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One more of the Sphinx moth from a different perspective. You can see the eye spot on the left wing. These spots are apparently shown to scare off preditors. This moth was too lethargic to care. We coaxed it onto the stick for photos. It was too early in the day and too cold for it to move around much. I have never seen one of these fly and at first glance you would almost think there is too much body mass for the wings to handle. They do fly however. View large for a lot of detail.

I believe this is a One-eyed Sphinx Moth (Smerinthus cerisyi).

 

In Explore - 25 May 2015 (#268)

 

As so often happens, I managed to get just a few photos (five) from this outing posted on Flickr. Other trips came along and I always seem to get so behind. This morning, I have added another four shots from this fun day with friends.

 

On 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess this was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. Unfortunately, there was some haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including a beautiful One Eyed Sphinx Moth.

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

I am SO stressed out! Just spent the last three hours, while a technician went through my whole computer remotely, deleting every virus that has accumulated. I was told that I phoned them just in time, as I was not far away from losing everything on my computer. I always have Norton installed on my computer, but apparently the last three months I have not had Network Security working on my computer. Can you believe I had 5,614 viruses and if I had reached 6,000, everything on my computer would have been lost? Yikes! Funny, as the last few days, I have been backing up my photos to external hard drives and a flash drive. A very costly morning, but now my computer is fine and I have a five-year Security. Just went to Google and discovered that all my endless bookmarks have disappeared ... sigh. Oh, well, I guess I start all over again - oh, they have all reappeared. Before all this, I was on Facebook and had clicked on a video link from a friend's Facebook page. Suddenly, my whole screen was filled with the Virus alert. I don't know if that link was the actual cause of all this problem, or if it was 'the last straw'. Thankful for the clear help from the technician! Much appreciated.

 

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On 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess this was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. Unfortunately, there was some haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (not the one in this photo), who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including a beautiful One Eyed Sphinx Moth.

 

www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Rufous_Hummingbird/overview

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

Yesterday, 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess yesterday was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. You can't tell too well in this photo, but the original version showed the haze that was over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (not the one posted today) down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including a One Eyed Sphinx Moth (photo posted this morning).

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

As so often happens, I managed to get just a few photos (five) from this outing posted on Flickr. Other trips came along and I always seem to get so behind. This morning, I have added another four shots from this fun day with friends.

 

On 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess yesterday was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. There was haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including a One Eyed Sphinx Moth.

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

A head on view of a One-eyed Sphinx moth. These furry little creatures are not as colorful as some moths, but are interesting none-the-less. I found many of these gathered where a light had been on all night. View large for all the fuzzy detail.

Hope I have the correct ID for this rather beautiful, large Moth. If anyone sees this image and is able to confirm or correct the ID, that would be so much appreciated.

 

Yesterday, 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess yesterday was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. There was haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (not the one posted today) down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including this One Eyed Sphinx Moth.

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

As so often happens, I managed to get just a few photos (five) from this outing posted on Flickr. Other trips came along and I always seem to get so behind. This morning, I have added another four shots from this fun day with friends.

 

On 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess yesterday was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. There was haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including a One Eyed Sphinx Moth.

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

As so often happens, I managed to get just a few photos (five) from this outing posted on Flickr. Other trips came along and I always seem to get so behind. This morning, I have added another four shots from this fun day with friends.

 

On 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess this was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. Unfortunately, there was some haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (not the one in this photo), who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including a beautiful One Eyed Sphinx Moth.

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

Wow, thunder, lightning and rain right now - going to turn off my computer!

 

Yesterday, 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess yesterday was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. Unfortunately, there was some haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (not the one in this photo) down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see this little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including a One Eyed Sphinx Moth (photo posted this morning).

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

"Barn Swallow pairs explore a number of potential nesting spots, flying up and hovering to investigate a location, then moving to another site before narrowing their choice. Preferred sites include eaves, rafters, and cross beams of barns, sheds and stables, as well as the undersides of bridges, wharfs, and culverts. They may also use nests from previous years, but avoid those infested heavily with mites or other parasites.

 

Both male and female build the nest cup using mud. They collect mud in their bills and often mix it with grass stems to make pellets. They first construct a small shelf to sit on, then build up the nest’s sides. If built against a wall or other vertical surface the result is a semicircular, half-cup shape. Nests built on top of a beam or other horizontal surface form a complete cup about 3 inches across at the rim and 2 inches deep. The birds line the cup first with grass, then feathers, and in colonies may steal nest-lining materials from neighboring nests. When reusing nests, Barn Swallows clean out old feathers and add new mud to the nest’s rim." From AllAboutBirds.

 

www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Barn_Swallow/lifehistory#nesting

 

Yesterday, 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess yesterday was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. There was haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (not the one posted today) down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including a One Eyed Sphinx Moth.

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

My last post of the One-eyed Sphinx Moth. I have no idea why they call it "One-eyed". If you look at my first post - the head on view - it is obvious they have two eyes. This view clearly shows the two eye spots on the wing that are shown to frighten predators. I had to gently spread the wings by applying light pressure to the back edges to get these spots to show. These critters only fly at night and submit to all sorts of handling by day. We never touched the wing surfaces or harmed this beautiful creature in any way other than interrupting it's sleep. View large to see how neatly it's hairy body was groomed.

West Pond, Parsonsfield, Maine.

 

Found this One Eyed Sphinx Moth on the porch today, it must have come visiting last night, attracted by our outside light.

This Sphinx Moth was photographed under the eves of my roof while riding out a storm. Photographed in Anderson, Northern California on 4/11/2012. The moth was ID'ed by DR. David James, John Davis, and Stewart Wechsler.

I discovered this moth on the sidewalk one day while I was walking from Children's Hospital Los Angeles to the Ronald McDonald House.

West Pond, Parsonsfield, Maine.

 

Found this One Eyed Sphinx Moth on the porch today, it must have come visiting last night, attracted by our outside light.

 

Note: Flickr will not let me add tags to this photo,.... WHY ???

  

Yesterday, 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess yesterday was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. There was haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (not the one posted today) down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including a One Eyed Sphinx Moth.

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

Every morning at our hotel, The Marathon Inn, on Grand Manan Island we were treated to a new display of moths attracted by the white exterior of the building and the porch lights which remained on throughout the night.

 

Grand Manan Island

New Brunswick, Canada

Can you see the face? One-eyed Sphinx Moth, Smerinthus cerisyi, in defensive posture to try and look like a bigger animal.

Pinehurst housing development, South Everett WA USA

One eyed sphinx moth, Smerinthus cerisyi, in my neighbor's garden.

One-eyed Sphinx or Cerisy's Sphinx (Smerinthus cerisyi)

One eyed sphinx moth, Smerinthus cerisyi, in my neighbor's garden.

One-eyed Sphinx Moth (Smerinthus ophthalmica). Mono County Park. Near Lee Vining, Mono Co., Calif.

If you're familiar with Soviet (and now Russian) aircraft design, you'll understand what I mean when I say this is what a moth would look like if it had been designed by Russian aeronautical engineers.

 

If not, I hope you will still find this moth interesting because of its unusual wings, curved body and huge head.

 

What's great about most moths as photographic subjects is they have their down time during the day, so with ordinary care it's usually possible to photograph a moth without scaring it away. Moths save their flitting and fluttering for after sunset.

 

Here we have a case of instinct trumping common sense. Instinct says to go to ground at sunrise. Common sense suggests finding a perch - say, a tree trunk, of which there are hundreds within 100 feet of this plain green siding - where that lovely and cunning gray and black camouflage would be an effective disguise.

 

I thought this could be a Hawk Moth, but flickrite byrdwatcher5 kindly ID'd it as a One Eyed Sphinx Moth. Thank you, byrdwatcher5!

The "eye" of the wing of a one-eyed sphinx moth (Smerinthus cerisyi)

 

© Katie LaSalle-Lowery

www.bigskycountry.net

 

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This Sphinx Moth was photographed under the eves of my roof while riding out a storm. Photographed in Anderson, Northern California on 4/11/2012. The moth was ID'ed by DR. David James, John Davis, and Stewart Wechsler.

One-eyed Sphinx Moth, Smerinthus cerisyi.

We have a mating pair of One-Eyed Sphinx Moths (Smerinthus ophthalmica), on our ornamental plant Catmint.

One-eyed Sphinx (Smerinthus cerisyi) Sphingid, warning pose, eye spots,

Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, Canada,

July 10, 2008

 

© Jay Cossey, Biodiversity Institute of Ontario. All rights reserved. Licensing available. Contact Jay Cossey, biobus1@gmail.com.

This Sphinx Moth was photographed under the eves of my roof while riding out a storm. Photographed in Anderson, Northern California on 4/11/2012. The moth was ID'ed by DR. David James, John Davis, and Stewart Wechsler.

One-eyed Sphinx or Cerisy's Sphinx (Smerinthus cerisyi)

Might be Smerinthus cerisyi.

Biggish, maybe 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) across. This is with flash; under normal daylight it looked like two shades of dark gray without the bluish and greenish tones.

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