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Seen on Christine Lake Hike in the Miette River valley, Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

 

The hillsides and valleys of Jasper are a sickly shade of copper red and orange, covered with stands of trees killed by the mountain pine beetle. Mountain pine beetle has always existed in Western Canada, but its appearance in the national park has been sudden to a casual observer like me.

 

In recent years, with populations of the bark-devouring insect fuelled by hot, dry summers, and unseasonably mild winters, the insect infestation has escalated and brought down more than 16 million hectares of forest!

 

Essentially pine beetle outbreaks are one of nature’s built-in mechanisms for climate change adaptation in natural forests. I believe this picture one day will serve as a historic record of the changing landscape.

 

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Runa Photography, Daniel © 2015

© All rights reserved, don´t use this image without my permission.

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Para Mirko mi primogénito, todo lo mejor en este día y que se cumplan todos tus sueños querido hijo.

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Climate change research in the tropical Andes on the effects of climate change on glacier melting and on the hydrology of the La Paz Valley extensively describes the possible impact of climate change on water resources in the metropolitan area of La Paz and El Alto, and thus on water provision for urban domestic uses. Eighty per cent of the glaciers in the Bolivian tropical Andes are melting, much has already disappeared and the Tuni-Condoriri system, important for water provision in the cities of La Paz and El Alto will disappear towards 2025 and 2045. These studies also provide information related to the water balance (precipitation, consumption, water losses) in the water systems of La Paz and El Alto.

 

Source: Gonzáles J, et al; Multi-stakeholder cost-benefit analysis of climate change adaptation measures and options: the case of urban water provision in the context of melting glaciers in Bolivia. (2013)

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Estuve en esta zona en abril de 2012 y se puede ver que los glaciares tanto del Huayna Potosí (cara oeste) y María Lloco disminuyeron significativamente. Sin embargo la precipitación pluvial en esta zona aumentó en la gestión 2014/2015.

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On Thursday, participants met in a plenary on disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation, followed by general plenary statements in morning and afternoon sessions. An informal plenary on the implementation of the outcomes of the Mid-term Review of the Hyogo Framework of Action (HPA) continued for a second day as well as a number of roundtables on managing watersheds, children for resilience, DRR and gender, DRR safety nets and mountains of risk. Winners of the UN Sasakawa Award for Disaster Risk Reduction were announced in an evening ceremony.

 

www.preventionweb.net/globalplatform/2011/announcements/v...

A 'king tide' event and high winds combine to produce a preview of future sea level rise. For those keeping score at home, Vancouver is one of the top 20 cities at risk from carbon-fueled sea level rise.

Soon after Trump took office – he spearheaded the Republican war on our climate, our health and our lives. One of the first steps that he took was to silence the National Park Service on social media. I follow them on Facebook and almost immediately after they were silenced a Alt National Park Service Facebook page popped up. I follow them too. Yesterday they published an overview of the Trump administrations 2017 acts against the environment and wildlife. The list is not yet complete and doesn’t mention things like the Bonn Climate Conference that was an absolute debacle. The list is difficult to read - they are working on a timeline for their website that will be launched next week. The list is breathtaking in scope and the intent is astonishing. Try to have a good day.

 

Play Projects

 

1.On January 20th, Trump silenced the National Park Service from using social media.

2.On January 20th, National Park Service starts a “resistance” movement on social media accounts.

3.On January 24th, Trump issues several memoranda aiming to hasten permitting from the Dakota Access and Keystone XL oil pipelines.

4.On February 1st, U.S. Senate confirms ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson as secretary of state.

5.On February 16th, Trump signs a joint resolution passed by Congress revoking the U.S. Department of the Interior’s “Stream Protection Rule.” The stream protection rule, which prevented mining companies dumping their waste into streams, is axed under the Congressional Review Act.

6.On February 17th, U.S. Senate confirms Scott Pruitt as the head of the U.S. EPA. In his prior role as Oklahoma’s attorney general, Pruitt frequently sued the EPA over its regulations, notably leading a 27-state lawsuit against the Clean Power Plan.

7.On February 28th, President Trump issues an executive order formally asking the EPA to review the “Waters of the United States” rule.

8.On March 2, U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke spends his first day on the job rescinding an Obama-era prohibition of lead ammunition on federal lands and waters. Also, the EPA, Scott Pruitt, canceled a requirement for reporting methane emissions.

9.On March 7th, EPA’s Office of Science and Technology removed the word “science” from its mission statement.

10.On March 9th, EPA administrator Scott Pruitt that carbon dioxide’s role in the Earth’s changing climate remains unclear.

11.On March 13th, White House releases its first preliminary budget under Trump. The budget outlines deep cuts to U.S. science and environmental agencies.

12.On March 16th, the Trump administration proposed a 13 percent budget cut to the Park Service funding. These budget cuts would lose 1,242 full-time equivalent (FTE) staff, leading to significant challenges at almost every park.

13.On March 28th, Trump issued an executive order charging the DOI with reviewing rules for oil and gas drilling inside the boundaries of our national park sites. Trump's executive order also made the EPA start the process of rewriting the clean power plan.

14.On March 29th, Against the advice of the EPA’s chemical safety experts, EPA administrator Scott Pruitt rejects a decade-old petition asking that the EPA ban all use of the pesticide chlorpyrifos. Research suggests that chlorpyrifos may be associated with brain damage in children and farm workers, even at low exposures.

15.On March 29th, Ryan Zinke, the interior secretary, revoked the freeze and review on new coal leases on public lands.

16.On April 3rd, Overturned a ban on hunting of predators in Alaskan wildlife refuges. Including the hunting of bear cubs in and around their dens.

17.On April 5th, the trump administration withdrew guidance from federal agencies to include greenhouse gas emissions in environmental reviews.

18.On April 7th, staff members at EPA’s headquarters who specialized in climate change adaptation have been reassigned. Rolled back limits on toxic discharge from power plants into public waterways.

19.On April 16th, Trump issued an executive order calling on the DOI to reopen its five-year plan for offshore drilling.

20.On April 19th, An Interior Department official updates the department’s climate change website, deleting much of its content in the process.

21.On April 22nd, Scientist March on Washington, voicing support for science’s role in society.

22.On April 26th, Trump instructs Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review as many as 40 national monuments created since 1996 to determine if any of Trump’s three predecessors exceeded their authority when protecting large tracts of already-public land under the Antiquities Act of 1906.

23.On April 27th, the EPA delayed a lawsuit over a rule regulating airborne mercury emissions from power plants.

24.On April 28th, EPA scrubs climate change from their website.

25.On May 5th, the EPA dismisses several members of the Board of Scientific Counselors.

26.On June 1st, the U.S. pulls out of the Paris Climate Agreement.

27.On June 8th, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke on Wednesday ordered a review of an Obama administration conservation plan to protect the greater sage-grouse to determine if that plan interferes with Trump administration efforts to increase energy production on federal lands.

28.On June 12th, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke recommended that Bears Ears National Monument in southern Utah’s red rock country be shrunk by President Trump.

29.On June 26th, the administration called for the repeal of the Clean Water Rule.

30.On July 6th, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers approved a permit that would allow Dominion Energy, to build 17 enormous transmission towers near Colonial National Historical Park, the site of the United States first English colony.

31.On July 19th, the DOI called for a reexamination of rules that protect bears and wolves in national preserves in Alaska from egregious hunting methods, including baiting bears with grease-soaked donuts and killing mother bears with their cubs.

32.On August 7th, The DOI relaxes aspects of sage grouse protection to help with the Trump administration’s efforts to increase energy production on federal lands.

33.On August 22nd, the trump administration has suspended a study of health risks to residents who live near mountaintop removal coal mine sites in the Appalachian Mountains.

34.On October 9th, Trump EPA works on scrapping the Clean Power Plan(CCP). Scott Pruitt gave a speech in Hazard, Kentucky and declared that he will sign a proposal on Tuesday that would eliminate the CCP.

35.On October 23rd, The Department of Interior proposed the largest ever gas and oil lease auction of 77 million acres of federal waters within the Gulf of Mexico.

36.On October 24th, A small Montana company located in Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's hometown has signed a $300 million contract to help get the power back on in Puerto Rico. Whitefish Energy Holdings, LLC had only two full-time employees on the day Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico.

37.On November 1st, Trump administration proposed a rule Tuesday to federalize regulation of drift gillnets used to catch swordfish on the West Coast. The rule would end California's right to prevent the deadly entanglements of sea turtles, whales, and dolphins in these underwater, mile-long nets.

38.On November 2nd, Trump administration is targeting for review a uranium mining ban that former President Barack Obama instituted in the watershed of the Grand Canyon.

39.On November 7th, French President Emmanuel Macron's Cabinet said Trump not invited to climate change summit for the time being.

40.On November 16th, The Trump administration has reversed the ban on elephant trophy imports. They have agreed to allow the remains of elephants killed in Zimbabwe and Zambia to be brought back to the U.S.

41.On November 16th, The Keystone pipeline has leaked and spilled about 210,000 gallons of oil in South Dakota. TransCanada Corp.'s Keystone pipeline has been temporarily shut down.

42.On November 24th, Tucked away in the Senate report accompanying the funding bill for the Department of the Interior is a directive to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to end the Red Wolf recovery program and declare the Red Wolf extinct.

43.On November 25th, Oil drilling in a vast Alaskan wildlife refuge moved a step closer to reality after the U.S. Senate energy and natural resources panel voted 13-10 to open part of the reserve.

44.On November 28th, The Cause of Action Institute (a group aligned with GOP mega-donors Charles and David Koch) have filed suit accusing EPA employee of using an encrypted messaging services to protect their jobs. They report that EPA employees were using an encrypted messaging app to determine how to respond to a feared purge of climate science from the new Trump administration.

45.On November 28th, the Trump administration has approved an oil company’s request to explore for oil in the Arctic Ocean.

46.On December 4th, Trump gave a speech in Salt Lake City announcing his intentions to reduce two Utah national monuments Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument. Bears Ears would be reduced by 1.35 million acres (-85%) and Grand Staircase Escalante would be reduced by 1.88 million acres (-50%).

47.On December 7th, Trump administration drops rule requiring mining companies to have money to clean up pollution, despite an industry legacy of abandoned mines that have fouled waterways across the U.S.

48.On December 8th, the Trump administration will suspend a rule to limit methane leaks from oil and gas operations on federal land.

49.On December 14th, Trump administration removed net neutrality. This now allows broadband providers to block websites like ours. The Internet has played an increasingly vital role in political expression and organizing. Groups like ours have used social media to share information, plan events, and motivate participation.

50.On December 15th, It was reported that Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke brought David Smith the superintendent of Joshua Tree National Park to his office to reprimand him for climate change-related tweets the park sent via Twitter.

51.On December 16th, Trump administration is prohibiting officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from using a list of words, including "fetus," "entitlement," "diversity," "transgender," "vulnerable," "evidence-based" and "science-based."

52.On December 18th, Trump announced the US will no longer regard climate change by name as a national security threat.

53.On December 19th, EPA has ended a contract with a group (Definers Public Affairs) that had been investigating any EPA employees who disagreed with the Trump administration agenda.

54.On December 19th, in the emergency supplemental funding bill language was hidden that would exempt Federal Emergency Management Agency(FEMA) from following requirements set by the Endangered Species Act.

55.On December 20th, Toxic chemical bans were indefinitely postponed for methylene chloride, N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and trichloroethylene (TCE).

56.On December 21st, Independent studies were halted that would improve the safety of offshore drilling platforms and another to look at health risks of mountaintop-removal coal mining in central Appalachia.

57.On December 21st, Revoked the Obama-era Resource Management Planning Rule (Planning 2.0 Rule), which advocated new technologies to improve transparency related to mining on public lands. A Federal Register filing said this rule "shall be treated as if it had never taken effect."

58.On December 22nd, The Republican “tax reform” bill was signed and included opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling.

59.On December 22nd, Ruled that "incidental" killings of 1,000 migratory bird species are not illegal under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

60.On December 22nd, Reversed a previous Obama-era Interior Department decision to withdraw permits for a proposed $2.8 billion copper mine in Minnesota.

61.On December 23rd, It was reported that hundreds of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists were barred from attending an industry conference this month.

62.On December 27th, A plan was announced to consider increasing the use of neonicotinoid insecticides known as thiamethoxam, which is proven to be deadly to bees.

63.On December 27th, Allowed oil and gas leasing and development near and even inside greater sage-grouse habitat management areas.

64.On December 28th, Announced a plan to repeal an Obama-era rule that governed fracking standards on federal and tribal lands. The rule would have required companies to disclose chemicals used in their fracking fluids, set standards for well construction, and required surface ponds holding fracking fluids to be covered.

65.On December 29th, Trump administration proposed to remove offshore-drilling safety regulations put in place after the deadly Deepwater Horizon disaster.

Women fishing in the Terai region of Nepal.

Water is the single most important natural resource underpinning Nepal’s economy and livelihoods. Inclusive, sustainable management of water resources in Nepal depends on addressing climate change and protecting healthy, biodiverse ecosystems.

 

The USAID Paani program will enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity. Focusing primarily at the watershed, basin, and national scales, USAID Paani will reduce threats to freshwater biodiversity and increase the ability of targeted human and ecological communities in the Karnali, Mahakali, and Rapti river basins to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change through improved water management.

 

LIFE OF PROJECT: April 2016 – December 2020

 

GOAL: To enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity

 

IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: DAI; World Wildlife Fund (WWF); SNV; SILT; Nepal Environmental and Scientific Support Service (NESS)

 

GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS: The Karnali, Mahakali, and Rapti river basins in Mid-Western and Far-Western Nepal

 

TOTAL PROJECT AMOUNT: $24.8 Million

 

Photo credit: Satyam Joshi/USAID

Water is the single most important natural resource underpinning Nepal’s economy and livelihoods. Inclusive, sustainable management of water resources in Nepal depends on addressing climate change and protecting healthy, biodiverse ecosystems.

 

The families in Taule are benefiting from a solar-powered water pump that lifts 10,000 - 12,000 liters of water 68 meters from the river to the village's terraced fields. The eight member Sitaram Agriculture Group received 80,000 NRP ($800) in grants from USAID's KISAN and the Chhinchu-10 Village Development Committee. They also borrowed 27,500 NRP ($275) to construct the water tank, half of which they have already repaid.

 

The USAID Paani program has visited several small irrigation schemes supported by USAID KISANI. KISANI research has found that irrigation is the number one constraint limiting farmers' livelihoods.

 

The USAID Paani program will enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity. Focusing primarily at the watershed, basin, and national scales, USAID Paani will reduce threats to freshwater biodiversity and increase the ability of targeted human and ecological communities in the Karnali, Mahakali, and Rapti river basins to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change through improved water management.

 

The program will play a pivotal role in shaping Nepal’s management of critical water resources between now and 2020. It will apply an integrated, whole-of-basin perspective to freshwater biodiversity conservation and sustainable water management in the three critical river basins in Mid-Western and Far-Western Nepal in response to changing climate conditions. Paani is part of USAID’s on-going investment in strengthening natural resource management in Nepal. It is a sister project to the USAID-funded Nepal Hydropower Development Project (NHDP) and complementary projects funded by the US Forest Service and the International Water Management Institute (IWMI). It will build upon USAID/Nepal’s experience in terrestrial conservation, extending successful community-based models for reducing threats to key species and building resilience from Nepal’s high mountain slopes to the rich waterways in some of the most pristine natural habitat on the planet.

 

Photo credit: Satyam Joshi/USAID

 

Women fishing in the Terai region of Nepal.

Nebukhali village suffered huge losses during Aila and continues to bear the brunt to this day. The soil is highly saline. Preetilata Mahila Samiti Self Help Group group has a grain-bank built with support from DRCSC’s Area Resource Training Centre (ARTC) through a loan. The grain-bank means security on a rainy day and relief from running into debts or paying huge interests.

Dairy farmer Mohamed Fakir from Punjab, India, was interviewed as part of the 'Farmer Testimonial Video Series’. His major concern is that his cows are not producing as much milk as they used to. According to Mohamed, this is largely due to the changing climate, lack of water and infrastructure. Other concerns he deals with are the reduction in fodder production around his village. Farmers instead grow cash crops, he explains, and thus it is getting increasingly difficult to get enough fodder for the animals. In the picture: A girl milking the cows. Photo: P. Casier (CGIAR).

 

View Mohamed Fakir tell his story in this video interview.

It’s been seven years the deadly tidal waves rushed in; the land is still saline and opportunities for survival, evasive.

Water is the single most important natural resource underpinning Nepal’s economy and livelihoods. Inclusive, sustainable management of water resources in Nepal depends on addressing climate change and protecting healthy, biodiverse ecosystems.

 

The USAID Paani program will enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity. Focusing primarily at the watershed, basin, and national scales, USAID Paani will reduce threats to freshwater biodiversity and increase the ability of targeted human and ecological communities in the Karnali, Mahakali, and Rapti river basins to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change through improved water management.

 

LIFE OF PROJECT: April 2016 – December 2020

 

GOAL: To enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity

 

IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: DAI; World Wildlife Fund (WWF); SNV; SILT; Nepal Environmental and Scientific Support Service (NESS)

 

GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS: The Karnali, Mahakali, and Rapti river basins in Mid-Western and Far-Western Nepal

 

TOTAL PROJECT AMOUNT: $24.8 Million

 

Photo credit: Satyam Joshi/USAID

Woman with a recent harvest of rice in the rainfed village of Gorita, Andhra Pradesh, India. Photographer Francesco Fiondella, from the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), has visited four states in India to gather footage on the kinds of tools and technologies available to farmers to help them manage climate and weather risks. The trip was funded by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and IRI. Please credit: F. Fiondella (IRI/CCAFS)

 

View Francesco's other photoset: Farmers in Mali.

Read more about our work in South Asia.

 

Gorita villagers reocrd rainfall events as well as what the forecasts said.Photographer Francesco Fiondella, from the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), has visited four states in India to gather footage on the kinds of tools and technologies available to farmers to help them manage climate and weather risks. The trip was funded by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and IRI. Please credit: F. Fiondella (IRI/CCAFS)

 

View Francesco other photoset: Farmers in Mali.

Read more about our work in South Asia.

 

Photo credit: UNDP Sri Lanka.

 

Walking through the paddy fields of Jabarakanda, deep in the Walapane area of the Nuwara Eliya District, one is met with peace and serenity. Fields of paddy and little pockets of crops such as corn greet your eyes everywhere you look. The sun shines bright and the little streams are plentiful.

 

It is here that Dhammika Jayasekara and her team grow non-chemical produce such as madu koku, hathawariya, brinjals, wattakka dalu, kuura thampala, saarana, bandakka, polos, inguru, and kurakkan piti.

 

Previously, Dhammika used agrochemicals for farming and transported the produce to be sold in Dambulla – over 100kms away from Walapane. Dhammika recalls that it was challenging to sell the produce and it would often get damaged while being transported. This meant the income they earned fluctuated from good days to occasions they would come home empty handed.

 

Recently, Dhammika - and through her, her family - was introduced to non-chemical methods of farming through the 'Climate Change Adaptation' Project which strengthens livelihoods of communities affected by climate change.

 

Read more: undpsrilanka.exposure.co/making-wholesome-sustainable

 

* Relates to the UNDP and WFP-supported Adaptation Fund-financed project 'Addressing Climate Change Impacts on Marginalized Agricultural Communities Living in the Mahaweli River Basin of Sri Lanka' www.lk.undp.org/content/srilanka/en/home/projects/Climate...

Water is the single most important natural resource underpinning Nepal’s economy and livelihoods. Inclusive, sustainable management of water resources in Nepal depends on addressing climate change and protecting healthy, biodiverse ecosystems.

 

The families in Taule are benefiting from a solar-powered water pump that lifts 10,000 - 12,000 liters of water 68 meters from the river to the village's terraced fields, including traditional rice paddies. The eight member Sitaram Agriculture Group received 80,000 NRP ($800) in grants from USAID's KISAN and the Chhinchu-10 Village Development Committee. They also borrowed 27,500 NRP ($275) to construct the water tank, half of which they have already repaid.

 

The USAID Paani program has visited several small irrigation schemes supported by USAID KISANI. KISANI research has found that irrigation is the number one constraint limiting farmers' livelihoods.

 

The USAID Paani program will enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity. Focusing primarily at the watershed, basin, and national scales, USAID Paani will reduce threats to freshwater biodiversity and increase the ability of targeted human and ecological communities in the Karnali, Mahakali, and Rapti river basins to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change through improved water management.

 

The program will play a pivotal role in shaping Nepal’s management of critical water resources between now and 2020. It will apply an integrated, whole-of-basin perspective to freshwater biodiversity conservation and sustainable water management in the three critical river basins in Mid-Western and Far-Western Nepal in response to changing climate conditions. Paani is part of USAID’s on-going investment in strengthening natural resource management in Nepal. It is a sister project to the USAID-funded Nepal Hydropower Development Project (NHDP) and complementary projects funded by the US Forest Service and the International Water Management Institute (IWMI). It will build upon USAID/Nepal’s experience in terrestrial conservation, extending successful community-based models for reducing threats to key species and building resilience from Nepal’s high mountain slopes to the rich waterways in some of the most pristine natural habitat on the planet.

 

Photo credit: Satyam Joshi/USAID

 

Earlier, the output was 16 bags of rice that meant about Rs. 10000 in a year. Now, Pradip has fish to eat plus 1 kg of fish sells everyday for Rs. 100. His family need not buy vegetables, rice, fish, turmeric and oil. One hectare yields about Rs. 15000-20000 in a year.

Helene is a female farmer from Burkina Faso grows vegetables in the dry season through using simple irrigation techniques. By selling the crops she has earned enough money to send her children to school. Photo: P. Casier (CGIAR). Please credit appropriately.

 

Read more about Helene’s struggle against drought on CCAFS blog “Ninigui: A war against… erosion and desertification. - Part IV: Helene’s vegetable farm” .

 

You can also learn more about CCAFS work in West Africa by clicking here

 

Water is the single most important natural resource underpinning Nepal’s economy and livelihoods. Inclusive, sustainable management of water resources in Nepal depends on addressing climate change and protecting healthy, biodiverse ecosystems.

 

The USAID Paani program will enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity. Focusing primarily at the watershed, basin, and national scales, USAID Paani will reduce threats to freshwater biodiversity and increase the ability of targeted human and ecological communities in the Karnali, Mahakali, and Rapti river basins to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change through improved water management.

 

The program will play a pivotal role in shaping Nepal’s management of critical water resources between now and 2020. It will apply an integrated, whole-of-basin perspective to freshwater biodiversity conservation and sustainable water management in the three critical river basins in Mid-Western and Far-Western Nepal in response to changing climate conditions. Paani is part of USAID’s on-going investment in strengthening natural resource management in Nepal. It is a sister project to the USAID-funded Nepal Hydropower Development Project (NHDP) and complementary projects funded by the US Forest Service and the International Water Management Institute (IWMI). It will build upon USAID/Nepal’s experience in terrestrial conservation, extending successful community-based models for reducing threats to key species and building resilience from Nepal’s high mountain slopes to the rich waterways in some of the most pristine natural habitat on the planet.

 

The families in Taule are benefiting from a solar-powered water pump that lifts 10,000 - 12,000 liters of water 68 meters from the river to the village's terraced fields. The eight member Sitaram Agriculture Group received 80,000 NRP ($800) in grants from USAID's KISAN and the Chhinchu-10 Village Development Committee. They also borrowed 27,500 NRP ($275) to construct the water tank, half of which they have already repaid.

 

The USAID Paani program has visited several small irrigation schemes supported by USAID KISANI. KISANI research has found that irrigation is the number one constraint limiting farmers' livelihoods.

 

Photo credit: Satyam Joshi/USAID

 

Climate Change Adaptation Strategies for Capacity-Building and Economic Empowerment of Women Farmers: Climate change adaptation strategies to build the capacity of and economically empower women farmers. Speakers: Ministers of environment / gender / agriculture, UN-Women, beneficiaries, etc. External partners: Mali, Malawi + other countries to be added, CSOs.

 

Photo: UN Women/Ryan Brown

 

Pictures are from meeting with innovative farmer Joel Yiri, Jirapa Village in Ghana. He started developing his plot of land by using manure from his pigs when he realized the soil had become infertile. He is also serious about keeping a record of all input costs and revenues, meaning that he now can track looses and change crops and production techniques accordingly. Joel Yiri is also experiencing a change in rainfall patters, the rain start later every year, and stops earlier, mixed with periods of drought. View Joel Yiri talk about his farming techniques and his hopes for the future in the video ‘Farmer Testimonials’. Read also the accompanying blog story on the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) blog "We should not farm anymore like our grandfathers did". Photo: P. Casier (CGIAR).

Farmer from the village of Ludhiana in Punjab India. He is trying to create small pathways for the water to run through. CCAFS is performing research in several parts of South Asia. To read more about our research on climate change, agriculture and food security in this area, visit our regional South Asia page.

 

The pictures in this set were taken in relation to the making of the farmer testimonial videos, on farmer adaptation and mitigation to climate change. Click here to view CCAFS Youtube channel and the Farmer Testimonial Videos. Photo: P. Casier (CGIAR). Please credit appropriately.

   

Photographer Francesco Fiondella, from the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), has visited four states in India to gather footage on the kinds of tools and technologies available to farmers to help them manage climate and weather risks. The trip was funded by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and IRI. Please credit: F. Fiondella (IRI/CCAFS)

 

View Francesco's other photoset: Farmers in Mali.

Read more about our work in South Asia.

 

Lambada Tribal Women. Photographer Francesco Fiondella, from the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), has visited four states in India to gather footage on the kinds of tools and technologies available to farmers to help them manage climate and weather risks. The trip was funded by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and IRI. Please credit: F. Fiondella (IRI/CCAFS)

 

View Francesco's other photoset: Farmers in Mali.

Read more about our work in South Asia.

 

A maize farmer with a handful of dry soil. A new study by CIAT and partners - Tortillas on the Roaster (TOR) - examines the expected effects of climate change on two key food crops in Central America - maize and beans.

 

Credit: ©2012CIAT/NeilPalmer

Please credit accordingly and leave a comment when you use a CIAT photo.

For more info: ciat-comunicaciones@cgiar.org

Farmer from Kenya working in the field with his cattle. Adapting to the changing climate in Kenya is crucial in order to sustain farming and the livelihoods that come with it. Andrew Gitari from Kabaune village in Kenya talks in the video series "Farmer Testimonials" about how the reduction of trees also lead to water losses. See Andrew talk about the importantce of planting trees. The village is now trying to re-plant the trees in order to increase rain and water. Photo: P. Casier (CGIAR). Please credit appropriately. Photo: P. Casier (CGIAR). Please credit appropriately.

“This time he came after 2 years. Earlier too, our husbands would go for some part for the year. After Aila, nothing grows properly, there is no work and so they remain away for years together in factories, construction sites or do petty jobs in cities like Kolkata or Chennai”, remarks Kalyani Barkandaj of Nebukhali village in Hingalganj block, North 24 Parganas.

 

Cyclone Aila that came in 2009 caused extensive damage in large parts of India and Bangladesh, killing scores of people while thousands remained missing. About a million people were reported homeless. The effects of the storm surge are quite visible in the river delta area of Sunderbans in West Bengal.

It’s been seven years the deadly tidal waves of Aila rushed in; the land is still saline and opportunities for survival, evasive.

 

Photo: Usha Dewani Das

This image is excerpted from a U.S. GAO report:

www.gao.gov/products/GAO-16-454

 

CLIMATE CHANGE: Selected Governments Have Approached Adaptation through Laws and Long-Term Plans

Water is the single most important natural resource underpinning Nepal’s economy and livelihoods. Inclusive, sustainable management of water resources in Nepal depends on addressing climate change and protecting healthy, biodiverse ecosystems.

 

The USAID Paani program will enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity. Focusing primarily at the watershed, basin, and national scales, USAID Paani will reduce threats to freshwater biodiversity and increase the ability of targeted human and ecological communities in the Karnali, Mahakali, and Rapti river basins to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change through improved water management.

 

LIFE OF PROJECT: April 2016 – December 2020

 

GOAL: To enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity

 

IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: DAI; World Wildlife Fund (WWF); SNV; SILT; Nepal Environmental and Scientific Support Service (NESS)

 

GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS: The Karnali, Mahakali, and Rapti river basins in Mid-Western and Far-Western Nepal

 

TOTAL PROJECT AMOUNT: $24.8 Million

 

Photo credit: Satyam Joshi/USAID

The area is marked by a high population density and limited areas for production, a landscape with steep slopes, various water sources and native forest fragments. There are also a variety of land uses, inlcuding: intensive smallholder vegetable production; smallholder maize, beans and cassava production. As a consequence of increased population pressure on land, extensive farming through clearance of bushes and forests has been common. However, farmers and partners in the site indicated that the government has put up legislative measures to curb deforestation. An important finding of the workshop was that men are mostly associated with cash crops while women are associated with crops for home consumption. The research team also found that cassava is an important crop for food security but poor in technical development (it takes up to 3 years). Photo: A.Eitzinger (CIAT)

Climate Change Adaptation Strategies for Capacity-Building and Economic Empowerment of Women Farmers: Climate change adaptation strategies to build the capacity of and economically empower women farmers. Speakers: Ministers of environment / gender / agriculture, UN-Women, beneficiaries, etc. External partners: Mali, Malawi + other countries to be added, CSOs.

 

Photo: UN Women/Ryan Brown

 

On Thursday, participants met in a plenary on disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation, followed by general plenary statements in morning and afternoon sessions. An informal plenary on the implementation of the outcomes of the Mid-term Review of the Hyogo Framework of Action (HPA) continued for a second day as well as a number of roundtables on managing watersheds, children for resilience, DRR and gender, DRR safety nets and mountains of risk. Winners of the UN Sasakawa Award for Disaster Risk Reduction were announced in an evening ceremony.

 

www.preventionweb.net/globalplatform/2011/announcements/v...

Climate change is an increasingly significant phenomenon and it’s likely to become something irreversible. The visualization shows the funds allocated for climate change adaptation since 2002, in the framework of international programs. The data are linked to vulnerability and readiness to climate change of the receiving Countries.

 

Team: Valeria Aufiero, Andrea Benedetti, Alessia Bissolotti, Simone Costagliola, Beatrice Gobbo

1. ADA/UNDP Project overview "Supporting Moldova's NAtional Climate Change Adaptation Planning Process".

2. Information about Climate Change Adaptation options in the water sector.

3. Description of activities within project "Construction of stormwater storage basin" and presentation of futures activities"

1. ADA/UNDP Project overview "Supporting Moldova's NAtional Climate Change Adaptation Planning Process".

2. Information about Climate Change Adaptation options in the water sector.

3. Description of activities within project "Construction of stormwater storage basin" and presentation of futures activities"

Regional Training Workshop for Journalists: Strengthening reporting on adaptation to climate change for relevant policy approaches

 

Field Visit: Climate Smart Villages

 

Photo: Utsav Maden/ICIMOD

Photo credit must be given: ©UNDP/JIN NI. Editorial use only. Copyright ©UNDP.

A maize farmer near Alauca, Honduras, digs irrigation channels in advance of maize planting. A new study by CIAT and partners - Tortillas on the Roaster (TOR) - examines the expected effects of climate change on two key food crops in Central America - maize and beans.

 

Credit: ©2012CIAT/NeilPalmer

Please credit accordingly and leave a comment when you use a CIAT photo.

For more info: ciat-comunicaciones@cgiar.org

Women fishing in the Terai region of Nepal.

 

The USAID Paani program will enhance Nepal’s ability to manage water resources for multiple uses and users through climate change adaptation and the conservation of freshwater biodiversity.

 

Photo by Olaf Zerbock, USAID.

Villagers growing rain-fed rice in wetland area of Beung Kiat Ngong.

 

Photo credit must be given: ©FAO/Xavier Bouan. Editorial use only.

FAO project: GCP/LAO/022/LDF Climate change adaptation in wetland areas in Lao PDR (CAWA)

Photo credit must be given: ©UNDP/JIN NI. Editorial use only. Copyright ©UNDP.

Maize tortillas cooking in El Salvador. A new study by CIAT and partners - Tortillas on the Roaster (TOR) - examines the expected effects of climate change on two key food crops in Central America - maize and beans.

 

Credit: ©2012CIAT/NeilPalmer

Please credit accordingly and leave a comment when you use a CIAT photo.

For more info: ciat-comunicaciones@cgiar.org

Photo credit must be given: ©UNDP/JIN NI. Editorial use only. Copyright ©UNDP.

Photo credit must be given: ©UNDP/JIN NI. Editorial use only. Copyright ©UNDP.

Studies have shown that climate change will cause a shift of climatic zones in the ecosystems of Altai-Sayan, resulting in the migration of animals and plants. In response, a buffer zone of about 600,000 hectares of protected forests has been created between the Western and Eastern part of the region to protect the migration routes of globally threatened species, such as the snow leopard, lynx, European red deer, elk, argali, and more.

 

FInd out more about Adapting to climate change in Altai-Sayan

 

Photo courtesy of UNDP in Kazakhstan

A giant message in a bottle from millions of the world's poorest people washes up on a Cancun beach. Oxfam is calling for a climate fund to be established in Cancun to help poor communities adapt to a changing climate and to help pave the way to a fair ambitious and binding global deal to tackle climate change.

 

Find out more about Oxfam's work at UN climate summit 2010 in Cancun, Mexico

 

Credit: Ainhoa Goma/Oxfam

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