new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged akira+kurosawa

Day3 in BORACAY

at seven o'clock for Luc

This picture was inspired by Akira Kurosawa's black-and-white movie "Samurai-sanjuro".

A Day of Romance In A Berlin Snow Globe

Y tambien un tributo a los marcos del maestro Leo Cobo...je je je

LEO COBO

www.flickr.com/photos/leocobo/

 

MUCHO MEJOR EN GRANDE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

View On Black

 

American History X Trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=KWFp5EOFJU8

 

Pulp Fiction Trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=wZBfmBvvotE

Kill Bill - Trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=-czwy-aVbbU

Kill Bill Vol. 2 - Trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=NSR7xRGBnOE&feature=related

Easy Rider Trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=8XJjvrB7CMw

 

24 Hour Party People (2002) trailerwww.flickr.com/photos/leocobo/

es.youtube.com/watch?v=MyinarfzXUE

 

Alien, el octavo pasajero

es.youtube.com/watch?v=xC1ALI0_hqg

The Lord Of The Rings.The Fellowship of the Ring

es.youtube.com/watch?v=ghdBfZqSvTo&feature=PlayList&a...

Match Point Trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=j_t0c3Ag5Xg

Amarcord Trailer (Federico Fellini, 1962)

es.youtube.com/watch?v=BtG9ZM-ZHnY

Los Hermanos Marx En El Oste (Go West) Escena Estación

es.youtube.com/watch?v=_yUqhYiaJEo&feature=PlayList&a...

The Godfather trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=o_DEzxd2R3Y

Dersu Uzala (Akira Kurosawa, 1975) Trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=VnWMaTLzLcg

Night Of The Living Dead Trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=5gUKvmOEGCU

Sin City - Theatrical trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=IwIlEu7o9ZM

300 - Movie Trailer

es.youtube.com/watch?v=wDiUG52ZyHQ

Apocalypse Now Original Trailer (RARE)

es.youtube.com/watch?v=Tt0xxAMTp8M&feature=related

Trailer "El Resplandor"

The shining

es.youtube.com/watch?v=ykFmuzE7Nzs

 

......Y MUCHAS MUCHISIMAS MAS!!!!!

......AND MANY MORE.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thank you for visiting - ❤ with gratitude! Fave if you like it, add comments below, get beautiful HDR prints at qualityHDR.com.

 

We had nice clouds after some rain in the Silicon Valley. I headed to Alviso and I waited at the Amtrak train tracks for a train.

 

In Japanese, どですかでん (dodeskaden) is the sound a train makes when racing over tracks. I remembered this old film of the same name directed by Akira Kurosawa.

 

I processed a balanced HDR photo from a RAW long exposure, and carefully pulled the curves.

 

-- © Peter Thoeny, CC BY-NC-SA 4.0, HDR, 1 RAW exposure, NEX-6, _DSC5777_hdr1bal1h

A capture from ‘Throne of Blood,’ Akira Kurosawa’s adaptation of MacBeth.

The Velocity of Falling Blossom

七十年も前の事ですが、東郷寺は黒沢明の映画「羅生門」のモデルになったそうです。この門は河岸段丘の上にあります。河岸段丘の下にある参道から見上げると門の背景には空しかなく美しいシルエットが出来ます。なので黒沢明も荒廃した都にぽつんと立つ羅生門のイメージに近いと思ったのかもしれません。

thefunambulist.net/cinema/cinema-rashomon-by-akira-kurosawa

Seventy years ago, Togoji was the model of Akira Kurosawa's movie "Rashomon".

This gate is located on the river terrace.

Looking up from the approach below the river terrace, there is only sky behind the gate. And you can see the beautiful silhouette.

So Kurosawa Akira may have thought that the image of Rashomon standing in the devastated city is close.

_fotogramma: Seven Samurai /Akira Kurosawa /1954

ArtisticoWork

_piXpicta2018/09

_CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

_original file: 4400x2475pixel

---- sea photography ----

 

.... this is not a report....but it is only a collection of images taken a few days ago in Sicily and that, in some way, also speaks of Sicily ... (we are living in our island, a very fine "long summer") ...

  

---------------------------------------------------------

  

the slideshow

  

Qi Bo's photos on Flickriver

  

Qi Bo's photos on FlickeFlu

  

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Rhapsody in August-Akira Kurosawa

 

Rhapsody in August-Akira Kurosawa

 

Rhapsody in August-Akira Kurosawa

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   

These beautiful, delicate trees were first made famous in Akira Kurosawa's film 'Dreams' and then in a series of images by Michael Kenna. They are oft-photographed, but here is my take on them.

 

Hokkaido, Japan

 

I wrote a blog post about my trip to Hokkaido if you'd like to know more about the trip. As well, if you'd like, take a look at all my images from two trips to Japan .

 

Website | Blog | Instagram |

Ethiopia 2017, kentmere 1600

www.bawgaj.eu

“Man is a genius when he is dreaming.”

― Akira Kurosawa

 

Olympus OM-1

Zuiko 50mm

Fujifilm Superia X-TRA 400

Convert to B&W in Mac.

Inspired by Akira Kurosawa films. Test shot for a short I'm making.

La Vallée de Joux

Lac Brenet (Le Pont ) At winter 2007

En hiver 2007 Switzerland

A Lotus Flower in Black & White II

♈ 2020 / Haut-Rhin, France

 

_K004753 + _K004754

For Ted McGraths sketchbook class - we were assigned to make a film poster using elements and ideas from our sketchbook. This image is based on the first vignette from one of my favorite movies, Kurosawa's Dreams.

George Lucas's creation of R2-D2 was influenced by Akira Kurosawa's 1958 feature film The Hidden Fortress. Lucas and artist Ralph McQuarrie also drew inspiration from the robots Huey, Dewey, and Louie from Douglas Trumbull's 1972 film Silent Running. This 'concept sketch' was created by McQuarrie in 1975 with red & graphite pencil on vellum and became the basis for R2-D2 (which stands for Second Generation Robotic Droid Series-2).

 

This photograph was taken at the Star Wars and the Power of Costume exhibit which explores the challenges in dressing the Star Wars universe from the Galactic Senate and royalty to the Jedi, Sith, and Droids. Features of this exhibit included short films that provide a behind-the-scenes look at the creative process and included interviews with the designers and actors/actresses. The experience is also enhanced by interactive flip books featuring sketches, photographs, and notes that capture the creative team’s inspiration and vision.

 

The best way to view my photostream is through Flickriver with the link below:

www.flickriver.com/photos/photojourney57/

Inspired by akira kurosawa movie "Dreams" 1990

...the snow is warm, the ice is hot...

 

Akira Kurosawa

門の反対に回ってみると東郷寺がシルエットになっていました。

黒澤明はひょっとしてこんな風景を見て羅生門をイメージしたのかと....

When I went to the opposite of the gate, Togo-ji was in silhouette.

I felt that Akira Kurosawa who saw such a scene might have imagined Rashomon ...

 

When I'was walking,

I fall into the illusion that

field warrior who wear the armor that appear in the movie ( Seven Samurai )( Directed Akira Kurosawa )go on a horse and run through.

L’uomo è un genio quando sta sognando.

(Akira Kurosawa)

Taken in Azumino, Nagano Pref., Japan.

This waterwheel mill was used for one of Akira Kurosawa's movies.

Source : 2018-11-12 - 17.09.03 - 5D3_1020 - 2.jpg

 

C'est l'un des plus anciens bâtiments du Japon médiéval. Inscrit au patrimoine mondial de l'UNESCO et désigné comme trésor culturel du Japon, avec Matsumoto-jō et Kumamoto-jō, c'est l'un des douze seuls châteaux japonais dont les donjons en bois soient encore existants (les autres ont été reconstruits après l'époque féodale, souvent dans les années 1960-1970). Il est aussi connu sous les sobriquets de « Hakuro-jô » ou « Shirasagi-jō » (白鷺城 = château du Héron blanc ou de l'aigrette blanche) en raison de sa couleur blanche et aussi par opposition aux deux autres célèbres châteaux d'Okayama (donjon reconstruit) et de Matsumoto (donjon authentique), tous deux de couleur noire.

 

Seul château japonais à être aussi bien conservé (donjon et murailles), le château de Himeji est le lieu de tournage des scènes extérieures de nombreuses fictions historiques ainsi que de certains films célèbres, comme "Ran" et "Kagemusha", d'Akira Kurosawa, ou encore "On ne vit que deux fois", un James Bond de 1967 !

Olympus OM-1

Zuiko 50mm

Fujifilm Superia X-TRA 400

Convert to B&W in Mac.

Himeji Castle 姫路城 ( UNESCO World Heritage Site )

 

www.eyeem.com/u/macononch

 

This castle is well- known as “Shirasagi-jo”, which means White Heron Castle or White Egret Castle in Japanese due to its brilliant white exterior and its resemblance to a heron (or egret) taking flight. :)

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Himeji Castle (姫路城 Himeji-jō) is a hilltop Japanese castle complex located in Himeji, in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. The castle is regarded as the finest surviving example of prototypical Japanese castle architecture, comprising a network of 83 buildings with advanced defensive systems from the feudal period. The castle is frequently known as Hakuro-jō ("White Egret Castle") or Shirasagi-jō ("White Heron Castle") because of its brilliant white exterior and supposed resemblance to a bird taking flight.

 

Himeji Castle dates to 1333, when Akamatsu Norimura built a fort on top of Himeyama hill. The fort was dismantled and rebuilt as Himeyama Castle in 1346, and then remodeled into Himeji Castle two centuries later. Himeji Castle was then significantly remodeled in 1581 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who added a three-story castle keep. In 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded the castle to Ikeda Terumasa for his help in the Battle of Sekigahara, and Ikeda completely rebuilt the castle from 1601 to 1609, expanding it into a large castle complex. Several buildings were later added to the castle complex by Honda Tadamasa from 1617 to 1618. For over 400 years, Himeji Castle has remained intact, even throughout the extensive bombing of Himeji in World War II, and natural disasters such as the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake.

 

Himeji Castle is the largest and most visited castle in Japan, and it was registered in 1993 as one of the first UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the country. The area within the middle moat of the castle complex is a designated Special Historic Site and five structures of the castle are also designated National Treasures. Along with Matsumoto Castle and Kumamoto Castle, Himeji Castle is considered one of Japan's three premier castles. In order to preserve the castle buildings, it has been undergoing restoration work for several years but will open to the public again on March 27, 2015.

 

Burg Himeji

Die Burg Himeji (jap. 姫路城, Himeji-jō) befindet sich in der Stadt Himeji in der japanischen Präfektur Hyōgo.

 

Sie ist eines der ältesten erhaltenen Bauwerke aus dem Japan des 17. Jahrhunderts. Die Burganlage, die aus 83 einzelnen Gebäuden besteht, gilt als schönstes Beispiel des japanischen Burgenbaus und hat den Beinamen Shirasagijō (白鷺城, dt. „Weißer-Reiher-Burg“), eine Anspielung auf ihre weißen Außenmauern. Trotz ihrer architektonischen Schönheit, wie z. B. ihr spiralförmiger Grundriss, sind ihre Wehranlagen (nawabari) hoch entwickelt, so dass die Burg als praktisch uneinnehmbar galt.

 

Die Burg von Himeji gehört zu den nationalen Kulturschätzen Japans, wurde 1956 zur Besonderen historischen Stätte (tokubetsu shiseki) erklärt und 1993 von der UNESCO als Weltkulturerbe anerkannt.

 

Die Dächer und Wände der Burg werden von April 2010 bis März 2015 renoviert

 

Geschichte

 

Die ersten Gebäude der Burg wurden zu Beginn der Muromachi-Zeit im Jahr 1346 erbaut. Als Architekt gilt Akamatsu Sadanori, der zuvor den Shomyoji-Tempel am Fuße des Berges Himeji gebaut hat und an dessen Stelle nun die Burganlage entstand.

 

Die größte Erweiterung, die oft auch als eigentlicher Baubeginn Himeji-jōs bezeichnet wird, fand 1580 statt, als Toyotomi Hideyoshi die Burg übernahm und dreistöckige Burgtürme erbauen ließ.

 

Nach der Schlacht von Sekigahara fiel die Burg an Tokugawa Ieyasu, der sie kurz danach Ikeda Terumasa überließ. Dieser erweiterte die Anlage innerhalb einer achtjährigen Bauzeit von 1601 bis 1609 mit typischen Elementen aus der Momoyama-Zeit zu ihrer heutigen Form. Dabei errichtete er auch das fünfstöckige Hauptgebäude (天守閣, tenshukaku). Die letzte größere Erweiterung der Burg wird auf das Jahr 1618 datiert.

 

Die eigentliche Residenz wurde nach 1868 abgerissen, erhalten sind aber die Wehranlagen um den eindrucksvollen - aber nie zum Wohnen gedachten - tenshukaku.

 

Auf Ikeda folgten:

Honda (1617–1639)

Okudaira (1639–1648)

Matsudaira (1648–1649)

Sakakibara (1648–1667)

Matsudaira (1667–1684)

Sakakibara (1684–1704)

Honda (1704–1741)

Matsudaira (1741–1749)

Sakai (1749–1868) mit einem Einkommen von 155.000 Koku.

 

Am Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges wurde Himeji-jō bombardiert, überstand dies jedoch nahezu unbeschädigt.

 

Himeji-jō diente bereits mehrfach als Filmkulisse für international bekannte Produktionen: Im James-Bond-Film Man lebt nur zweimal (1967) wurde es als Hauptquartier der Japanischen Geheimpolizei gezeigt, im Jahr (1980) war das Schloss in James Clavells Shogun zu sehen unter dem Pseudonym Schloss Osaka, ein beträchtlicher Teil des Films Ran (1985) des japanischen Regisseurs Akira Kurosawa spielt dort, und auch Szenen des Samurai-Epos Last Samurai (2003) wurden dort gedreht.

  

Castillo Himeji

姫路城

 

Ubicación

Himeji, Prefectura de Hyōgo, Japón

 

Época de construcción

1346

El Castillo Himeji (姫路城 Himeji-jō) es un castillo japonés localizado en la ciudad costera de Himeji en la prefectura de Hyōgo (antiguo distrito de Shikito en la provincia de Harima), a unos 47 km al oeste de Kōbe. Es una de las estructuras más antiguas del Japón medieval que aún sobrevive en buenas condiciones; fue designado como Patrimonio de la Humanidad1 por la Unesco en 1993, también es un sitio histórico especial de Japón2 y un Tesoro Nacional. Junto con el Castillo Matsumoto y el Castillo Kumamoto, es uno de los "Tres Famosos Castillos" de Japón, y es el más visitado del país. Se le conoce a veces con el nombre de Hakuro-jō o Shirasagi-jō ("Castillo de la garza blanca") debido al color blanco brillante de su exterior.

 

El castillo aparece frecuentemente en la televisión japonesa, como escenario de películas y series de ficción, debido a que el Castillo Edo en Tokio actualmente no posee una torre principal similar a la que tiene el Castillo Himeji. Es un punto de referencia muy usado dentro de la ciudad de Himeji, ya que al estar emplazado el castillo sobre una colina, puede ser vista desde gran parte de la ciudad.

 

Vista de la torre principal desde el Honmaru. Se observa que son la agrupación de varias torres.

La torre principal (天守 tenshu) del castillo es una de las estructuras más grandes y emblemáticas del castillo, y considerada como una de las doce torres genson tenshu (現存天守) o torres que aún existen y son anteriores a la era Edo. Fue construida originalmente en la primavera de 1580 por Toyotomi Hideyoshi, al levantarse en la cima del monte Himeyama una gran torre con tres divisiones, pero durante el mandato de Ikeda Terumasa la torre principal fue desmantelada y se usaron los materiales para construir una de las torres menores.

La nueva torre principal fue construida por Terumasa y consiste en una gran torre principal (大天守 Daitenshu?) con 5 secciones de 6 pisos y una base, y un grupo de tres torres principales menores: Higashi-kotenshu (東小天守), Nishi-kotenshu (西小天守) e Inui-kotenshu (乾小天守?. Las torres están conectadas por varios watariyagura (渡櫓) de dos secciones, por lo que la organización de las torres siguen el estilo renritsushiki (連立式).

 

La techumbre de la torre está dispuesta al estilo irimoyazukuri (入母屋造り), es decir, que sus techos poseen gabletes con tejados a cuatro aguas. En la torre existen dos tipos de gabletes: el karahafu (唐破風) de estilo chino Tang y los cuales son gabletes ondulados con forma de arco, y el chidorihafu (千鳥破風), que son gabletes triangulares de forma curva cóncava, lo que permite que la estructura sea también una torre vigía; adicionalmente, los techos que están puestos en cada piso equilibran y distribuyen el peso de la torre. Los muros de la torre principal están cubiertos con un mortero blanco especial llamado shiroshikkui sōnurigome (白漆喰総塗籠), que las hace resistentes al fuego y a los disparos de arcabuz, a la vez que brinda una bella apariencia a la estructura. En la gran torre principal se ubican dos pilares principales hechos de madera y dispuestos en las secciones este y oeste, abarcando desde la base de la torre hasta el sexto piso, ambos tienen un diámetro de 95 cm y una altura de 24,6 m.

 

En los exteriores de la torre, aparte del techado irimoyazukuri, se ubican las ventanas, que en realidad son celosías con fines de protección, con la excepción de la segunda sección de la cara sur de la torre mayor, en donde debajo del tejado karahafu existe una "celosía de proyección" (出格子 dekōshi?), que es una ventana saliente hecha para lanzar flechas y repeler al enemigo. En las torres Nishi-kotenshu e Inui-kotenshu las ventanas de celosía ubicadas en los pisos superiores tienen forma de campana (火灯窓 katōmado).

 

La torre principal se yergue en la cima del monte Himeyama (a 45,6 metros sobre el nivel del mar), y de ésta se proyecta la base, que mide 14,85 metros de altura, y luego la edificación que tiene una altura máxima de 31,5 metros, por lo que la torre principal se proyecta hasta los 92 metros de altura. El peso bruto de la torre oscila las 5.700 toneladas, aunque previa a la "gran restauración de Shōwa" el peso de éste oscilaba las 6.200 toneladas.

 

Château de Himeji

Le château de Himeji (姫路城, Himeji-jō?) est un château japonais situé à Himeji dans la préfecture de Hyōgo.

 

C'est l'une des plus vieilles structures du Japon médiéval. Inscrit au patrimoine mondial de l'UNESCO et désigné comme trésor culturel du Japon, avec Matsumoto-jō et Kumamoto-jō, c'est l'un des trois seuls châteaux japonais en bois encore existants. Il est aussi connu sous le nom de « Shirasagi-jō » (château du Héron blanc) en raison de sa couleur blanche extérieure.

 

Le château de Himeji apparaît souvent à la télévision japonaise. La raison en est simple, lorsque le tournage d'une fiction doit avoir lieu (Abarenbō Shōgun (en) par exemple), les producteurs se tournent naturellement vers cette merveille qui est la seule aussi bien conservée. C'est également le lieu où ont été tournées les scènes extérieures de Ran ou encore de Kagemusha deux célèbres films d'Akira Kurosawa. Le château apparaît aussi dans le film de James Bond On ne vit que deux fois (1967).

 

Depuis le 26 mars 2011, le château est en cours de rénovation. Il n'est pas possible de visiter le bâtiment principal, le donjon, daitenshu 大天守. Seuls les chemins l'entourant ainsi que le grand parc au pied du château sont ouverts au public.

 

Les échafaudages qui empêchaient de voir le bâtiment principal ont été enlevés le 14 janvier 2014 mais on ne peut toujours pas visiter l'intérieur du château tant que sa rénovation est en cours. Sa réouverture au public est prévue pour le 27 mars 20151,2.

  

- Wikipedia

 

ƒ/5.0 37.0 mm 8 sec ISO200

Date and Time (Original) - 2016:06:21 20:29

   

Recreation of a scene from one of my favorite films, "Ikiru" starring Takashi Shimura and Seiji Miyaguchi. Directed by Akira Kurosawa, master of the black and white image.e

地元では有名な、でも入ったことはない喫茶店。

same cafe in this photo. in my hometown

akira kurosawa came here a few times when he took his movie @ mt.fuji.

 

lomo lca

solaris fg plus 100iso

 

favorites posting tumblr

my photo tumblr

The We're Here challenge for today is on the theme of Japanese Cinema.

 

This is a still from 'Seven Saveloy' which was the ill-fated sausage remake of Akira Kurosawa's masterpiece 'Seven Samurai'. Sadly, it never got beyond concept stage and instead Hollywood remade Seven Samurai as the non-pork-based 'The Magnificent Seven'. Incidentally, in this photograph, the saveloy on the left is the James Coburn character, even though it actually looks more like Yul Brynner. In fact, they all look like Yul Brynner. Or perhaps it is fairer to say that Yul Brynner looked more like a sausage. There are rumours that 'Seven Saveloy' may finally be made for Netflix by Adam Sandler.

location : western side of Himeji Castle ,Himeji city,Hyogo Prefecture, Japan

 

World Cultural Heritage Site

National Treasure

  

Himeji Castle 姫路城 ( UNESCO World Heritage Site )

 

Himeji Castle (姫路城 Himeji-jō) is a hilltop Japanese castle complex located in Himeji, in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. The castle is regarded as the finest surviving example of prototypical Japanese castle architecture, comprising a network of 83 buildings with advanced defensive systems from the feudal period. The castle is frequently known as Hakuro-jō ("White Egret Castle") or Shirasagi-jō ("White Heron Castle") because of its brilliant white exterior and supposed resemblance to a bird taking flight.

 

Himeji Castle dates to 1333, when Akamatsu Norimura built a fort on top of Himeyama hill. The fort was dismantled and rebuilt as Himeyama Castle in 1346, and then remodeled into Himeji Castle two centuries later. Himeji Castle was then significantly remodeled in 1581 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who added a three-story castle keep. In 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded the castle to Ikeda Terumasa for his help in the Battle of Sekigahara, and Ikeda completely rebuilt the castle from 1601 to 1609, expanding it into a large castle complex. Several buildings were later added to the castle complex by Honda Tadamasa from 1617 to 1618. For over 400 years, Himeji Castle has remained intact, even throughout the extensive bombing of Himeji in World War II, and natural disasters such as the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake.

 

Himeji Castle is the largest and most visited castle in Japan, and it was registered in 1993 as one of the first UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the country. The area within the middle moat of the castle complex is a designated Special Historic Site and five structures of the castle are also designated National Treasures. Along with Matsumoto Castle and Kumamoto Castle, Himeji Castle is considered one of Japan's three premier castles. In order to preserve the castle buildings, it has been undergoing restoration work for several years but will open to the public again on March 27, 2015.

 

Burg Himeji

Die Burg Himeji (jap. 姫路城, Himeji-jō) befindet sich in der Stadt Himeji in der japanischen Präfektur Hyōgo.

 

Sie ist eines der ältesten erhaltenen Bauwerke aus dem Japan des 17. Jahrhunderts. Die Burganlage, die aus 83 einzelnen Gebäuden besteht, gilt als schönstes Beispiel des japanischen Burgenbaus und hat den Beinamen Shirasagijō (白鷺城, dt. „Weißer-Reiher-Burg“), eine Anspielung auf ihre weißen Außenmauern. Trotz ihrer architektonischen Schönheit, wie z. B. ihr spiralförmiger Grundriss, sind ihre Wehranlagen (nawabari) hoch entwickelt, so dass die Burg als praktisch uneinnehmbar galt.

 

Die Burg von Himeji gehört zu den nationalen Kulturschätzen Japans, wurde 1956 zur Besonderen historischen Stätte (tokubetsu shiseki) erklärt und 1993 von der UNESCO als Weltkulturerbe anerkannt.

 

Die Dächer und Wände der Burg werden von April 2010 bis März 2015 renoviert

 

Geschichte

 

Die ersten Gebäude der Burg wurden zu Beginn der Muromachi-Zeit im Jahr 1346 erbaut. Als Architekt gilt Akamatsu Sadanori, der zuvor den Shomyoji-Tempel am Fuße des Berges Himeji gebaut hat und an dessen Stelle nun die Burganlage entstand.

 

Die größte Erweiterung, die oft auch als eigentlicher Baubeginn Himeji-jōs bezeichnet wird, fand 1580 statt, als Toyotomi Hideyoshi die Burg übernahm und dreistöckige Burgtürme erbauen ließ.

 

Nach der Schlacht von Sekigahara fiel die Burg an Tokugawa Ieyasu, der sie kurz danach Ikeda Terumasa überließ. Dieser erweiterte die Anlage innerhalb einer achtjährigen Bauzeit von 1601 bis 1609 mit typischen Elementen aus der Momoyama-Zeit zu ihrer heutigen Form. Dabei errichtete er auch das fünfstöckige Hauptgebäude (天守閣, tenshukaku). Die letzte größere Erweiterung der Burg wird auf das Jahr 1618 datiert.

 

Die eigentliche Residenz wurde nach 1868 abgerissen, erhalten sind aber die Wehranlagen um den eindrucksvollen - aber nie zum Wohnen gedachten - tenshukaku.

 

Auf Ikeda folgten:

Honda (1617–1639)

Okudaira (1639–1648)

Matsudaira (1648–1649)

Sakakibara (1648–1667)

Matsudaira (1667–1684)

Sakakibara (1684–1704)

Honda (1704–1741)

Matsudaira (1741–1749)

Sakai (1749–1868) mit einem Einkommen von 155.000 Koku.

 

Am Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges wurde Himeji-jō bombardiert, überstand dies jedoch nahezu unbeschädigt.

 

Himeji-jō diente bereits mehrfach als Filmkulisse für international bekannte Produktionen: Im James-Bond-Film Man lebt nur zweimal (1967) wurde es als Hauptquartier der Japanischen Geheimpolizei gezeigt, im Jahr (1980) war das Schloss in James Clavells Shogun zu sehen unter dem Pseudonym Schloss Osaka, ein beträchtlicher Teil des Films Ran (1985) des japanischen Regisseurs Akira Kurosawa spielt dort, und auch Szenen des Samurai-Epos Last Samurai (2003) wurden dort gedreht.

  

Castillo Himeji

姫路城

 

Ubicación

Himeji, Prefectura de Hyōgo, Japón

 

Época de construcción

1346

El Castillo Himeji (姫路城 Himeji-jō) es un castillo japonés localizado en la ciudad costera de Himeji en la prefectura de Hyōgo (antiguo distrito de Shikito en la provincia de Harima), a unos 47 km al oeste de Kōbe. Es una de las estructuras más antiguas del Japón medieval que aún sobrevive en buenas condiciones; fue designado como Patrimonio de la Humanidad1 por la Unesco en 1993, también es un sitio histórico especial de Japón2 y un Tesoro Nacional. Junto con el Castillo Matsumoto y el Castillo Kumamoto, es uno de los "Tres Famosos Castillos" de Japón, y es el más visitado del país. Se le conoce a veces con el nombre de Hakuro-jō o Shirasagi-jō ("Castillo de la garza blanca") debido al color blanco brillante de su exterior.

 

El castillo aparece frecuentemente en la televisión japonesa, como escenario de películas y series de ficción, debido a que el Castillo Edo en Tokio actualmente no posee una torre principal similar a la que tiene el Castillo Himeji. Es un punto de referencia muy usado dentro de la ciudad de Himeji, ya que al estar emplazado el castillo sobre una colina, puede ser vista desde gran parte de la ciudad.

 

Vista de la torre principal desde el Honmaru. Se observa que son la agrupación de varias torres.

La torre principal (天守 tenshu) del castillo es una de las estructuras más grandes y emblemáticas del castillo, y considerada como una de las doce torres genson tenshu (現存天守) o torres que aún existen y son anteriores a la era Edo. Fue construida originalmente en la primavera de 1580 por Toyotomi Hideyoshi, al levantarse en la cima del monte Himeyama una gran torre con tres divisiones, pero durante el mandato de Ikeda Terumasa la torre principal fue desmantelada y se usaron los materiales para construir una de las torres menores.

La nueva torre principal fue construida por Terumasa y consiste en una gran torre principal (大天守 Daitenshu?) con 5 secciones de 6 pisos y una base, y un grupo de tres torres principales menores: Higashi-kotenshu (東小天守), Nishi-kotenshu (西小天守) e Inui-kotenshu (乾小天守?. Las torres están conectadas por varios watariyagura (渡櫓) de dos secciones, por lo que la organización de las torres siguen el estilo renritsushiki (連立式).

 

La techumbre de la torre está dispuesta al estilo irimoyazukuri (入母屋造り), es decir, que sus techos poseen gabletes con tejados a cuatro aguas. En la torre existen dos tipos de gabletes: el karahafu (唐破風) de estilo chino Tang y los cuales son gabletes ondulados con forma de arco, y el chidorihafu (千鳥破風), que son gabletes triangulares de forma curva cóncava, lo que permite que la estructura sea también una torre vigía; adicionalmente, los techos que están puestos en cada piso equilibran y distribuyen el peso de la torre. Los muros de la torre principal están cubiertos con un mortero blanco especial llamado shiroshikkui sōnurigome (白漆喰総塗籠), que las hace resistentes al fuego y a los disparos de arcabuz, a la vez que brinda una bella apariencia a la estructura. En la gran torre principal se ubican dos pilares principales hechos de madera y dispuestos en las secciones este y oeste, abarcando desde la base de la torre hasta el sexto piso, ambos tienen un diámetro de 95 cm y una altura de 24,6 m.

 

En los exteriores de la torre, aparte del techado irimoyazukuri, se ubican las ventanas, que en realidad son celosías con fines de protección, con la excepción de la segunda sección de la cara sur de la torre mayor, en donde debajo del tejado karahafu existe una "celosía de proyección" (出格子 dekōshi?), que es una ventana saliente hecha para lanzar flechas y repeler al enemigo. En las torres Nishi-kotenshu e Inui-kotenshu las ventanas de celosía ubicadas en los pisos superiores tienen forma de campana (火灯窓 katōmado).

 

La torre principal se yergue en la cima del monte Himeyama (a 45,6 metros sobre el nivel del mar), y de ésta se proyecta la base, que mide 14,85 metros de altura, y luego la edificación que tiene una altura máxima de 31,5 metros, por lo que la torre principal se proyecta hasta los 92 metros de altura. El peso bruto de la torre oscila las 5.700 toneladas, aunque previa a la "gran restauración de Shōwa" el peso de éste oscilaba las 6.200 toneladas.

 

Château de Himeji

Le château de Himeji (姫路城, Himeji-jō?) est un château japonais situé à Himeji dans la préfecture de Hyōgo.

 

C'est l'une des plus vieilles structures du Japon médiéval. Inscrit au patrimoine mondial de l'UNESCO et désigné comme trésor culturel du Japon, avec Matsumoto-jō et Kumamoto-jō, c'est l'un des trois seuls châteaux japonais en bois encore existants. Il est aussi connu sous le nom de « Shirasagi-jō » (château du Héron blanc) en raison de sa couleur blanche extérieure.

 

Le château de Himeji apparaît souvent à la télévision japonaise. La raison en est simple, lorsque le tournage d'une fiction doit avoir lieu (Abarenbō Shōgun (en) par exemple), les producteurs se tournent naturellement vers cette merveille qui est la seule aussi bien conservée. C'est également le lieu où ont été tournées les scènes extérieures de Ran ou encore de Kagemusha deux célèbres films d'Akira Kurosawa. Le château apparaît aussi dans le film de James Bond On ne vit que deux fois (1967).

 

Depuis le 26 mars 2011, le château est en cours de rénovation. Il n'est pas possible de visiter le bâtiment principal, le donjon, daitenshu 大天守. Seuls les chemins l'entourant ainsi que le grand parc au pied du château sont ouverts au public.

 

Les échafaudages qui empêchaient de voir le bâtiment principal ont été enlevés le 14 janvier 2014 mais on ne peut toujours pas visiter l'intérieur du château tant que sa rénovation est en cours. Sa réouverture au public est prévue pour le 27 mars 20151,2.

  

- Wikipedia

 

This is the bridge that I take usually from the Louvre to my house

when I came back in the evening,

I never was attracted to stay there and picnik like other people

but I like to pass often by and take photos in both directions.

 

This days I have (between other problems) a strong cold which keep me

in home even more than usual.

 

few days ago on a art forum it was a question: which are our 5 favorites movies,

I have so many that I didn't answer to the question but I am thinking about all that.

 

I think that my all time favorite movie is Dodes'Kaden by Akira Kurosawa.

I find the DVD at the FNAC(the all books bookstores in Paris and more ...)

and yesterday I saw again the movie and I was glad to see the extra

interviews, etc.

 

First time I saw the movie at the first apparition, in 1971, in Romania

and I saw it a second time , years ago , here in France,

is strange but is a movie that I did remember very well from the beginning,

I find in it my own way to see life or very close to it.

 

I will recommend it to all the dreamers .

Explore 27.

This shot reminds me of a sequence from an Akira Kurosawa film called Kagemusha. It has a colour sequence that has the main character stumbling about a bizarre landscape in his dream. It always stuck with me and this just hinted at it. Definitely a weird and slightly unreal feel to this one. Taken just after the last post but facing in the opposite direction. It was one of those sunsets where everywhere you turn is another great shot but you can't make up your mind what to do because it is all happening at once.

Rocks and waves, always a joy to shoot :) Especially with a great sky. Have fun all and thanks for all of your comments, it keeps me going.

10-22mm, 0.6H and 0.6 s Lee filters.

 

Exposure: 2

Aperture: f/11.0

Focal Length: 12 mm

ISO Speed: 125

Exposure Bias: +2/3 EV

 

View On Black

Day Dreaming

 

Deadline time for me, so I have disabled the comments so I will not be distracted (as much). I'm a master at not quite getting on with what I should be doing.

 

If you are interested in how these pictures are made and have little else better to do with your time, then you may find this link helpful. If not, then so be it.

  

www.photofusion.org/salon14-event-photo-forum

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 51 52