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A few European Skipper were feeding on the Cow Vetch flowers at Cedar Meadows Resort and Spa in Mountjoy Township in the City of Timmins Northeastern Ontario Canada

The butterfly was fluttering on the water creating the ripples.Trout Lake Yellowstone National Park.

Thymelicus lineola / European skipper butterfly.

Meyer Optik Görlitz Diaplan 80mm f2.8 (an alternative Trioplan).

This is a poor mans macro of Goldenrod crab spider (Misumena vatia) eating a European Skipper butterfly (Thymelicus lineola).

 

On sunny days male skippers will perch themselves out in the open and strut their stuff for the females in an attempt to mate. This unlucky and unsuspecting skipper happened to land on a camouflaged crab spider posing as a yellow flower and got eaten. Poor guy.

 

I shot this photo with with a Jupiter 37a on a set of m42 extension tubes attached to my Sony Alpha A330.

 

Shutter: 1/250

Aperture: f 7.1

Iso : 100

WYLIE ROAD, CARDEN ALVAR, KIRKFIELD, ON, CANADA

 

id by Robert Bowles, Norbert Kondla.

Upper Peninsula of Michigan

 

Nikon 105mm macro lens with 36mm extension tube

European Skipper on Lavender

This photo of two tiny European Skipper butterflies was taken on 23 July 2015, at Darryl Teskey's property. These unusual butterflies have such large eyes : )

 

"The eyes of Skippers are different from those of other butterflies. They have a space between the cones and rods which allows light from each ommatidium to spill into neighbouring rods, effectively increasing their resolution and sensitivity. As a result Skippers can fly very accurately from one spot to another. This different type of eye structure is one of the reasons why taxonomists place them in a different super-family to all other butterflies - the Hesperioidea."

 

Source: www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/Anatomy.htm

 

On this day, five of us spent the day botanizing the land belonging to Darryl Teskey, SW of Calgary and W of Millarville (maybe a 40-minute drive from Calgary). This was the first time I had been there and I'm so glad I was invited to go - I would have missed all sorts of things, including a family of Ruffed Grouse and several fungi. These Grouse were the rare rufous-morph, and we startled them when we were walking through the forest in their direction. Usually, you don't see Grouse because they are so well-hidden. When you get fairly close (sometimes very close) to them, they suddenly "explode" from the tangle of shrubs and plants of the forest floor, making ones heart beat fast! We were taken by surprise when we came across a nearby statue of Saint Francis of Assisi, who is known as the patron saint of animals and the environment. A nice idea, I thought.

 

Our walk took us over grassland and through forest, many places treacherous with so many fallen logs which were often barely visible. I have never, ever seen so many tiny Skipper butterflies - there must have been hundreds or even thousands of these bright orange beauties that were flying or perched on flowers of every colour.

 

Fortunately, the rain stayed away until we started driving back to Calgary. Quite a lot of black clouds, reminding me of the tornado that passed through Calgary just the day before (22 July 2015).

 

Our purpose, as always, was to find and list everything that we saw - wildflowers, trees, grasses, birds, insects, fungi, etc.. Our leader then compiles an extensive list of our finds and this is later sent to the landowner, along with any photos that we might take. Always a win/win situation, as the landowner then has a much better idea of just what is on his property, and we have a most enjoyable day.

European Skipper Butterfly (Thymelicus lineola)

This photo of a tiny European Skipper butterfly was taken on 23 July 2015, at Darryl Teskey's property. These unusual butterflies have such large eyes : )

 

"The eyes of Skippers are different from those of other butterflies. They have a space between the cones and rods which allows light from each ommatidium to spill into neighbouring rods, effectively increasing their resolution and sensitivity. As a result Skippers can fly very accurately from one spot to another. This different type of eye structure is one of the reasons why taxonomists place them in a different super-family to all other butterflies - the Hesperioidea."

 

Source: www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/Anatomy.htm

 

On this day, five of us spent the day botanizing the land belonging to Darryl Teskey, SW of Calgary and W of Millarville (maybe a 40-minute drive from Calgary). This was the first time I had been there and I'm so glad I was invited to go - I would have missed all sorts of things, including a family of Ruffed Grouse and several fungi. These Grouse were the rare rufous-morph, and we startled them when we were walking through the forest in their direction. Usually, you don't see Grouse because they are so well-hidden. When you get fairly close (sometimes very close) to them, they suddenly "explode" from the tangle of shrubs and plants of the forest floor, making ones heart beat fast! We were taken by surprise when we came across a nearby statue of Saint Francis of Assisi, who is known as the patron saint of animals and the environment. A nice idea, I thought.

 

Our walk took us over grassland and through forest, many places treacherous with so many fallen logs which were often barely visible. I have never, ever seen so many tiny Skipper butterflies - there must have been hundreds or even thousands of these bright orange beauties that were flying or perched on flowers of every colour.

 

Fortunately, the rain stayed away until we started driving back to Calgary. Quite a lot of black clouds, reminding me of the tornado that passed through Calgary just the day before (22 July 2015).

 

Our purpose, as always, was to find and list everything that we saw - wildflowers, trees, grasses, birds, insects, fungi, etc.. Our leader then compiles an extensive list of our finds and this is later sent to the landowner, along with any photos that we might take. Always a win/win situation, as the landowner then has a much better idea of just what is on his property, and we have a most enjoyable day.

skipper

European Skipper Butterfly

Ochlodes sylvanus (Large skipper)

Z or L for larger view, F11 for full screen

European Skipper Butterfly feeding on a Canada Thistle photographed off the Gillies Lake Conservation trail located in the City of Timmins Northeastern Ontario Canada.

European Skipper Butterflies feeding on Cow Vetch flowers on the Cedar Meadows Place Richelieu section of the Bridge to Bridge Trail located in Mountjoy Township in the City of Timmins Northeastern Ontario Canada

Cacharodus alceae is a medium size butterfly of cretan fauna. The butterfly prefers warm and stony areas to settle on. It gets its nectar from herbaceous plants.

Mallow Skippers lay their eggs on different species of Mallow. The butterfly flies from April to October depending on the location. It could have three generatons per year. The larvae feed on Malva sylvestris, Malva neglecta and Althaea officinalis. The caterpillar overwinters in most cases mature and pupates in the spring without re-feeding.

I'm guessing at the name of this tiny orange Skipper, based on matching up pictures in my butterfly field guide and extrapolating from what I read online about these butterflies having been accidentally introduced into Canada via London, Ontario, in the early part of the 20th century.

I'm guessing at the name of this tiny orange Skipper, based on matching up pictures in my butterfly field guide and extrapolating from what I read online about these butterflies having been accidentally introduced into Canada via London, Ontario, in the early part of the 20th century.

 

For further reading, here's a good link: www.cbif.gc.ca/eng/species-bank/butterflies-of-canada/eur...

A European Skipper on our Butterfly Bush in the backyard. This is a really beautiful little skipper and always fun to see another one.

This photo of a tiny European Skipper butterfly was taken on 23 July 2015, at Darryl Teskey's property. These unusual butterflies have such large eyes : )

 

"The eyes of Skippers are different from those of other butterflies. They have a space between the cones and rods which allows light from each ommatidium to spill into neighbouring rods, effectively increasing their resolution and sensitivity. As a result Skippers can fly very accurately from one spot to another. This different type of eye structure is one of the reasons why taxonomists place them in a different super-family to all other butterflies - the Hesperioidea."

 

Source: www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/Anatomy.htm

 

On this day, five of us spent the day botanizing the land belonging to Darryl Teskey, SW of Calgary and W of Millarville (maybe a 40-minute drive from Calgary). This was the first time I had been there and I'm so glad I was invited to go - I would have missed all sorts of things, including a family of Ruffed Grouse and several fungi. These Grouse were the rare rufous-morph, and we startled them when we were walking through the forest in their direction. Usually, you don't see Grouse because they are so well-hidden. When you get fairly close (sometimes very close) to them, they suddenly "explode" from the tangle of shrubs and plants of the forest floor, making ones heart beat fast! We were taken by surprise when we came across a nearby statue of Saint Francis of Assisi, who is known as the patron saint of animals and the environment. A nice idea, I thought.

 

Our walk took us over grassland and through forest, many places treacherous with so many fallen logs which were often barely visible. I have never, ever seen so many tiny Skipper butterflies - there must have been hundreds or even thousands of these bright orange beauties that were flying or perched on flowers of every colour.

 

Fortunately, the rain stayed away until we started driving back to Calgary. Quite a lot of black clouds, reminding me of the tornado that passed through Calgary just the day before (22 July 2015).

 

Our purpose, as always, was to find and list everything that we saw - wildflowers, trees, grasses, birds, insects, fungi, etc.. Our leader then compiles an extensive list of our finds and this is later sent to the landowner, along with any photos that we might take. Always a win/win situation, as the landowner then has a much better idea of just what is on his property, and we have a most enjoyable day.

Buena Vista Prairie Chicken Meadow

Wisconsin State Natural Area #85

Buena Vista Wildlife Area

 

Portage County

European Skipper butterfly on Fleabane

European Skipper Butterfly (Thymelicus lineola)

This little critter is only about a half inch long or 2cm. So pretty perched on the wild clover

European Skipper butterflies were feeding on the Fireweed flowers located along the Domtar Overlook on the Bridge to Bridge Trail in the City of Timmins Northeastern Ontario Canada.

Photographed in Farmington Minnesota

June 16th 2015

So, that is another bio-blitz finished, after posting 14 odds and ends late tonight. Sorry to post so many in a row, but at least you don't have to look at them : ) I really wanted to get the rest of my suitable shots taken that day edited and posted, so that I can send Lisa the link to my album about her property.

 

The area we visited on 7 August was an 80-acre site near Bottrel, NW of Calgary. The site consisted of mostly open, low, hilly, ungrazed land, with a few Aspens and Spruce, and willows around three ponds (two of which were dry). On 25 May 2018, four people had visited this site for the first time - I had been unable to go, as I was spending the day with my daughter.

 

The original visit was the result of the owners winning a free bioblitz at a Silent Auction, in connection with the Ghost Valley Community. A great idea and always a win-win situation, with the land owners learning a lot about what is found on their land, and the leader and participants enjoying a much-appreciated visit to a different location.

 

We were very lucky to see an adult male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker with two juveniles. I rarely see one of these birds, but love to see the neat rows of small holes that they make on a tree trunk.

 

Did you know that photographing mushrooms can be dangerous? I believe I knew this already and I was reminded of this on this bio-blitz. Towards the end of our hike, I stopped to photograph a not particularly photogenic mushroom that was growing on a very slight incline. I took one step back to focus better and lost my balance - not sure if my foot went down into a shallow hole or if I was tripped up by one of the many very small, short tree stumps. Whatever the cause, I did a most inelegant, slow-motion fall backwards, hitting my head hard on the ground, surrounded by my friends. Because I was wearing a backpack, I think this resulted in some whiplash, with my head falling back. It was not pleasant to drive anywhere the next day, especially each time I had to start off when traffic lights turned green. The muscles all around my neck and my shoulders are painful, but hopefully it will clear up before too long.

Carden Alvar, Kirkfield, On

 

Butterflies of Ontario from 2015 not uploaded??!!

Vaughan Crest Park, Thornhill, On

 

FOY

 

I checked all the Bird's-foot Trefoil for European Common Blue but found none today!

This Butterfly really looks more like a Moth with its fuzzy head and wings...so when I took a picture of it that is what I thought it was.

 

Image taken with my 70-300mm VR lens with a manual extension tube attached. Use a flash on this fellow.

 

Here is the link to the folder with the images taken with this "macro" lens:

 

www.flickr.com/photos/the_kav/sets/72157624509443949/

European Skipper butterfly

 

WYLIE ROAD, CARDEN ALVAR, KIRKFIELD, ON

The Fireweed flowers were covered by feeding European Skipper Butterflies. Alongside the Domtar Overlook section of the Bridge to Bridge Trail in Timmins Ontario Canada.

GLENDON FOREST TRAIL, TORONTO, ON, CANADA

at Spring Garden natural area in Windsor, Ontario.

Vaughan Crest Park, Thornhill, On

 

FOY

 

I checked all the Bird's-foot Trefoil for European Common Blue but found none today!

A European Skipper butterfly on a blade of grass

Camera Used: Canon EOS Rebel T1i

Lens Used: Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM prime lens

It was a cold (52°F), windy day in Greensboro. The field had thousands of these tiny butterflies resting in the grasses and flowers.

 

Thymelicus lineola – European Skipper butterflies

 

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