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I believe this is a One-eyed Sphinx Moth (Smerinthus cerisyi).

 

In Explore - 25 May 2015 (#268)

 

Hope I have the correct ID for this rather beautiful, large Moth. If anyone sees this image and is able to confirm or correct the ID, that would be so much appreciated.

 

Yesterday, 9 July 2018, I went for a trip to Kananaskis with friends Shirley and Pam. This was planned as a bear hunt - but not a single bear was to be seen : ) As usual, when it comes to wildlife, it's all about timing. You can be lucky or unlucky, and I guess yesterday was not our lucky day, at least not as far as bears were concerned.

 

We left the city at 7:00 am to give ourselves the best chance. Within just a matter of minutes, we came upon a Great Blue Heron and a couple of Black-crowned Night-Herons, which was wonderful. Couldn't get good photos of them, just shots for the record. Our day was certainly starting off well.

 

We travelled to Kananaskis via Highway 1, but returned to the city along the south portion of Highway 40. When I go to Kananaskis on my own (only about three times so far), I only go south to Highway 40, never on Highway 1. I believe it takes about the same time to drive either way.

 

No sign of a bear, anywhere, but of course, we were surrounded by spectacular scenery all day. We had great weather, with a high of about 27C. There was haze over the mountains.

 

One of our stops was at Peninsular, at Lower Kananaskis Lake. Such a peaceful spot, with just a handful of people fishing and several people in canoes or kayaks. The main thing we saw there was a Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel (not the one posted today) down on the rocks.

 

Another place we wanted to get to was the area where the Pikas can be seen. For the first while, we began to think that we were going to be out of luck. Fortunately, one little Pika did eventually show itself and we were able to get a few photos. When I don't get photos that I'm quite happy with, it is a huge incentive to drive myself out there for another chance. While we were there, we did see a little Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, who was happily munching on Yellow Columbine flowers. Surprisingly, no Mountain Sheep were to be seen, here or anywhere else on this day.

 

A final stopping place was on the way home along Highway 40. We had forgotten that this place is closed on Mondays. I remember last year, when I drove out there myself, I had been banking on buying a sandwich for my lunch and for getting gas for my car. However, we did see at least two tiny Hummingbirds there, nesting Barn Swallows, and several interesting moths that I had never seen before, including this One Eyed Sphinx Moth.

 

So, all together, an interesting, fun day spent in good company. We are so very lucky to live within reach of such a breathtaking area!

Can you see the face? One-eyed Sphinx Moth, Smerinthus cerisyi, in defensive posture to try and look like a bigger animal.

Every morning at our hotel, The Marathon Inn, on Grand Manan Island we were treated to a new display of moths attracted by the white exterior of the building and the porch lights which remained on throughout the night.

 

Grand Manan Island

New Brunswick, Canada

reminds me of an old japanese samurai helmet.

 

this moth ended up on my hand while I was pruning english ivy off the old shed.

 

a view of the wings www.flickr.com/photos/curioustangles/18030598065/in/photo...

 

One-eyed Sphinx, Smerinthus cerisyi.

coastal pacific northwest, vancouver, surrey, bc

One eyed sphinx moth, Smerinthus cerisyi, in my neighbor's garden.

One-eyed Sphinx or Cerisy's Sphinx (Smerinthus cerisyi)

One eyed sphinx moth, Smerinthus cerisyi, in my neighbor's garden.

this moth ended up on my hand while I was pruning english ivy off the old shed.

 

a closer view of the "eyes" www.flickr.com/photos/curioustangles/18030598065/in/photo...

 

One-eyed Sphinx, Smerinthus cerisyi.

coastal pacific northwest, vancouver, surrey, bc

If you're familiar with Soviet (and now Russian) aircraft design, you'll understand what I mean when I say this is what a moth would look like if it had been designed by Russian aeronautical engineers.

 

If not, I hope you will still find this moth interesting because of its unusual wings, curved body and huge head.

 

What's great about most moths as photographic subjects is they have their down time during the day, so with ordinary care it's usually possible to photograph a moth without scaring it away. Moths save their flitting and fluttering for after sunset.

 

Here we have a case of instinct trumping common sense. Instinct says to go to ground at sunrise. Common sense suggests finding a perch - say, a tree trunk, of which there are hundreds within 100 feet of this plain green siding - where that lovely and cunning gray and black camouflage would be an effective disguise.

 

I thought this could be a Hawk Moth, but flickrite byrdwatcher5 kindly ID'd it as a One Eyed Sphinx Moth. Thank you, byrdwatcher5!

Thread-waisted wasp with prey, a paralyzed one-eyed sphinx larva, in Santa Barbara County, California.

The "eye" of the wing of a one-eyed sphinx moth (Smerinthus cerisyi)

 

© Katie LaSalle-Lowery

www.bigskycountry.net

 

framed & unframed prints, stretched canvas prints & greeting cards available:

katie-lasallelowery.artistwebsites.com/

 

Observed during this morning's asparagus harvest.

looks elephantish

this moth ended up on my hand while I was pruning english ivy off the old shed.

One-eyed Sphinx, Smerinthus cerisyi.

coastal pacific northwest, vancouver, surrey, bc

One-eyed Sphinx Moth, Smerinthus cerisyi.

Thread-waisted wasp with prey, a paralyzed one-eyed sphinx larva, in Santa Barbara County, California.

One-eyed Sphinx or Cerisy's Sphinx [Smerinthus cerisyi]

this moth ended up on my hand while I was pruning english ivy off the old shed.

 

a view of the wings www.flickr.com/photos/curioustangles/18030598065/in/photo...

 

One-eyed Sphinx, Smerinthus cerisyi.

coastal pacific northwest, vancouver, surrey, bc

The ID is a bit shaky on this guy, as there are so many variations on Sphinx caterpillar instars that look similar, so if anyone can correct me, please do! I found two of these at Meaher State Park yesterday, along with three more Snowberry Clearwing caterpillars!

An unusual moth found in a rest area near Wickenburg, AZ. If you look at this one large, you may see a fox face peering back, as I imagined. I would like to add this to the flickr group that is a field guide to North American Butterflies and Moths here, so any ID help would be appreciated. My great thanks to you Wrobel, for the ID and tags on this moth! Very cool to have your help on this. My brother will be so happy to see this image when he returns from his trip. He raised moths in our family home, and I serendipitously learned more than I thought at the time. Yeah!

Incline Village, Washoe Co., NV USA July 18

 

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I had two beautiful sphinx moths at the blacklight last night that I don't think I've ever seen before.

This one came later in the night, and was a bit less chaotic. He has eyespots under the wings that unfortunately he wouldn't show for the photo.

One-eyed Sphinx. Photographed at Wilson Tract, Norfolk County, Ontario on 2 June 2018.

One-eyed Sphinx (Smerinthus cerisyi) at Mono Lake, Mono County, California, USA

Sphinx moth (most likely smerinthus cerisyi)

© Denis Dumoulin 2010- Tous droits réservés

 

Not sure of the ID on this moth, but I found it attached to a shed door after I left the light on all night. I was able to touch the wing and know that the top side of the under wing is redish with an eye spot. I think this is a One-eyed Sphinx. They have been identified in the county where I found this one. Most others species of Sphinx have not. If my ID is wrong and someone can correct me, I welcome your input.

Sphinx moth (most likely smerinthus cerisyi)

It was kinda creepy...this huge Moth (and so many others) hung around our wine bottle all night, in fact, so many came around that night, that they smothered a few of our candles! (It was the night before the infamous tree-falling-on-our-trailer night:))

All they do is eat, poop and sleep.

© Denis Dumoulin 2010- Tous droits réservés

 

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