, was built in 1833 by William and Charles Bent to trade with Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Plains Indians and trappers for buffalo robes. For much of its 16-year history, the fort was the only major permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and the Mexican settlements. It was destroyed under mysterious circumstances in 1849.

 

National Register #06000585 (2006)