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Anahi: Bela flor do céu (Tupi-guarani)

 

Arte Digital - Digital Art

Image-editing

Effects - Texture

Software: Pixlr; Windows, PicsArt Photo Studio

 

Comunidade Indígena Aldeia Cipiá

Praia do Tupé

Rio Negro - Amazônia

  

Piratininga - Niterói.

 

The top of the Astronomical Clock Tower, Prague.

 

The higher the position, the more you can discover@

Museu Nacional de Belas Artes

(MNBA)

Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

Art Week Gallery Group: Creative Classics

12/07/2019

Manipulated image of photos taken from works exhibited in the Gallery of Moldings of the National Museum of Fine Arts

The two Molding Galleries are home to over 150 plaster works. This magnificent collection consists of pieces molded on originals from the Hellenistic, Roman, and classical Greek period (the so-called Golden Age). Most of the moldings exhibited in the two galleries of the second floor of the MNBA are pieces made from the beginning of the 19th century until 1928, mainly in the period between 1860 and 1875 in France. (Source: MNBA).

Imagem manipulada de fotos tiradas de obras expostas na Galeria de Moldagens do Museu Nacional de Belas Artes

As duas Galerias de Moldagens abrigam mais de 150 obras em gesso. Esta magnífica coleção é constituída por peças moldadas sobre originais do período helenístico, romano, e do greco clássico (a chamada Era de Ouro). A maioria das Moldagens expostas nas duas galerias do 2º piso do MNBA são peças realizadas do inicio do século XIX até 1928, principalmente no período entre 1860 e 1875, na França. (Fonte: MNBA).

Museu Nacional de Belas Artes

Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

Art Week Gallery Group: Creative Classics

12/07/2019

EXPLORE

 

HOSPITAL SIRIO LIBANES

BELA VISTA - CONSOLAÇÂO - SAN PABLO - BRASIL

  

www.hospitalsiriolibanes.org.br/Paginas/nova-home.aspx

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hospital_S%C3%ADrio-Liban%C3%AAs

  

subí sábado 28/11/2020 15.30 hs:

 

1344/9340 10258 12762 14135 15581 17286 19446 21036

 

317/589 655 841 908 958 987 1009 1020

 

20/41 43 56 58 59 60 - 62

  

/L 181 EXPLORE 29/11/2020 (01 am)

Kerepesi/Salgótarjáni utca Cemetery, Budapest

On the right: Secession style mausoleum of Sváb family, designed by the notable Hungarian architect, Lajta Béla in 1909. In the background: the remnants of (roofless) Secession style Ceremonial Hall, designed also by Lajta Béla (1904-1908). www.budapestarchitect.com/text/architecten/lajta_en.php#....

 

Jobbra Sváb Jakab fiai és családjaik síremléke, tervezte Lajta Béla 1909-ben.

A háttérben a volt szertartás-épület, szintén Lajta tervezte, 1904-1908.

 

Salgótarjáni út, a legrégibb zsidó temető Pesten.

epiteszforum.hu/a-mulandosag-kepei-a-salgotarjani-uti-zsi...

mult-kor.hu/cikk.php?id=8718&pIdx=6

Founded in 1874, this is the oldest Jewish cemetery in the Pest side of Budapest. It is the Jewish section of the city’s Kerepesi monumental cemetery, where national heroes are buried — and is the final resting place of the crème de la crème of Hungarian Jewry of the time. Massive family tombs of Jewish noble families and industrialists line the perimeter; but there are also the graves of ordinary people. There is also a section where Holocaust victims are buried.

Quite a few of the tombs are the work of leading architects of the day — such as Ignác Alpár, Sándor Fellner, Albert Körössy, Emil Vidor and Béla Lajta. Lajta, whose work prefigured art deco, also designed the entry way from the street and the massive Ceremonial Hall (now roofless), built around 1908.

Today the cemetery is densely overgrown and tragically neglected. The huge tombs of families who once wielded social, political and financial power are literally crumbling; collapsing and being swallowed by vines and other vegetation. Some of them have been broken open: you can even see the coffins in the crypts

A few of the big tombs have been maintained and/or cleaned. And there have been fitful efforts to clear parts of the cemetery over the years — but it cries out for a concerted effort to clear the vegetation and save some of the family tombs.

Plants of the graveyard, according to the Talmud, must not be used in any way. Therefore in traditional Jewish communities trees and bushes of the cemetery are not pruned, grass is not mown, only the paths are paved and maintained. For the visitor this may suggest, usually without reason, untidiness, whereas the aim is the preservation of the natural environment. Moreover, this tradition expresses: it is futile to oppose decay.

www.jewish-heritage-europe.eu/galleries/hungary-photo-gal...

12.feb.09 - © All rights reserved !!!!

 

2.535 / 145 / 334 / 4 galleries

 

thank you all so much !!!!

 

the signs of change are every where

in shadows and reflections

light hitting objects

shadow in reflections on water

light dancing across waves

shadows reflecting what is close by

-Terri Turner-

 

dew drops .four in a row

 

~a gorgeous green thursday to every one ~

   

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To discover my universe, please take a look on my website.

All photographs are available for sale Fine Art Print.

Photographies et Formations Photos disponibles ici :

www.antoniogaudenciophoto.com/

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Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Modern Collection, Lisbon, Portugal

 

BIOGRAPHY:

 

Isabel Simões (1981) licenciou-se em Pintura na Faculdade de Belas-Artes de Lisboa em 2005. Em 2011 foi artista residente na Künstlerhaus Bethanien ao abrigo da bolsa João Hogan – Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian.

 

Das suas exposições individuais podem destacar-se Camuflagem (2016) Casa Museu Medeiros e Almeida; Rules for a Subjective Sundial (2013), Galeria Caroline Pagès; An Oblique Fiction (2011), Kunstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlim; Esperem Entrem (2010) e Plongée (2009) MARZ Galeria; Blame the city (2006), Módulo – Centro Difusor de Arte.

 

Isabel Simões participou em exposições colectivas como Atlas de Imagens (2014-15) que passou pelo Porto, Évora, Coimbra, Setúbal e Aveiro; BYTS- Bosch Young Talent Sow (2011), Stedelijk Museum, Hertogenbosch, Holanda; Unfolding: Space (2011), Grimmuseum, Berlim;

 

O Museu em Ruínas (2011), Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Elvas – Colecção António Cachola, Elvas; A Iminência da Queda (2009), Galeria do Diário de Notícias, Lisboa; Prémio Fidelidade Mundial Jovens Pintores (2007), Culturgest, Lisboa; 7 artistas ao 10o mês (2005), Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisboa; Expanded Painting (2005), Segunda Bienal de Praga, Praga, República Checa e Anteciparte, Estufa Fria, Lisboa (2004).

Blum Bernát

Kerepesi/Salgótarjáni utca Cemetery, Budapest

Salgótarjáni út, a legrégibb zsidó temető Pesten.

epiteszforum.hu/a-mulandosag-kepei-a-salgotarjani-uti-zsi...

Founded in 1874, this is the oldest Jewish cemetery in the Pest side of Budapest. It is the Jewish section of the city’s Kerepesi monumental cemetery, where national heroes are buried — and is the final resting place of the crème de la crème of Hungarian Jewry of the time. Massive family tombs of Jewish noble families and industrialists line the perimeter; but there are also the graves of ordinary people. There is also a section where Holocaust victims are buried.

Quite a few of the tombs are the work of leading architects of the day — such as Ignác Alpár, Sándor Fellner, Albert Körössy, Emil Vidor and Béla Lajta. Lajta, whose work prefigured art deco, also designed the entry way from the street and the massive Ceremonial Hall (now roofless), built around 1908.

Today the cemetery is densely overgrown and tragically neglected. The huge tombs of families who once wielded social, political and financial power are literally crumbling; collapsing and being swallowed by vines and other vegetation. Some of them have been broken open: you can even see the coffins in the crypts

A few of the big tombs have been maintained and/or cleaned. And there have been fitful efforts to clear parts of the cemetery over the years — but it cries out for a concerted effort to clear the vegetation and save some of the family tombs.

Plants of the graveyard, according to the Talmud, must not be used in any way. Therefore in traditional Jewish communities trees and bushes of the cemetery are not pruned, grass is not mown, only the paths are paved and maintained. For the visitor this may suggest, usually without reason, untidiness, whereas the aim is the preservation of the natural environment. Moreover, this tradition expresses: it is futile to oppose decay.

www.jewish-heritage-europe.eu/galleries/hungary-photo-gal...

xplor-stats.com/index.php?id=37578663@N02&mod=history

Parisiana Night Club, today a theatre.

Art Nouveau/Secession style, premodern building.

My Lajta set: www.flickr.com/photos/37578663@N02/sets/72157645708831478

About Lajta Béla: lajtaarchiv.hu/az-archivumrol/?lang=en

About the building: lajtaarchiv.hu/muvek/1908-1909-parisiana-mulato/?lang=en

Interior from 1921, deisgned by Vágó László.

Parisiana mulató, később különböző színházak (ld. az utolsó linket).

Szecessziós, premodern épület

1921-es enteriőr: Vágó László

Lajta Béláról: lajtaarchiv.hu/az-archivumrol/

vandoriskola.hu/sites/all/files/vandor-termuves-hu/tartal...

Az épületről: lajtaarchiv.hu/muvek/1908-1909-parisiana-mulato/

Az eredeti Lajta-homlokzat rekonstrukciója: epiteszforum.hu/pre-neo-poszt

Megjegyzés a következő linkhez: 1908-ban még nem létezett az art deco stílus, Lajta nagyon megelőzte korát: egykor.hu/budapest-vi--kerulet/parisiana-mulato-budapest/...

 

Museu Nacional de Arte Contemporânea (MNAC), Lisbon, Portugal

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

Desmontar jogos de poder, denunciar o autoritarismo político, a hipocrisia, expor o sofrimento no amor e a sexualidade encapotada, exaltar o poder feminino, não menos violento, perante todas as agressões, são alguns dos princípios subjacentes a uma obra, que desde a primeira exposição em Lisboa (SNBA, 1965/66), até hoje, continua a suscitar tanto a admiração quanto o embaraço.

Considerada durante décadas como “artista marginal”, porque indiferente às artes conceptual e performativa dominantes na Inglaterra, obtém o reconhecimento do establisment artístico britânico quando, em 1990, aceita ser a primeira “artista associada” da National Gallery, em Londres.

Se tivesse ficado em Portugal possivelmente teria sido «uma bêbada profissional» afirmou numa entrevista a Marco Livingstone, comissário da retrospectiva realizada no Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, 2007. A ida para Inglaterra foi decisiva, de outra forma nunca poderia ter faltado às aulas da Slade School of Art para ir ao cinema ou conhecido Victor Willing (1928-1988), intelectual, pintor, marido cúmplice da sua obra, cuja morte lenta inspirou novas metáforas, trevas e sombra que apreciava comentar.

Em criança, na companhia do pai, Paula Rego sentia um prazer especial em ver as gravuras de Gustave Doré, publicadas no livro “O Inferno”, de Dante. Sem o menosprezo «snob das belas artes» relativo à ilustração, a sua pintura privilegia contar uma história, o suspense, ultrapassando a obra na qual se inspira, seja ela proveniente da literatura oral ou escrita, pictórica, musical ou cinematográfica.

Conseguir passar «da cabeça para a mão» a corrente torrencial de imagens, sem censura, é um objectivo constante, muito embora, desde a série a pastel “A mulher-cão” (1994) utilize com frequência modelos, sobretudo Lila Nunes, antiga enfermeira de Victor Willing.

O prazer físico de cortar e colar desenhos, modus operandi de finais dos anos 50 até ao início da década de 80 – gerando quadros abstractos e viscerais, numa clara inspiração em Jean Dubuffet, defensor da Arte Bruta – foi assimilado à pintura a pastel das últimas décadas.

Criadora de fábulas, Paula Rego desenvolve um trabalho prévio de metteur en scène. Em Londres, o atelier é um palco secreto, no qual contracenam «fantasmas», alguns deles nascidos de esculturas que a pintora constrói. Longe de Portugal, a pátria que os inspira, submetem-se. Aqui «eles não virão mordê-la no rabo», lembra Nicholas Willing, o filho cineasta. Como a pintura é uma forma de «magia poderosa», esses fantasmas correm somente para dentro de quem os teme.

 

SN

Maio de 2010

 

Source : CAM

 

FROM WIKIPEDIA, THE FREE ENCYCLOPEDIA

 

Paula Rego

Born26 January 1935 (age 80)

Portugal

NationalityPortuguese

Known for painting, printmaking

Spouse(s)Victor Willing

 

AWARDS

Dame of the British Empire

Grã-Cruz da Ordem Militar de Sant'Iago da Espada

 

Dame Paula Rego, DBE (born 26 January 1935), is a Portuguese visual artist who is particularly well known for her paintings and prints based on storybooks. Rego’s style has evolved from abstract towards representational, and she has favoured pastels over oils for much of her career. Her work often reflects feminism, coloured by folk-themes from her native Portugal. Rego studied at the Slade School of Fine Art and was an exhibiting member of the London Group with David Hockney and Frank Auerbach. She was the first artist-in-residence at the National Gallery in London.[3] She lives and works in London.

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

Rego was born on 26 January 1935 in Lisbon, Portugal.[5] Her father was an electrical engineer who worked for the Marconi Company. Although this gave her a comfortable middle-class home, the family was divided in 1936 when her father was posted to work in the United Kingdom. Accompanied by Rego's mother, they left Rego behind in Portugal in the care of her grandmother until 1939. Her grandmother was to become a significant figure in Rego's life as she learnt many of the traditional folktales that would one day make their way into her artwork from her grandmother and the family maid.[6]

 

Rego's family were keen Anglophiles, and Rego was sent to the only English language school in Portugal at the time, Saint Julian's School in Carcavelos from 1945 to 1951. Although nominally a Catholic and living in a devoutly Catholic country, St Julian's School was Anglican and this combined with the hostility of Rego's father for the Catholic Church to create a distance between her and full-blooded Catholic belief. Rego has described herself as having become a "sort of Catholic," but equally she possessed as a child a sense of Catholic guilt and a very real belief that the Devil is real.

 

In 1951, Rego was sent to the United Kingdom to attend a finishing school called The Grove School, in Sevenoaks, Kent. Unhappy here, Rego attempted in 1952 to start studies in art at the Chelsea School of Art in London, but this was thwarted by her legal guardian in Britain, David Phillips, who feared her parents might not approve of their daughter mixing with art students. Returning to Portugal for the holidays that summer Rego discovered quite the opposite was true, and so she applied to study art in London again, this time at the Slade School of Fine Art. She attended the Slade School of Fine Art from 1952 to 1956.

 

At the Slade Rego met her future husband, Victor Willing, who was also a student at the Slade. In 1957 Rego and Willing left London to live in Ericeira, Portugal.[5] They were able to marry in 1959 following Willing's divorce from his first wife, Hazel Whittington. Three years later Rego's father bought the couple a house in London, at Albert Street in Camden Town and Rego's time was spent divided between Britain and Portugal. In 1966 Rego's father died, and the family electrical business was taken over, unwillingly, by Rego's husband, although he had himself been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The company failed in 1974 during the Portuguese Revolution that overthrew the country's right-wing Estado Novo dictatorship, with the production works taken over by the revolutionary forces, even though Rego's family had been supporters of the political left. As a result, Rego, Willing and their children moved permanently to London and spent most of their time there until Willing's death in 1988.

 

CAREER

 

Although Rego was commissioned by her father to produce a series of large-scale murals to decorate the works' canteen at his electrical factory in 1954 whilst she was still a student, Rego's artistic career effectively began in the early 1962 when she began showing with The London Group, a long-established artists' organization which included David Hockney and Frank Auerbach among its members. In 1965 she was selected to take part in a group show, Six Artists, at the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in London.[10] That same year she had her first solo show at the Sociedade Nacional de Belas Artes (SNBA) in Lisbon.[6] She was also the Portuguese representative at the 1969 São Paulo Art Biennial.[11] Between 1971 and 1978 she was to have seven solo shows in Portugal, in Lisbon and Oporto, and then a series of solo exhibitions in Britain, including at the AIR Gallery in London in 1981, the Arnolfini in Bristol in 1983, and the Edward Totah Gallery, London in 1984, 1985 and 1987.[12]

 

In 1988, Rego was the subject of a retrospective exhibition at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon and the Serpentine Gallery in London. This led on to Rego being invited to become the first Associate Artist at the National Gallery, London in 1990, in what was the first of a series of artist-in-residence schemes organized by the gallery. From this emerged two sets of work. The first was a series of paintings and prints on the theme of nursery rhymes, which was toured around Britain and elsewhere by the Arts Council of Great Britain and British Council from 1991 to 1996. The second was a series of large-scale paintings inspired by the paintings of Carlo Crivelli in the National Gallery, known as 'Crivelli’s Garden' which are now housed in the main restaurant at the gallery.

 

Other exhibitions include a retrospective at Tate Liverpool in 1997, Dulwich Picture Gallery in 1998, Tate Britain in 2005 and Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery in 2007. A major retrospective was also held of her work at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid in 2007, which travelled to the Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, the following year.

 

In 2008, Rego showed at Marlborough Chelsea in New York and staged a retrospective of her graphic works at the Ecole Superieure des Beaux-Arts, Nîmes. As well as showing at Marlborough Fine Art in London in 2010, the art critic Marco Livingstone organised a retrospective of her work at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Monterrey, Mexico, which was later shown at the Pinacoteca de São Paulo, Brazil.

 

Rego's artwork can now be seen at public and private institutions around the world. The artist has 43 works in the collection of the British Council, 10 works in the collection of the Arts Council of England, 46 works in the Tate Gallery, London, as well as many other institutions.

 

STYLE AND INFLUENCES

 

Rego is a prolific painter and printmaker, and in earlier years was also a producer of collage work.[15] Her most well-known depictions of folk tales and images of young girls, made largely since 1990, bring together the methods of painting and printmaking with an emphasis on strong and clearly drawn forms, in contrast to Rego's earlier more loose style paintings.

 

Yet in her earliest works, such as Always at Your Excellency's Service, painted in 1961, Rego was strongly influenced by Surrealism, particularly the work of Joan Miró. This manifested itself not only in the type of imagery that appeared in these works but in the method Rego employed which was based on the Surrealist idea of automatic drawing, in which the artist attempts to disengage the conscious mind from the making process to allow the unconscious mind to direct the image making.

 

At times these paintings almost verged on abstraction, but as proven by Salazar Vomiting the Homeland, painted in 1960, even when her work veered toward abstraction a strong narrative element remained in place, with Salazar being the right-wing dictator of Portugal in power at the time.[18]

 

There are two principal causes for Rego adopting a semi-abstract style in the 1960s. The first is the simple dominance of abstraction in avant-garde artistic circles at the time, which set figurative art on the defensive. But Rego was also reacting against her training at the Slade School, where a very strong emphasis had been placed on anatomical figure drawing. Under the encouragement of her fellow student and later husband Victor Willing, Rego kept a 'secret sketchbook', alongside her official school sketchbooks, whilst at the Slade, in which she made free-form drawings of a type that would have been frowned upon by her tutors. This apparent dislike of crisp drawing techniques in the 1960s manifested itself not only in the style of works such as Faust and the Red Monkey series of the 1980s, which resemble expressionistic comic book drawing but in her acknowledged influences at the time, which included Jean Dubuffet and Chaim Soutine.

 

A notable change of style emerged in 1990 following Rego's appointment to be the first 'Associate Artist' of the National Gallery, London, which was effectively an artist-in-residence scheme. Her brief was to ' work in whatever way she wished around works in the collection.' As the National Gallery is overwhelmingly an Old Master collection Rego seems to have been pulled back towards a much clearer, or tighter, linear style that is reminiscent of the highly wrought drawing technique she would have been taught at the Slade. The result of this was a series of works which came to characterise the popular perception of Rego's style, comprising strong clear drawing, with depictions of equally strong women in sometimes disturbing situations. Works like Crivelli's Garden have clear links to the paintings by Carlo Crivelli in the National Gallery, but other works made at the time, like Joseph's Dream and The Fitting, also draw spatially and in their subject matter from Old Master works by artists such as Diego Velázquez.[21]

 

Having given up college in the late 1970s, Rego began using pastels as a medium in the early 1990s and continues to use this medium to this day, almost to the exclusion of oil paint.

 

Amongst the most notable works made in pastel are those of her Dog Women series, in which women are shown sitting, squatting, scratching and generally behaving as if they are dogs. This antithesis of what is considered feminine behaviour, and many other works in which there appears to be either the threat of female violence or its actual manifestation, has associated Rego with feminism, and she has acknowledged reading Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex, a key feminist text, at a young age and this making a deep impression on her.] Her work also chimed with the interest of feminist writers on art such as Griselda Pollock in Freudian criticism in the 1990s, with works such as Girl Lifting up her Skirt to a Dog of 1986, and Two Girls and a Dog of 1987 appearing to have disturbing Freudian sexual undertones. However, Rego has been known to slap down critics who read too much sexual connotation into her work.

 

Another explanation for Rego's depiction of women as unfeminine, animalistic or brutal beings is that this reflects the physical reality of a woman as a human being in the physical world and not idealised types in the minds of men.

photo taken at the backyard of my nephew in Cuiabá - MT - Brazil

View On Black

 

View Awards Count

 

MnBA (Museu Nacional de Belas Artes)

 

Saída Fotocultura - FotoLove

Symmetry of a Seated Lady -Museu Nacional de Belas Artes- (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Gustavo Thomas © 2015)

Vidovszky Béla: Parlor of the Kohner Palace, 1910

Kohner Adolf was a great art collector.

A Kohner-palota szalonja

Kohner Adolfról, a nagy műgyűjtőről: www.kieselbach.hu/gyujtoknek/tudastar/szakmai-dokumentumo...

 

Hungary, Budapest, Art Hall, 1896. Műcsarnok. Pyrogranit work by Zsolnay.

Pyrogranite refers to a type of ornamental ceramics that were developed by Zsolnay and placed in production by 1886. Fired under high temperature this durable material remains acid and frost-resistant making it suitable for the use as roof tiles, indoor and outdoor decorative ceramics, and fireplaces. Architects that used the material in their buildings include Miklós Ybl, Ödön Lechner, Béla Lajta, Samu Pecz, and Imre Steindl. It can be seen in buildings such as Matthias Church in Budapest, the Hungarian Parliament Building, the Museum of Applied Art, the Geological Institute, the Kőbánya Church, the Gellért Baths, the Town Hall in Kecskemét, and the Post Office Palace in Pécs.

- The Műcsarnok (“art hall”) was founded in 1877 on the initiative of the Hungarian National Fine Arts Association. The original building was situated at 69–71 Andrássy Street, now home to the University of Fine Arts. The exhibition hall on Heroes’ Square was erected in 1896 for the millennium celebrations, and was designed by Albert Schikedanz. Today the hall operates on the pattern of the German Kunsthalle: it is an institution run by artists that does not maintain its own collection. The three-bayed, semi-circular apse houses a roofed exhibition hall that allows in light through the roof. Since the building was renovated in 1995 the Műcsarnok has welcomed visitors and leading Hungarian and international contemporary artists alike, mediating and representing modern artistic tendencies whilst not maintaining its own permanent collection.

www.mucsarnok.hu/new_site/index.php?lang=en&about=5&a...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Schickedanz

Budapest. This week walking in Ferencváros and Józsefváros, detail of Museum of Applied Arts. Art Nouveau, stylized Hungarian folk motifs.. Architect: Ödön Lechner. Ceramics: Pyrogranite by Vilmos Zsolnay. Pyrogranite refers to a type of ornamental ceramics that were developed by Zsolnay and placed in production by 1886. Fired under high temperature this durable material remains acid and frost-resistant making it suitable for the use as roof tiles, indoor and outdoor decorative ceramics, and fireplaces. Architects that used the material in their buildings include Miklós Ybl, Ödön Lechner, Béla Lajta, Samu Pecz, and Imre Steindl. It can be seen in buildings such as Matthias Church in Budapest, the Hungarian Parliament Building, the Museum of Applied Art, the Geological Institute, the Kőbánya Church, the Gellért Baths, the Town Hall in Kecskemét, and the Post Office Palace in Pécs.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%c3%96d%c3%b6n_Lechner

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zsolnay

www.museum.hu/museum/index_en.php?ID=33

www.museum.hu/museum/index_hu.php?ID=33

hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lechner_%c3%96d%c3%b6n

 

Esta imagen participó en el juego En un lugar de Flickr

Si no perteneces al grupo, no contestes, por favor.

Si quieres contestar, únete. :-)

 

Pista 1: Obra de una artista que hizo sus estudios en esa localidad

 

Dalila Gonçalves PT

Nasceu em Castelo de Paiva em 1982.

 

Licenciatura em Artes Plásticas – Pintura, Faculdade de Belas Artes da Univesidade do Porto (FBAUP), 2005

2ª Edição do Curso de Fotografia do Programa Gulbenkian Criatividade e Criação Artística, 2008

Mestrado – Ensino de Artes Visuais, Faculdade de Belas Artes e Faculdade de Psicologia da Universidade do Porto, 2009

Programa Inov-Art em Barcelona no Atelier do Artista Ignasi Aballí, 2010 /2011

Doutoramento Arte e Design – Faculdade de Belas Artes UP (em Frequência)

Artistas de vários países expoem obras em diversos suportes, como papel, papelão, reciclaveis, telas, gravuras, fotografia, madeira, entre outros.

 

No final do evento todas obras são distribuidas gratuitamente para os visitantes.

Também performances de breaking e rappers sobre a discotecagem dos DJs Guinho e Brown.

 

artistas confirmados:

{somos} - SP

5 zonas- SP

Adelia Klinke- SP

Beatriz Franco- BA

Beth Turkiniez - SP

Bruno Capella -SP

Bruno di Chico - SP

Bruno Pere - SP

Caps- SP

Cleisson Vidal - SP

Cris- SP

Cristiano Cury - SP

Daniel Jabra - SP

Danilo Blanco - SP

Dingos - SP

Dino - SP

Dogtired - Irlanda do Norte

Elaine Gomes - SP

Fernando Ribeiro - SP

Florian Raiss - SP

Fonthor - SP

Fredone Fone - ES

Gejo - SP

Gene Johnsom - SP

Gryllo - SP

Ian Monteiro - SP

Ivan Veras - MA

Johab Silva - EUA

Julio Barreto - SP

Kelly Polato - SP

Lea Van Steen - SP

Magy Imoberdorf - FRA

Minerox - EUA

Monica Rubinho - SP

Monica Vendramini - SP

Monica Zalla - ARG

Mr. Klevra - ITA

Neco Soares - SP

No Name - FRA

Nosde - SP

Omino71 - ITA

Ozi - SP

Padang Tatoo - SP

Patrica Kaufmann - SP

Patricia Ramiro - SP

Paulo Von Poser - SP

Rapto - SP

Raquel Kogan - SP

Ren - ES

Mheinproduktion - ALE

Rogerio Carnaval - SP

Sidney Philocreon - SP

Sipros- SP

Tumulos - SP

Turnip - EUA

Vea - SP

Viviane Leite - SP

 

Freeart

7 de novembro partir das 12 hs

Monica Figueiras Galeria de Arte

Bela Cintra. 1533 - Jardins

São Paulo - SP

organização : gejo e monica filgueiras

Contato: sp9370@yahoo.com.br

011-7508-5800- gejo

   

Por. Rogério Carnaval

www.9370.org

www.flickr.com/photos/gejo/

twitter.com/rogeriocarnaval

brunodichico.blogspot.com/

www.flickr.com/photos/necosoares/

www.fotolog.com.br/triposo

www.flickr.com/photos/rogeriocarnaval/

www.twitter.com/vistaskateart

www.fotolog.com/dingos_fc

www.flickr.com/photos/dingos1

        

Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Modern Collection, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Material: Iron polychromatic

Collection: Calouste Gulbenkian Museum - the Modern collection

Inv.: 83E1026

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

José Rodrigues – The sculptor who made his mark in Porto

18 April 2018 / Profile

 

José Rodrigues is one of the greatest Portuguese sculptors, deceased on September 10, but his works continue to mark the landscape of the city.

 

Born in Luanda, Angola, in 1936, José Rodrigues demonstrated at a very early age a taste for sculpture and even as a child he liked to mould clay. Later in Portugal, he studied sculpture at the Escola Superior de Belas Artes do Porto, where he would become a teacher sometime later. He was Founder and chairman of Cooperativa de Ensino Artístico Árvore and founder of the Bienal de Cerveira.

 

In addition to sculpture, he also dedicated himself to other artistic expressions. He Illustrated books for writers and poets, produced ceramics and medals, created scenographies and designed the set for the classification ceremony of Porto as a World Heritage City.

 

His foundation, located in a former hat factory, embraced not only his studio but also a place for dissemination of arts, with exhibition halls and an auditorium, receiving a ballet and theatre company as well.

 

Among his most famous works are O Cubo da Praça da Ribeira (The Cube of Ribeira Square) (1976) or the Entrepreneur Monument (1992).

 

SOURCE: www.heyporto.com/en/perfil/

tantas fotos de la gira aburren un poco (mucho).

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