new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged Hashemites

The Al-Khazneh (building that appears in "Indiana Jones"), for example, is a work of century 1 a.C .: made like real mausoleum. Its façade, of Hellenistic inspiration, impresses by the dimensions: it is 43 meters of height by 30 of width. At the top of one of the mountains surrounding Petra is another work of art: the Ad-Deir, another mausoleum, but which was used in the 5th century AD as a Byzantine church. To visit it, you have to face 800 steps that lead to the top. Petra was a powerful city. The Nabataeans put her on the route of the caravans that crossed the Arabian peninsula towards the Mediterranean or the Red Sea. They have developed irrigation systems and built dams to store rainwater that falls from time to time into the desert. In its peak, the place had 30 thousand inhabitants.

Petra flourished in the 1st century AD when its famous Khazneh structure – believed to be the mausoleum of Nabataean King Aretas IV – was constructed, and its population peaked at an estimated 20,000 inhabitants.

Two other churches have been identified along the southern side of the terrace of the Temple to Artemis. They were probably the result of changes made to existing temples. In particular the entrance to the Cathedral (built in ca 365) from Cardo Maximus is similar to that to the Temple to Artemis which is located at a few yards of distance.

Across the Treasury (Al-Khazneh).

Guide required on this trail.

Tea, but I wanted to have beer.

 

Climbing the processional way, pausing for tea with the Bedouin in the gardens of wildflowers.

Petra/Jordan, the capitol city of ancient Nabatea, is for me one of the most exciting places you can visit.

If you visit the rock city of the Nabateans, after crossing the Siq (a 1.5 km long gorge) you will inevitably encounter "The Treasury of the Pharaoh", as the Bedouin call the building.

In fact, the approximately 40 m high and carved from bare rock magnificent building was one of many rock tombs.

 

Danke für deinen Besuch! Thanks for visiting!

bitte beachte/ please respect Copyright © All rights reserved

Wadi Rum, known also as the Valley of the Moon, is a valley cut into the sandstone and granite rock in southern Jordan 60 km (37 mi) to the east of Aqaba; it is the largest wadi in Jordan.

 

Wadi Rum Protected Area was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2011.

 

Wadi Rum most likely gets it name from the early name of Iram of the Pillars. Iram of the Pillars or the "City of the pillars", is a lost city, region or tribe mentioned in the Quran.

Hidden high in the hills, the Monastery is one of the legendary monuments of Petra. Similar in design to the Treasury but far bigger (50m wide and 45m high), it was built in the 3rd century BCE as a Nabataean tomb. It derives its name from the crosses carved on the inside walls, suggestive of its use as a church in Byzantine times. The ancient rock-cut path of more than 800 steps starts from the Basin Restaurant and follows the old processional route.

He is on my right.

It is not that far away to walk.

I am in the middle and know the correct angle.

 

A summer site where you can enjoy a spectacular sunset, take a good photo, and leave the stresses of work behind you, to step out of time, a place where you get the most dramatic views of Wadi Rum when the sun sinks below the horizon.

  

Coming back to my Bedouin camp from the sunrise.

There is no use of saying it's dangerous, I know.

My adrenaline is in these heights.

Thanks a lot for your concern, I really appreciate it.

  

***

  

Cast an eye across the superb panorama in front of you – far above the mortal goings-on of both ancient and modern city – and it’s easy to see how this site must have seemed closer to the sky than the earth.

  

A walk in Wadi Farusa:

  

Adventurous travellers often deviate from the main trail through Petra to climb to the High Place of Sacrifice, an area of temples with stunning views of the valley below. It's well worth the trip, but on the way down to reconnect with the main route, push a little further. The walk back past Wadi Farusa offers ample opportunity to sit down for tea with a local family or explore tomb complexes where little more than goat droppings mark the passage of time. Either experience adds a certain depth to Petra that most visitors never make time for.

  

***

  

When the ancient city of Petra reached its peak about 2,000 years ago, most of its structures were carved directly into the sandstone cliffs of the mountains of southern Jordan.

 

Montreal is a Crusader castle on the eastern side of the Arabah, perched on the side of a rocky, conical mountain, looking out over fruit trees below. The ruins, called Shoubak or Shawbak in Arabic, are located in modern town of Shoubak in Jordan.

 

This was a crusader castle originally, but it was destroyed about 70 years after being built. Montreal castle finally fell to the famous Saladin after a two year siege, and most of what remains today was built by Mameluks.

 

Named in honour of Lawrence’s book, this large rock formation, with seven fluted turrets, is easy to see from the road near the Wadi Rum visitor centre. If you fancy a closer look, a rewarding hike circumnavigates the mountain via Makharas Canyon.

 

Wadi Rum, a desert valley in Jordan, has played the part of Mars and distant planets in countless movies, including "The Martian," "Star Wars: Rogue One," "Prometheus," and Red Planet."

"Do not free the camel from the weight of your hump; maybe you're making it stop being a camel."

 

G.K. Chesterton

The first open area boasts four triclinia – one on the left and three on the right – are in the second open area. These were probably used as dining rooms to feed hungry merchants and travellers.

The reddish hue of the sand combined with the massive granite rock faces and sandstone mesas makes for an otherworldly landscape.

 

While there are dunes in several places around Wadi Rum, the most striking are the red sands that bank up against Jebel Umm Ulaydiyya. If you are on a 4WD or camel tour, drivers will stop near a pristine slope for you to plod your way to the crest of the dune. They're particularly lovely at sunset.

The sand in Wadi Rum is known for being the reddest in Jordan. It's colored by iron oxide.

Petra/Jordan, the capitol city of ancient Nabatea, is for me one of the most exciting places you can visit.

Ed Deir means the "Monastery", is one of the largest monuments in Petra. The Deir monument is 40.2 meters wide and is carved deep into the side of the mountain. The door itself is 8 meters high. The main inside chamber is huge. It is 11.5 meters by 10 meters, and is lit only by light coming through the 8 meter high doorway.

Around the Deir Plateau there are many excellent views of deep gorges and even Wadi Araba'.

(source: nabataea.net/deir.html )

 

Danke für deinen Besuch! Thanks for visiting!

bitte beachte/ please respect Copyright © All rights reserved.

The Odeon is a small 500-seat theatre in Amman, Jordan.

 

Not to be confused with the large Roman Theatre that stands right next to it, on the southern side of the Hashemite Plaza, while the Odeon stands on the east side of the Plaza.

 

Archaeologists have speculated that the Odeon was most likely closed by a temporary wooden roof that shielded the audience from the weather.

 

The building is a Roman odeon, built in the 2nd century CE, at the same time as the Roman Theatre next to it.

 

The Odeon was recently restored along with the nearby Nymphaeum fountain.

The towers and walls are decorated with carved inscriptions dating from 14th century Mameluke renovations, but the inside is ruinous.

 

Head to the northeastern corner of the castle to see Quranic inscriptions, possibly dating from the time of Saladin, carved in Kufic script around the outside of the keep.

Travel Agencies have visited a number of Greco-Roman cities and can state with propriety that Jerash in northern Jordan is one of the most incredible to visit the world!

 

WikiTravel comes to refer to Jerash as the 'Pompeii' of the East, given the breadth of the city and high degree of preservation of the ruins. Not to mention that Jerash, like Pompeii, was also destroyed by a manifestation of the fury of nature. While the Italian was buried in an eruption of Mount Vesuvius, the Jordanian was decimated by the great earthquake of the year 749.

 

Founded by the Greeks in the third century BC, the city prospered thanks to the strategic position on the commercial routes of incense and spices that came from Syria. It reached its peak already under Roman rule, having become the favorite city of Emperor Hadrian and erected a bow in honor of his visit in the first century. In that period, Jerash occupied a fortified area of ​​800,000 m² that housed a gigantic oval square surrounded by 160 columns, an avenue of 600 meters also flanked by columns, fountains, a temple dedicated to the goddess Artemis, a hippodrome, an amphitheater and the arch already mentioned.

The Palace Tomb:

 

In making my way up to the Temple of Winged Lions, you might wonder what the old pile of stones opposite represents. Spread over a broad platform, this site was thought to be a former royal palace but is now an unrecognisable ruin.

  

Jerash’s superb colonnaded cardo maximus is straight in the way that only a Roman road can be. This is one of Jerash’s great highlights, and the walk along its entire 800m length from North Gate to the forum is well worth the effort. Built in the 1st century AD and complete with manholes to underground drainage, the street still bears the hallmarks of the city’s principal thoroughfare, with the ruts worn by thousands of chariots scored into the original flagstones.

 

The 500 columns that once lined the street were deliberately built at different heights to complement the facades of the buildings that stood behind them. Although most of the columns you see today were reassembled in the 1960s, they give an excellent impression of this spectacular thoroughfare.

 

There are many buildings of interest on either side of the cardo maximus, in various states of restoration and ruin. A highlight is the northern tetrapylon, an archway with four entrances.

The Odeon is a small 500-seat theatre in Amman, Jordan.

 

Not to be confused with the large Roman Theatre that stands right next to it, on the southern side of the Hashemite Plaza, while the Odeon stands on the east side of the Plaza.

 

Archaeologists have speculated that the Odeon was most likely closed by a temporary wooden roof that shielded the audience from the weather.

 

The building is a Roman odeon, built in the 2nd century CE, at the same time as the Roman Theatre next to it.

 

The Odeon was recently restored along with the nearby Nymphaeum fountain.

The Temple of Artemis was built in the 2nd century AD. The columns are 12 m high and each drum weighs 20-40 tons. Artemis was the virgin goddess of nature and the hunt (the Romans called her Diana). The daughter of Zeus and the twin sister of Apollo, Artemis was one of the most popular Greek deities. She was like “Mother Nature,” life-giving and supportive on the one hand, but cruel and destructive on another. Artemis was also the patron goddess of a temple at Ephesus, whose well-being was threatened by the presence of the Gospel (Acts 19).

On top of Mt Nebo, this modest church, or more accurately basilica, was built around 4th-century foundations in 597 and has just undergone major reconstruction. It houses some of the best (and best presented) mosaics in Jordan, dating from around 530. The masterpiece is a hunting and herding scene interspersed with an assortment of African fauna, including a zebu (humped ox), lions, tigers, bears, boars, zebras, an ostrich on a leash and a camel-shaped giraffe.

 

The church was abandoned by the 16th century and only relocated in the 20th century, using 4th- and 5th-century pilgrim travelogues. The Franciscans bought the site in 1932 and were responsible for excavating most of the ruins of the church and the monastery, as well as reconstructing much of the basilica.

 

The church is part of a functioning monastery, off limits to visitors. There's a small but fascinating museum presenting the history of the site.

The canyon widens after 400 metres (1,300 ft). In this open area many of the sandstone walls have had openings carved into them; they were used as dwellings. On the south face is a colonnaded triclinium with a projecting pedimented portico that archaeologists believe was used as a temple, though they know very little about it.

 

The canyon then narrows again for another 50 m (150 ft), leading to another, smaller open area. The carved openings are even more numerous here, including four large triclinia. Archaeologists believe these spaces could have been used to entertain visiting merchants.

The castle and area around it are currently being investigated by an Italian archaeological team from the University of Florence.

Red sand dune.

 

Wadi Rum desert is dotted with sand dunes. Both yellow and red.Red sand dune in Wadi Rum desert The highest dune can be found in Wadi Um Ishrin. But I prefer to visit the one near Khazali canyon. For two reasons. This dune is easy to climb via the rocks. This will leave you with plenty of energy to enjoy the beautiful valley views. And to run down the dune. For the base of the dune you can take pictures for the intense red of the dune and the deep blue of the sky above. Or you can make a picture for the red sand dune and Jabal Rum and Jabal Um Ishrin. One of our favourites. The best time to take pictures here is during the morning. I was in the afternoon and morning.

After much debate as to whether the central space had originally been covered or left open to the elements, consensus came down on the side of the ceiling dome, which was reconstructed by Spanish archaeologists.

Desert dunes and mountains.

A second Roman temple was constructed in the north of the Citadel site at the hightest point of the acropolis. It was built before the mid 2nd century AD, however its materials were later integrated into the structure of the Umayyad Complex in 730 AD.

Next door, the South Theatre was built in the 1st century with a capacity of 5000 spectators. From the upper stalls the acoustics are still wonderful, as demonstrated by the occasional roving minstrel or drummer.

Also, the view from the little mountain behind the house is very beautiful and far reaching. They would have seen people coming from a long way off.

 

The area is centered on the main valley of Wadi Rum. The highest elevation in Jordan is Jabal Umm ad Dami at 1,840 m (6,040 ft) high (SRTM data states 1854 m), located 30 kilometres south of Wadi Rum village. It was first located by Difallah Ateeg, a Zalabia Bedouin from Rum. On a clear day, it is possible to see the Red Sea and the Saudi border from the top.

 

Jabal Ram or Jebel Rum (1,734 metres (5,689 ft) above sea level) is the second highest peak in Jordan and the highest peak in the central Rum, rising directly above Rum valley, opposite Jebel um Ishrin, which is possibly one metre lower.

 

Khaz'ali Canyon in Wadi Rum is the site of petroglyphs etched into the cave walls depicting humans and antelopes dating back to the Thamudic times. The village of Wadi Rum itself consists of several hundred Bedouin inhabitants with their goat-hair tents and concrete houses and also their four-wheel vehicles, one school for boys and one for girls, a few shops, and the headquarters of the Desert Patrol.

 

Recently, Geoff Lawton has achieved success in establishing a permaculture ecosystem in Wadi Rum.

Find a "Face & Lips" to kiss!

  

National Geographic describes the formations as the "result of primordial tectonic movement that cleaved the bedrock with almost cubic perfection before raising it high above the desert floor."

View of the Royal Tombs in Petra.

 

***

 

The ruins of the city of Petra have more than 2,000 years of history since the foundation by the Nabateans, a Bedouin people who ruled part of Jordan. From the red stones of the desert comes the nickname of 'pink city', since its buildings were excavated in the rocks of this coloration. Bastion of caravans coming or going to the East, the place even housed 30,000 people at its peak. From the Nabataeans, Petra passed into the dominion of the Romans, Byzantines and Crusaders until being forgotten in the midst of the sands of time. There are ruins of all these periods scattered by its 264 km ².

 

So book at least two days to get to know Petra, as it is extremely tiring to try to see everything in just one visit, especially if you want to walk the trails, such as Al Kubtha. Only the entrance canyon, with rock walls of more than 200 meters high, is two kilometers long. Outside it, the great attractions of the archaeological site are the Treasury, the Monastery, the series of ornate tombs and the Roman ruins. Also, do not miss the 'Petra by Night' show, when the path to the ruins and facade of the Treasury are lit by thousands of candles.

 

Petra is in southern Jordan, in a town called Wadi Musa. To get to it you can hire a private driver or take a taxi (private or collective, which works as a bus) from any city in the country, as it is very small. From the capital, Amman, it is only three hours drive by express highway.

For some scrambling (or scrambling watching).

 

This is a natural rock bridge, created by many years of water and wind.

The Um Fruth rock bridge is about 15 meters up from the desert floor. Climbing the rock bridge is steep but not difficult. You can climb up within 5 minutes. Especially if you follow the directions of your guide. From the top of the rock bridge you have a spectacular view on the surrounding area. It is one of the most photographed places in Wadi Rum desert.

 

I climbed to the top... as long as you are not afraid of heights.

The most distinctive of the Royal Tombs is the Urn Tomb, recognisable by the enormous urn on top of the pediment. It was built in about AD 70 for King Malichos II (AD 40–70) or Aretas IV (8 BC–AD 40). The naturally patterned interior of the Urn Tomb measures a vast 18m by 20m.

 

Part of what makes the Urn Tomb such a grand structure is the flanking Doric portico cut into the rock face on the left of the tomb, and the huge open terrace in front of it – a feature that encouraged its use, according to a Greek inscription inside the tomb, as a cathedral in AD 447. The double layer of vaults was added at a later date by the Byzantines. Look towards the top of the building and you’ll see three inaccessible openings carved between the pillars. These are also tombs, the central one of which still has the closing stone intact, depicting the king dressed in a toga.

 

Earning its name from the urn-shaped finial crowning the pediment, this grand edifice with supporting arched vaults was perhaps built for the man represented by the toga-wearing bust in the central aperture.

Sunrise 2, second day.

 

Petra is known as the Rose-Red City for the colour of the rocks from which Petra is carved.

 

The Al-Khazneh (building that appears in "Indiana Jones"), for example, is a work of century 1 a.C .: made like real mausoleum.

 

Its façade, of Hellenistic inspiration, impresses by the dimensions: it is 43 meters of height by 30 of width.

 

At the top of one of the mountains surrounding Petra is another work of art: the Ad-Deir, another mausoleum, but which was used in the 5th century AD as a Byzantine church.

 

To visit it, you have to face 800 steps that lead to the top.

 

Petra was a powerful city. The Nabataeans put her on the route of the caravans that crossed the Arabian peninsula towards the Mediterranean or the Red Sea. They have developed irrigation systems and built dams to store rainwater that falls from time to time into the desert. In its peak, the place had 30 thousand inhabitants.

"Man is a rope stretched between animal and superman, a rope over the abyss."

 

Friedrich Nietzsche

 

***

 

A dramatic lookout about 200 meters above the entrance to the Siq.

  

***

  

Ancient ruins of Petra, Jordan:

 

When the ancient city of Petra reached its peak about 2,000 years ago, most of its structures were carved directly into the sandstone cliffs of the mountains of southern Jordan. Mostly used as tombs or temples, surprisingly, many of these structures are well preserved, including the most famous: Al Khazneh, the treasure of Petra, whose imposing facade emulates Greek and Roman architecture.

 

In addition to the incredible structures carved in the rocks and the immense temple complex, Petra also has a huge amphitheater carved into the hillside. With all this, it is not surprising that the name Petra comes from the Latin word "petrae", which means "rock".

Admiring the ancient ruins with fine hilltop views across Amman.

 

Two temples were apparently built on the Citadel during the 2nd century AD, with no other structures. The Temple of Hercules was built on the southern end during the reign of Marcus Aurelius (169-80). The columns were 33 ft tall and were originally part of a six-columned podium. The standing columns were re-erected by the American Center of Oriental Research in Amman.

True, I'm around the Dead Sea for the second time. What is the probability of getting heavy rains in this area? I will try to return to the beach tomorrow for the third time, but I will have to give up the Eastern Desert Castles, bordering Iraq.

 

***

 

Rainfall is scarcely 100 mm (4 in) per year in the northern part of the Dead Sea and barely 50 mm (2 in) in the southern part. The Dead Sea zone's aridity is due to the rainshadow effect of the Judaean Mountains. The highlands east of the Dead Sea receive more rainfall than the Dead Sea itself.

Tombs in the southern part of the city.

 

These Royal Tombs are particularly magnificent in the golden light of sunset.

 

Stand opposite the Royal Tombs at sunset to learn how Petra earned its nickname, Pink City.

Carved directly into vibrant red, white, pink, and sandstone cliff faces, the prehistoric Jordanian city of Petra was "lost" to the Western world for hundreds of years.

 

Located amid rugged desert canyons and mountains in what is now the southwestern corner of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Petra was once a thriving trading center and the capital of the Nabataean empire between 400 B.C. and A.D. 106.

 

The city sat empty and in near ruin for centuries. Only in the early 1800s did a European traveler disguise himself in Bedouin costume and infiltrate the mysterious locale.

 

In 1985, the Petra Archaeological Park was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site, and in 2007 it was named one of the new seven wonders of the world.

Love this dangerous road trip.

 

If you want to know the best of the country, it is good to prepare yourself for a trip of at least six-eight days. The territory is tiny and you can basically visit all the must-see things to do in Jordan from north to south in this time period. But we guarantee you will not regret it.

 

Only in Petra should you spend at least 48 hours such is the size and amount of incredible ruins there to see, trails to go and the nightly show to watch.

 

Near the ruins, also in the south, stands the unbelievable desert of Wadi Rum, with its red dunes, millennial inscriptions and a matador sunset.

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 79 80