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14th June 2015 - Hawker Hurricane MkI 'R4118' taxi's in to the RAF Cosford airshow.

  

Hawker Hurricane Mark I, R4118, was delivered new to 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron at Drem on 17 August 1940. During the Battle of Britain it flew 49 sorties from Croydon and shot down five enemy aircraft. After being battle damaged on 22 October 1940, the aircraft was rebuilt and taken on charge by 111 Squadron at Dyce on 18 January 1941. There it was flown on patrol over the North Sea and was again in combat. Over the following two years it was used primarily as a training aircraft with 59 and 56 OTUs, and was rebuilt a further three times following major accidents, including hitting a lorry on the runway and being stuffed into a snowbank!

 

In December 1943, R4118 was crated at Cardiff and shipped to India as a training aircraft. However it was never needed and remained in its packing case in Bombay until 1947 when it was struck off charge. It was donated to a university for engineering instruction. The fuselage was stood outside in a compound with the propeller, wings and tailplane laid on the ground. There it remained until June 2001 when Peter Vacher was able to conclude six-year-long negotiations and R4118 was loaded into a container. The aircraft has been restored to flying condition over the past three years.

 

During its lifetime, it was fitted with no fewer than five Rolls-Royce Merlin III engines, and underwent four major rebuilds. It is still powered by a Merlin III (the only other aircraft in the world to retain a Merlin III is the Sea Hurricane at Shuttleworth). It is said to be the most historic fighter aircraft to have survived the war.

 

Meticulous restoration was undertaken by Hawker Restorations Ltd in Suffolk. This included fitting every piece of equipment which was in the aircraft during the Battle, such as the first of the VHF radios (the TR1133), the Identification Friend or Foe unit, the original 8 Browning machine guns, and the camera gun in the starboard wing.

 

Wing Commander Bob Foster, who shot down three enemy aircraft from R4118 during the Battle, is the current Chairman of the Battle of Britain Fighter Association.

The court house Santa Barbara, California

 

Some special news to share...Tim and I just adopted a little baby girl 9 weeks old and we named her Sicily...Sici (Sissy) for short! She is half Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and half mini poodle. I will be slowing down just a bit as she follows me everywhere and I'm on potty training duty and crate night training! I had three hours sleep last night...may have to break from my evening flower postings and I have so many more! Lol

The stunning sight of a Hawker Hurricane, on the grass runway at Charlton Park Estate. The property is owned by Michael Howard, 21st Earl of Suffolk and is a Grade I listed building.

 

The return of a RAF fighter aircraft from the 1940s was particularly poignant as Charlton Park House was used for the filming of a 1988 British television series, "Piece of Cake", depicting the fictional life of a Royal Air Force fighter squadron during World War II. The house was used to represent the Officers' Mess and Spitfires were operated from the grass runway for the production.

 

This particular aircraft has a very interesting history, as a true combat veteran: R4118 was delivered new to 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron in August 1940 and went on to fly 49 sorties during the Battle of Britain and shot down five enemy aircraft. After being battle damaged, repaired and used by numerous other units between October 1940 and December 1943, R4118 was packed into a shipping crate and sent to India as a training aircraft, however it was never required and remained crated until being donated to an Indian engineering university in 1947. It remained there until 1996 when Peter Vacher shipped what remained of the aircraft back to the UK for restoration, and it returned to the air in December 2004. For many years the Hurricane was operated on the display circuit by Peter Vacher, until 2015 when she was purchased by James Brown. He, under the banner of 'Hurricane Heritage' has kept the aircraft flying ever since.

So my WNGD photo was a bit revealing but this is the real reason I've been so woeful with keeping up with commenting on my Flickr groups & my friends' photos the past few days.

 

Meet Penny the newest addition to our family. She's an English Pointer pup, 9 weeks old today. I'd totally forgotten what hard work puppies are! House-training is going well, thank goodness the weather has been so dry. She sleeps in a little crate during the day & overnight. Bella is a bit nonplussed with all the chewing & general playfulness but they're getting on fine. I shall be very surprised if my slippers survive the next few weeks.

Meant to post this on Wednesday, but was away on holiday so couldn't do it. Anyway, here it it is.

 

On 22nd July 1298 he Battle of Falkirk took place between the forces of Scotland under William Wallace and an English army under Edward I. A pivotal moment in the First War of Scottish Independence, it would be a significant defeat for the Scots leading to Wallace resigning as Guardian of Scotland.

 

In September 1297 the Scots had inflicted a crushing defeat upon the English at the Battle of Striling Bridge. Since then Wallace and his army had been able to travel south with little opposition and raid the countryside along the Scottish / English border. Hearing of the defeat at Stirling, Edward hastily agreed a truce with the French king, Philip the Fair and returned to England to prepare a counterstrike. He assembled a force of around 15,000 men, including some 10,500 Welshmen. Edward ordered his army to assemble at Roxburgh in the Scottish Borders on June 25th where he remained until July 3rd.

 

He reached Kirkliston in two weeks, where he awaited supplies expected to arrive along the coastal ports, delayed due to weather. There he was forced to deal with a mutiny among his Welsh troops but on July 20th was able to move on, reaching Linlithgow on the 21st. Hearing that a Scottish army was at Torwood, near Falkirk, he decided to place his army south of the town.

 

​The Wallace’s army numbered around 6,000, perhaps consisting of four schiltrons with about 1,000 men each, in addition to the cavalry and archers. Absent however, were forces under the Comyns and Robert Bruce. Also absent was Andrew Moray, co-victor with Wallace at the Battle of Stirling Bridge, having been mortally wounded in that battle. It was Moray who used the schiltrons offensively.

 

The schiltrons formed the backbone of the Scottish army, consisting chiefly of spearmen arranged in a circular formation, with the long spears pointing outwards. At Falkirk it is thought four were arranged with archers filling the gaps between them and some 500 knights supporting them to their rear. When in formation however schiltrons were essentially static and at Falkirk they were fortified by stakes driven into the ground before them, with ropes between. In front of them was an area of marshy ground which would make an English charge difficult.

 

It was therefore up to the English to advance and since they were eager to do battle, advance they did. Their cavalry was divided into four battalions with the Earl of Lincoln leading from the right but moving left to avoid the marshy ground; they were followed by the Earl of Surrey's horse. Anthony Bek and Edward’s horse moved around the right of the marshy ground. Lincoln and Bek charged aggressively and Lincoln quickly routed the Scottish cavalry.

 

The Scots bowmen commanded by Sir John Stewart of Bonkill, the younger brother of the High Steward of Scotland, stood their ground and were quickly destroyed. But the schiltrons held firm, with the knights making little impression on the dense forest of long spears, and 111 horses were killed in the vain attempts. Edward's cavalry fell back as his infantry and archers arrived.

 

​Edward's longbowmen were brought into place and quickly overcame the inexperienced force of badly armed Scottish archers. The schiltrons were an easy target; they had no defence and nowhere to hide. The hail of arrows was supplemented by crossbow and slingshot. Unable to retreat or attack the schiltrons were cut to pieces, the battle lost almost as soon as the first arrows began to fall. The English cavalry waited, this time observing the King's command, until the Scots ranks were thin enough to allow them to penetrate the Scottish formation and cause whatever damage they could. The English footsoldiers, who had been advancing during the English barrage on the Scottish formations, closed the distance and the schiltrons finally started to break and scatter. Wallace managed to escape and the surviving Scots fled into the woods.

 

Casualties among the Scottish leaders were not particularly heavy, but did include Wallace's second-in-command, Sir John de Graham, as well as Sir John Stewart of Bonkill, and Macduff of Fife. According to the historian Stuart Reid, "while unquestionably a good partisan leader, William Wallace's military abilities were simply not up to the job of organizing, training and leading a conventional military force." At Falkirk, Wallace "simply drew up his army in an open field and froze."

 

Edward occupied Stirling and raided Perth, St. Andrews and Ayrshire. Yet, he retreated to Carlisle by September 9th. By this time Wallace had resigned as Guardian of Scotland in favour of Robert the Bruce, Earl of Carrick and future king, and John Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, King John Balliol's nephew. Edward invaded again in the summer of 1300 and so began a new chapter of the First War of Scottish Independence.

 

This model was created for a Brick to the Past Blog: www.bricktothepast.com/blog-to-the-past/battle-of-falkirk

 

This model was made for Brick to the Past. Brick to the Past specialise in crating massive, detailed and meticulously researched historically themed LEGO® models. You can follow us on:

 

www.facebook.com/bricktothepast

twitter.com/bricktothepast

www.bricktothepast.com

 

LEGO The A-Team: The second addition to my A-Team stuff - just the characters for now.

 

Description from Wikipedia:

 

The A-Team is a group of ex-United States Army Special Forces who, near the end of the Vietnam War, were convicted of a crime they did not commit and managed to escape from the military police. As fugitives, the A-Team work as soldiers of fortune, using their military training to fight oppression or injustice. Hannibal, along with B. A. Baracus, Templeton "Faceman" Peck, and H. M. Murdock make up the A-Team.

 

In the pilot episode ("Mexican Slayride: Part 1"), Hannibal is described as follows by a reporter colleague of Amy Allen: "The leader (of the A-Team) is a Colonel named John Smith. But everybody calls him Hannibal. The guy has a very unorthodox style." Smith takes his name from the famous military commander, and strategist, as alluded to by B.A. Baracus in the same episode. He is distinguished by his unflappable demeanor, even when in peril, his constant cigar-smoking, his black leather gloves, and his many comic disguises. He is a master tactician (although his plans rarely turn out as they are supposed to; when asked if she thought this was going to work, Amy Allen summed it up by saying, "Hannibal's plans never work right. They just work.") and seems to have a plan for getting the team out of any situation they get into. His favorite catch phrase is,

"I love it when a plan comes together."

In an alternate dimension.

 

All 8 Dejarik monsters seen in Episodes 4 and 7 are represented here, from left to right: Grimtaash the Molator, the K'lor'slug, the Ghhhk, the Kintan Strider, the Mantellian Savrip, the Houjix, the Monnok, and the Ng'ok.

 

I began designing this halfway through September for The Brothers Brick's Falcon contest, and have been building it relentlessly for the last five days. My original contest idea was to do the original Colin Cantwell Falcon concept (which Ralph McQuarrie would include in some of his early conceptual paintings), but decided against it because it is essentially the Tantive IV with a different bridge section. I came up with this idea shortly after and liked it better.

 

I used Ep 4, 5, and 7 as reference for the interior (the Ep 7 interior has some differences, like the floor grid being a totally different pattern, and the wall "sconces" having circular edges rather than square ones). I also used stills and fan-made CGI recreations. Even though the cast of characters is turned upside down, the environment around them is unchanged from Episode 4. The floor patterns, some of the wall details, even down to the crates next to the booth are left as-is from how they are in the first film.

 

As for the creatures, choosing colors was hard. The holographic look of the game pieces messes with what the creature's real colors should be. Reference material is pretty limited, and can be inconsistent for both color and shape. Phil Tippett's interview with Tested about the redone Ep. 7 monsters was an invaluable resource to see up-close views of these creatures directly from the man who made them both times.

When I got Flynn, he was a nightmare in the house - the stereotypical crazy, hyperactive border collie. He had far more serious behavioural problems but honestly, what nearly broke me early on was his total inability to settle at home. Unless I left the house, Flynn simply never stopped - it didn't matter how much physical/mental exercise he'd had, Flynn would be literally pinging off the walls, barking his head off the moment I sat down for a cup of tea. My physical health isn't fantastic & it reached a point where I realised this situation couldn't continue. Even Flynn didn't seem particularly happy - I'm sure he was actually tired too but like a small child who has eaten far too much cake at a birthday party, he just didn't know how or when to *stop*!

 

Finally I worked out a routine, one which meant that we were doing less & then set about teaching Flynn an "off switch"! Every time I caught him lying down even for a moment, I'd toss food over. If he took himself to the crate, he got treats. Mad behaviour was resolutely ignored, while any & all signs of calmness were rewarded with tasty snacks. All exciting activity - playtime, more active training sessions, etc were restricted to outside. It took painful weeks/months... but finally, something clicked & Flynn began to relax indoors. Turns out, Flynn *really* likes sleeping. He sleeps from after breakfast to late-afternoon, & once he's been exercised & fed, takes himself right back to bed again & sleeps some more, quiet as a mouse, unless he thinks I might be up for another outing. Flynn's turned into quite a relaxing companion & we're both much less stressed with life!

 

Outdoors, relaxing still doesn't come naturally to Flynn! He is NOT the sort of dog you'd take to sit outside a nice country pub, or cafe (not if you wanted a restful sit down & a drink anyway!)... Once we're outdoors, Flynn prefers to be running & playing & sniffing & exploring. He's busy busy busy!! Even when I'm taking a break, Flynn will mostly be on the go, playing fetch & "herding" games. Sometimes though, for whole seconds at a time, he flops down beside me & we enjoy the peace & quiet together :)

Meant to post this on Wednesday, but was away on holiday so couldn't do it. Anyway, here it it is.

 

On 22nd July 1298 he Battle of Falkirk took place between the forces of Scotland under William Wallace and an English army under Edward I. A pivotal moment in the First War of Scottish Independence, it would be a significant defeat for the Scots leading to Wallace resigning as Guardian of Scotland.

 

In September 1297 the Scots had inflicted a crushing defeat upon the English at the Battle of Striling Bridge. Since then Wallace and his army had been able to travel south with little opposition and raid the countryside along the Scottish / English border. Hearing of the defeat at Stirling, Edward hastily agreed a truce with the French king, Philip the Fair and returned to England to prepare a counterstrike. He assembled a force of around 15,000 men, including some 10,500 Welshmen. Edward ordered his army to assemble at Roxburgh in the Scottish Borders on June 25th where he remained until July 3rd.

 

He reached Kirkliston in two weeks, where he awaited supplies expected to arrive along the coastal ports, delayed due to weather. There he was forced to deal with a mutiny among his Welsh troops but on July 20th was able to move on, reaching Linlithgow on the 21st. Hearing that a Scottish army was at Torwood, near Falkirk, he decided to place his army south of the town.

 

​The Wallace’s army numbered around 6,000, perhaps consisting of four schiltrons with about 1,000 men each, in addition to the cavalry and archers. Absent however, were forces under the Comyns and Robert Bruce. Also absent was Andrew Moray, co-victor with Wallace at the Battle of Stirling Bridge, having been mortally wounded in that battle. It was Moray who used the schiltrons offensively.

 

The schiltrons formed the backbone of the Scottish army, consisting chiefly of spearmen arranged in a circular formation, with the long spears pointing outwards. At Falkirk it is thought four were arranged with archers filling the gaps between them and some 500 knights supporting them to their rear. When in formation however schiltrons were essentially static and at Falkirk they were fortified by stakes driven into the ground before them, with ropes between. In front of them was an area of marshy ground which would make an English charge difficult.

 

It was therefore up to the English to advance and since they were eager to do battle, advance they did. Their cavalry was divided into four battalions with the Earl of Lincoln leading from the right but moving left to avoid the marshy ground; they were followed by the Earl of Surrey's horse. Anthony Bek and Edward’s horse moved around the right of the marshy ground. Lincoln and Bek charged aggressively and Lincoln quickly routed the Scottish cavalry.

 

The Scots bowmen commanded by Sir John Stewart of Bonkill, the younger brother of the High Steward of Scotland, stood their ground and were quickly destroyed. But the schiltrons held firm, with the knights making little impression on the dense forest of long spears, and 111 horses were killed in the vain attempts. Edward's cavalry fell back as his infantry and archers arrived.

 

​Edward's longbowmen were brought into place and quickly overcame the inexperienced force of badly armed Scottish archers. The schiltrons were an easy target; they had no defence and nowhere to hide. The hail of arrows was supplemented by crossbow and slingshot. Unable to retreat or attack the schiltrons were cut to pieces, the battle lost almost as soon as the first arrows began to fall. The English cavalry waited, this time observing the King's command, until the Scots ranks were thin enough to allow them to penetrate the Scottish formation and cause whatever damage they could. The English footsoldiers, who had been advancing during the English barrage on the Scottish formations, closed the distance and the schiltrons finally started to break and scatter. Wallace managed to escape and the surviving Scots fled into the woods.

 

Casualties among the Scottish leaders were not particularly heavy, but did include Wallace's second-in-command, Sir John de Graham, as well as Sir John Stewart of Bonkill, and Macduff of Fife. According to the historian Stuart Reid, "while unquestionably a good partisan leader, William Wallace's military abilities were simply not up to the job of organizing, training and leading a conventional military force." At Falkirk, Wallace "simply drew up his army in an open field and froze."

 

Edward occupied Stirling and raided Perth, St. Andrews and Ayrshire. Yet, he retreated to Carlisle by September 9th. By this time Wallace had resigned as Guardian of Scotland in favour of Robert the Bruce, Earl of Carrick and future king, and John Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, King John Balliol's nephew. Edward invaded again in the summer of 1300 and so began a new chapter of the First War of Scottish Independence.

 

This model was created for a Brick to the Past Blog: www.bricktothepast.com/blog-to-the-past/battle-of-falkirk

 

This model was made for Brick to the Past. Brick to the Past specialise in crating massive, detailed and meticulously researched historically themed LEGO® models. You can follow us on:

 

www.facebook.com/bricktothepast

twitter.com/bricktothepast

www.bricktothepast.com

 

Meant to post this on Wednesday, but was away on holiday so couldn't do it. Anyway, here it it is.

 

On 22nd July 1298 he Battle of Falkirk took place between the forces of Scotland under William Wallace and an English army under Edward I. A pivotal moment in the First War of Scottish Independence, it would be a significant defeat for the Scots leading to Wallace resigning as Guardian of Scotland.

 

In September 1297 the Scots had inflicted a crushing defeat upon the English at the Battle of Striling Bridge. Since then Wallace and his army had been able to travel south with little opposition and raid the countryside along the Scottish / English border. Hearing of the defeat at Stirling, Edward hastily agreed a truce with the French king, Philip the Fair and returned to England to prepare a counterstrike. He assembled a force of around 15,000 men, including some 10,500 Welshmen. Edward ordered his army to assemble at Roxburgh in the Scottish Borders on June 25th where he remained until July 3rd.

 

He reached Kirkliston in two weeks, where he awaited supplies expected to arrive along the coastal ports, delayed due to weather. There he was forced to deal with a mutiny among his Welsh troops but on July 20th was able to move on, reaching Linlithgow on the 21st. Hearing that a Scottish army was at Torwood, near Falkirk, he decided to place his army south of the town.

 

​The Wallace’s army numbered around 6,000, perhaps consisting of four schiltrons with about 1,000 men each, in addition to the cavalry and archers. Absent however, were forces under the Comyns and Robert Bruce. Also absent was Andrew Moray, co-victor with Wallace at the Battle of Stirling Bridge, having been mortally wounded in that battle. It was Moray who used the schiltrons offensively.

 

The schiltrons formed the backbone of the Scottish army, consisting chiefly of spearmen arranged in a circular formation, with the long spears pointing outwards. At Falkirk it is thought four were arranged with archers filling the gaps between them and some 500 knights supporting them to their rear. When in formation however schiltrons were essentially static and at Falkirk they were fortified by stakes driven into the ground before them, with ropes between. In front of them was an area of marshy ground which would make an English charge difficult.

 

It was therefore up to the English to advance and since they were eager to do battle, advance they did. Their cavalry was divided into four battalions with the Earl of Lincoln leading from the right but moving left to avoid the marshy ground; they were followed by the Earl of Surrey's horse. Anthony Bek and Edward’s horse moved around the right of the marshy ground. Lincoln and Bek charged aggressively and Lincoln quickly routed the Scottish cavalry.

 

The Scots bowmen commanded by Sir John Stewart of Bonkill, the younger brother of the High Steward of Scotland, stood their ground and were quickly destroyed. But the schiltrons held firm, with the knights making little impression on the dense forest of long spears, and 111 horses were killed in the vain attempts. Edward's cavalry fell back as his infantry and archers arrived.

 

​Edward's longbowmen were brought into place and quickly overcame the inexperienced force of badly armed Scottish archers. The schiltrons were an easy target; they had no defence and nowhere to hide. The hail of arrows was supplemented by crossbow and slingshot. Unable to retreat or attack the schiltrons were cut to pieces, the battle lost almost as soon as the first arrows began to fall. The English cavalry waited, this time observing the King's command, until the Scots ranks were thin enough to allow them to penetrate the Scottish formation and cause whatever damage they could. The English footsoldiers, who had been advancing during the English barrage on the Scottish formations, closed the distance and the schiltrons finally started to break and scatter. Wallace managed to escape and the surviving Scots fled into the woods.

 

Casualties among the Scottish leaders were not particularly heavy, but did include Wallace's second-in-command, Sir John de Graham, as well as Sir John Stewart of Bonkill, and Macduff of Fife. According to the historian Stuart Reid, "while unquestionably a good partisan leader, William Wallace's military abilities were simply not up to the job of organizing, training and leading a conventional military force." At Falkirk, Wallace "simply drew up his army in an open field and froze."

 

Edward occupied Stirling and raided Perth, St. Andrews and Ayrshire. Yet, he retreated to Carlisle by September 9th. By this time Wallace had resigned as Guardian of Scotland in favour of Robert the Bruce, Earl of Carrick and future king, and John Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, King John Balliol's nephew. Edward invaded again in the summer of 1300 and so began a new chapter of the First War of Scottish Independence.

 

This model was created for a Brick to the Past Blog: www.bricktothepast.com/blog-to-the-past/battle-of-falkirk

 

This model was made for Brick to the Past. Brick to the Past specialise in crating massive, detailed and meticulously researched historically themed LEGO® models. You can follow us on:

 

www.facebook.com/bricktothepast

twitter.com/bricktothepast

www.bricktothepast.com

 

Number: CT 1195-19

Rank: Sergeant

Alias: Sarge

253rd Elite Legion - 2nd Regiment

 

...::Log Entry: Day 1::..

 

On the first hour on Geonosis it was hot and chaotic, nothing at all like the simulations on Kamino. Even with all the years of training, nothing could have prepared us for all the screaming and the bloodshed. It was a terrifying sight but our target was very much alive. Pong Kar stood ever comfortably in his heavily guarded spire believing he was safe; the fool couldn't have been more wrong. But before we could get our hands on the Geonosian warlord, our attention was diverted to a more ideal rude awakening; destroying his precious AA guns.

 

..::End Log::..

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here is my first entry for the 253rd Elite Legion, 2nd Regiment. I must say, building within a 16x16 base restriction was quite the challenge for me, but it was still nonetheless very fun.

 

I hope you guys like the moc and as always, feedback is much appreciated :)

 

Credit to |T|itus for the crate design.

ASOLO, A WONDERFUL CITY IN THE NORTH OF ITALY, WITH A VERY RICH HISTORY:

 

The town was originally a settlement of the Veneti, and was mentioned as Acelum in the works of Pliny.

 

In the early Middle Ages it was under the jurisdiction of the Bishops of Treviso and a possession of the Ezzelino family.

 

Later Asolo was the capital, and seat of the court, of the fiefdom of Asolo, which was granted by the Republic of Venice (to which it belonged) to Caterina Cornaro, the former Queen of Cyprus; in 1489 it was granted to her for life, but in 1509 when the League of Cambrai conquered and ransacked Asolo, Caterina fled to exile and died in Venice a year later. Under her reign, the painter Gentile Bellini and the humanist Cardinal Pietro Bembo were part of the court.

 

In 1798 the Italian impresario Antonio Locatelli built the Asolo Theatre in the former audience hall of the castle of Caterina Cornaro. The theatre was later purchased by the State of Florida for the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. The theatre was crated up and shipped to Sarasota, Florida and set up in one of the museum's galleries in 1952. It was then decided that the theatre should be reassembled into a usable theatre on the museum's grounds in the late 1950s. The newly constructed theatre opened in 1958 and is now the home of both the Asolo Repertory Theatre and the Florida State University/Asolo Conservatory for Actor Training.

 

The town was also home to the English poet Robert Browning, the actress Eleonora Duse, the explorer Freya Stark, the violinist Wilma Neruda and the composer Gian Francesco Malipiero.

 

CANON 5D MARK II

CANON 17-40MM @ 36

APERTURE F/10

SHUTTER SPEED 1/40

ISO 200 ( AS HANDHELD)

  

Babaky

 

Explore 55

 

Loading Archive

 

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Archive Activated [Please select archive file]

 

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Loading Archive File 21BBY98838296272919C/ARC-53/673/7.1

 

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Our intel had been conflicted.

We had been informed we'd be deployed on home turf, on Triple Zero, but that proved to be a typical intel balls-up.

Instead, our mission was to infiltrate a Black Sun freighter and kill every other merc onboard, and then keep our ears to the ground at our destination: a Black Sun deep space station.

We'd picked codenames for the op.

I picked Farr - it was simple -, while Tavo went for Bulke.

Rookie went Mando: A'den.

For those of you who aren't fluent, that's wrath.

Cheerful

Anyway, we boarded the Black Sun freighter, some ancient rustbucket with the words Eravana stencilled in chipped paint on the side, with little trouble.

Like many ships of its kind, the Eravana would have passed through many different hands, over the years, each owner impregnating a part of its personality onto the ship.

Flickering bulbs line the walls, failing to illuminate the stagnant, spice-ridden hallways, while unsecured crates creak as the ship turns.

Our job, dirty though it was, was to flush out all resistance.

We did our job.

The other mercs, a mixed bag of humans, Nikto and even a few Kyuzo, fought hard, but nothing compared to our special forces training.

Rookie- A'den -'s bowcaster scope settled upon a burly merc with Desilijic Kajidic Hutt Cartel tattoos covering his arms, while I took out the last Kyuzo.

After it was finished, I felt strangely hollow. I'd killed droids and humanoids before, in honest combat, but somehow, the death of fellow humans in such a cold-blooded way seemed different.

Worse.

 

I wasn't on Jabiim.

 

But I heard it was just like that.

  

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That was fun. Anyways, C&C would be appreciated and please fave for cookies!

  

Happy Building!

 

Diamond

 

PS Oh, and who's going to Brickworld VA?

Meant to post this on Wednesday, but was away on holiday so couldn't do it. Anyway, here it it is.

 

On 22nd July 1298 he Battle of Falkirk took place between the forces of Scotland under William Wallace and an English army under Edward I. A pivotal moment in the First War of Scottish Independence, it would be a significant defeat for the Scots leading to Wallace resigning as Guardian of Scotland.

 

In September 1297 the Scots had inflicted a crushing defeat upon the English at the Battle of Striling Bridge. Since then Wallace and his army had been able to travel south with little opposition and raid the countryside along the Scottish / English border. Hearing of the defeat at Stirling, Edward hastily agreed a truce with the French king, Philip the Fair and returned to England to prepare a counterstrike. He assembled a force of around 15,000 men, including some 10,500 Welshmen. Edward ordered his army to assemble at Roxburgh in the Scottish Borders on June 25th where he remained until July 3rd.

 

He reached Kirkliston in two weeks, where he awaited supplies expected to arrive along the coastal ports, delayed due to weather. There he was forced to deal with a mutiny among his Welsh troops but on July 20th was able to move on, reaching Linlithgow on the 21st. Hearing that a Scottish army was at Torwood, near Falkirk, he decided to place his army south of the town.

 

​The Wallace’s army numbered around 6,000, perhaps consisting of four schiltrons with about 1,000 men each, in addition to the cavalry and archers. Absent however, were forces under the Comyns and Robert Bruce. Also absent was Andrew Moray, co-victor with Wallace at the Battle of Stirling Bridge, having been mortally wounded in that battle. It was Moray who used the schiltrons offensively.

 

The schiltrons formed the backbone of the Scottish army, consisting chiefly of spearmen arranged in a circular formation, with the long spears pointing outwards. At Falkirk it is thought four were arranged with archers filling the gaps between them and some 500 knights supporting them to their rear. When in formation however schiltrons were essentially static and at Falkirk they were fortified by stakes driven into the ground before them, with ropes between. In front of them was an area of marshy ground which would make an English charge difficult.

 

It was therefore up to the English to advance and since they were eager to do battle, advance they did. Their cavalry was divided into four battalions with the Earl of Lincoln leading from the right but moving left to avoid the marshy ground; they were followed by the Earl of Surrey's horse. Anthony Bek and Edward’s horse moved around the right of the marshy ground. Lincoln and Bek charged aggressively and Lincoln quickly routed the Scottish cavalry.

 

The Scots bowmen commanded by Sir John Stewart of Bonkill, the younger brother of the High Steward of Scotland, stood their ground and were quickly destroyed. But the schiltrons held firm, with the knights making little impression on the dense forest of long spears, and 111 horses were killed in the vain attempts. Edward's cavalry fell back as his infantry and archers arrived.

 

​Edward's longbowmen were brought into place and quickly overcame the inexperienced force of badly armed Scottish archers. The schiltrons were an easy target; they had no defence and nowhere to hide. The hail of arrows was supplemented by crossbow and slingshot. Unable to retreat or attack the schiltrons were cut to pieces, the battle lost almost as soon as the first arrows began to fall. The English cavalry waited, this time observing the King's command, until the Scots ranks were thin enough to allow them to penetrate the Scottish formation and cause whatever damage they could. The English footsoldiers, who had been advancing during the English barrage on the Scottish formations, closed the distance and the schiltrons finally started to break and scatter. Wallace managed to escape and the surviving Scots fled into the woods.

 

Casualties among the Scottish leaders were not particularly heavy, but did include Wallace's second-in-command, Sir John de Graham, as well as Sir John Stewart of Bonkill, and Macduff of Fife. According to the historian Stuart Reid, "while unquestionably a good partisan leader, William Wallace's military abilities were simply not up to the job of organizing, training and leading a conventional military force." At Falkirk, Wallace "simply drew up his army in an open field and froze."

 

Edward occupied Stirling and raided Perth, St. Andrews and Ayrshire. Yet, he retreated to Carlisle by September 9th. By this time Wallace had resigned as Guardian of Scotland in favour of Robert the Bruce, Earl of Carrick and future king, and John Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, King John Balliol's nephew. Edward invaded again in the summer of 1300 and so began a new chapter of the First War of Scottish Independence.

 

This model was created for a Brick to the Past Blog: www.bricktothepast.com/blog-to-the-past/battle-of-falkirk

 

This model was made for Brick to the Past. Brick to the Past specialise in crating massive, detailed and meticulously researched historically themed LEGO® models. You can follow us on:

 

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twitter.com/bricktothepast

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On this day in 1780 the English prison reformer, social reformer & Quaker Elizabeth Fry was born.

 

Elizabeth Fry was one of Britain's most influential 19th century social reformers and is best known for her work on improving the conditions of Britain's gaols. Because of her work, first on the treatment of female prisoners at Newgate Prison and then more generally on the conditions in British and European gaols, she has often been referred to as the "angel of prisons".

  

Elizabeth was born on May 21st 1780 in Gurney Court, off Magdalen Street, Norwich, Norfolk, England into a prominent Quaker family, the Gurneys. Her father, John Gurney (1749–1809), was a partner in Gurney's Bank. Her mother, Catherine, was a member of the Barclay family who were among the founders of Barclays Bank. Her mother died when Elizabeth was twelve years old so as one of the oldest girls in the family, she was partly responsible for the care and education of the younger children.

 

She married Joseph Fry, who was also a Quaker, in August 1800 at the Norwich Goat Lane Friends Meeting House and moved to St Mildred's Court in the City of London. In 1811 she was recorded as a minister of the Religious Society of Friends.

 

Prompted by a family friend, Stephen Grellet, Fry visited Newgate Prison in 1813. The conditions she saw there horrified her. The women's section was overcrowded with women and children, some of whom had not even received a trial. The prisoners did their own cooking and washing in the small cells in which they slept on straw.

  

She returned the following day with food and clothes for some prisoners. She was unable to personally further her work for nearly four years because of difficulties within the Fry family, including financial difficulties in the Fry bank.

 

Fry returned in 1816 and was eventually able to fund a prison school for the children who were imprisoned with their mothers. Rather than attempt to impose discipline on the women, she suggested rules and then asked the prisoners to vote on them. In 1817 she helped found the Association for the Reformation of the Female Prisoners in Newgate. This association provided materials for women so that they could learn to sew patchwork which was calming and also allowed skills to develop, such as needlework and knitting which could offer employment when they were out of prison and then could earn money for themselves. This approach was copied elsewhere and led to the eventual creation of the British Ladies' Society for Promoting the Reformation of Female Prisoners in 1821. She also promoted the idea of rehabilitation instead of harsh punishment which was taken on by the city authorities in London as well as many other authorities and prisons.

 

Elizabeth Fry also campaigned for the rights and welfare of prisoners who were being transported. The women of Newgate Prison were taken through the streets of London in open carts, often in chains, huddled together with their few possessions. They were pelted with rotten food and filth by the people of the city. The fear was often enough to make women condemned to transportation riot on the evening before. Fry's first action was to persuade the Governor of Newgate prison to send the women in closed carriages and spare them this last indignity before transportation. She visited prison ships and persuaded captains to implement systems to ensure each woman and child would at least get a share of food and water on the long journey. Later she arranged each woman to be given scraps of material and sewing tools so that they could use the long journey to make quilts and have something to sell as well as useful skills when they reached their destination. She also included a bible and useful items such as string and knives and forks in this vital care package. Elizabeth Fry visited 106 transport ships and saw 12,000 convicts. Her work helped to start a movement for the abolition of transportation. Transportation was officially abolished in 1837, however Elizabeth Fry was still visiting transportation ships until 1843.

 

Fry wrote in her book Prisons in Scotland and the North of England that she stayed the night in some of the prisons and invited nobility to come and stay and see for themselves the conditions prisoners lived in. Her kindness helped her gain the friendship of the prisoners and they began to try to improve their conditions for themselves. Thomas Fowell Buxton, Fry's brother-in-law, was elected to Parliament for Weymouth and began to promote her work among his fellow MPs. In 1818 Fry gave evidence to a House of Commons committee on the conditions prevalent in British prisons, becoming the first woman to present evidence in Parliament.

 

Her humanitarian work didn’t stop at prisons. For example, she helped the homeless, establishing a "nightly shelter" in London after seeing the body of a young boy in the winter of 1819/1820. She also campaigned for the abolition of the slave trade and opened a training school for nurses. Her programme inspired Florence Nightingale, who took a team of Fry's nurses to assist wounded soldiers in the Crimean War.

  

Her work gained her admiration from people in high places. One such was Queen Victoria, who granted her an audience a few times before she was Queen and contributed money to her cause after she ascended to the throne. Another admirer was Robert Peel who passed several acts to further her cause including the Gaols Act 1823. The act was however largely ineffective, because there were no inspectors to make sure that it was being followed.

 

Fry died from a stroke in Ramsgate, England, on October 12th 1845. From 2001–2016, Fry was depicted on the reverse of £5 notes issued by the Bank of England.

 

This model was made for Brick to the Past. Brick to the Past specialise in crating massive, detailed and meticulously researched historically themed LEGO® models. You can follow us on:

 

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<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

 

Location: Triskelion: Date: July 22nd, 2016:

10:59: A.M. :

 

:Shield training center :

 

( Captain america is training Spider-man )

 

Spider-man: "There's the signal for lunch, Cap! I don't know about you, but training makes me hungry!"

 

Captain America catches his shield, he just threw at spider-man.

 

Steve: "It's only 11:00, Peter, We still have another half- hour."

 

Spider-man lands on the wall, facing Cap.

 

Spider-man: "What?! 11:00!? Man, time sure doesn't fly, when your working hard!"

 

Captain america sighs, and throws his shield at spider-man, to dodge.

 

Steve: "This isn't really work, you kn-"

 

CRASH!!!****BANG!!!!****

 

*sirens* *sirens*

 

Spider-man: "What the heck was that!?"

 

Captain-america: "I don't know, but it didn't sound good."

 

Spider-man: "Let's go find out!"

 

Spider-man instantly swings over to the blast door, and opens it, swinging out, into the hall beyond.

 

Captain america: "Wait! Spider-man!.. ugh, that kid!"

 

Captain america pursues Spider-man down the corridors, towards the lower level, from which the explosion came from.

Both enter Level 5B, A large hangar, used for storage.

On the far side of the wall, a huge hole has been blasted, and in the middle of it, coming towards them, is a large group of Hydra footmen.

 

Spider-man: "Great. I'ts that crabby guy with the messed up face, and his goons."

 

Captain america: "The Red Skull..."

 

Name: Red skull:

origin: German commander of a powerful force known as HYDRA, an elite science division:

Danger level: high:

 

Red skull: Ah! Captain america! Joined shield I see? And still wearing the same spangly costume?

 

Captain-america: "What do you want, Schmidt?

 

Red skull: "The answer to your question is simple Captain. Revenge. Something I intend to get!"

 

__________________________________________________

  

Snot floors are sooo veryyyy fun to build. XP

Another one of those builds for the "contest" between me and the other two guys. Unfortunately, Andrew had to go on a trip, and he might not be building for this anymore.

The theme for this one was "superheroes" so, i decided to make some sort of shield base, like the ones in some of the Marvel TV shows.

Tell me what you think, overall, the build was fun, thou i think the story could use some work. ;)

 

Thanks guys! C&C are appreciated! God bless!

~jalex~

      

She get's an A+ for great social skills. Teething/biting is better. Potty training is going well --fewer and fewer accidents. But daytime crate training proves to be difficult...mainly because she wants to be with us all of the time. Today we tried leaving her in the crate and going outside so she'd be alone in the house. Not good. Puppy class teacher gave me homework on how to make it better.

 

Well, between taking her for her morning hike, taking her out for socialization, and keeping her tethered to me for potty training---putting her in and out of the crate a dozen times a day until she get's comfortable with it just seems daunting. How on earth do people who work full time train their puppies? I'm retired and it eats up my entire day. Not complaining.....just sayin'.

The following information is from the Flying Legends website.

 

Aircraft Type: Hawker Hurricane Mk.1 R4118 G-HUPW

Operator: Bygone Aviation Ltd

Year of Manufacture: 1940

Powered by: Rolls Royce Merlin III

Colour Scheme: RAF 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron

 

Built by Gloster Aircraft Co.

 

Delivered new to 605 Squadron on the 17th August 1940, R4118 was thrown into the heat of battle against the Luftwaffe from her base in Croydon. In the hands of Bunny Currant, Archie Milne and Bob Foster, she flew 49 sorties, shooting down or damaging five enemy aircraft before she herself was battle-damaged and moved from the front line for repair.

 

After extensive work to fix the damage inflicted by the Luftwaffe, she was taken on charge by 111 Squadron at Dyce in January 1941 where she flew on patrol over the North Sea and was again in combat. But with newer types of enemy aircraft entering service by this stage of the war, the Mk1 Hurricane – work horse of the Battle of Britain – was becoming increasing obsolete in front-line service, and R4118 found a second career as a training aircraft in 59 and 56 Operational Training Units.

 

By December 1943, with the threat of a Japanese invasion of India looming large, R4118 was crated in Cardiff and shipped to India as a training aircraft. However, she was never needed and remained in her packing case in Bombay until 1947 when she was struck off charge and donated to Banaras Hindu University for engineering instruction.

 

There she stayed, largely forgotten by the world and slowly decaying in the corner of a courtyard, until retired businessman and restoration enthusiast Peter Vacher discovered her in 1996 and determined to bring her back to Britain for restoration to flying condition.

 

Since her debut airshow season in 2005, R4118 has been acquired by Hurricane Heritage, and remains a regular attraction at displays across the country. Whilst her more famous counterpart – the Spitfire – holds a more prominent place in the minds of the public, R4118 and her Hurricane Heritage stable mate Hurricane P3717, serve as a poignant reminder of the nerve, bravery and skill of the young men who flew them and that the Hurricane force destroyed more than twice as many enemy aircraft during The Battle as all of our other defenses combined.

Click to listen

 

📷▼FAPPLE for POCKET GACHA

Get your free HUD here

 

THE BONDAGE BISTRO GACHA

➵ 20 items (15 Common/5 Rares)

 

📷▼[BISTRO CHAIRS & TABLES]

● Bistro Cunnilingus Chair RARE

➵ with Dominant & Submissive-enabled HUD/Menu

● Bistro Fellatio Chair RARE

➵ with Dominant & Submissive-enabled HUD/Menu

● Bistro Chair

➵ with Male/Female solo sits

● Bistro Table With Umbrella

● Bistro Table Small

 

📷▼[FOOD]

● Coffee and Pastry (on Table With Umbrella)

● Coffee (on Table Small)

● Bistro Breakfast Cart

 

📷▼[STORAGE CABINETS]

● Bistro Bar and Cage (in porch corner)

➵ with RLV capture HUD/Menu

● Fill my holes Box RARE (under Amsterdam timezone clock)

➵ with Dominant & Submissive-enabled HUD/Menu

 

📷▼[KNEELERS]

● Bistro Sub Parking RARE rack (against fence)

➵ with Submissive-enabled HUD/Menu for kneeling animation

● Bistro Sub Pouf

➵ with kneel poses

 

📷▼[ALL OTHER GACHA PROPS]

● Bistro Flower Vase (on Table With Umbrella)

● Wooden Fence

● Bistro Art 1 (left, on porch's brick wall)

● Bistro Art 2 (right on porch's brick wall)

● Bistro Planter (by entrance of porch railing)

● Bistro Magazines (on porch floor)

● Sausage Training penis pacifiers (on porch floor)

● Mr. Grey Can't See You Now horse sculpture (inside of house)

 

* Size of sculpture increased for pic. Added land impact applies.

 

➵* Read more about the THE BONDAGE BISTRO GACHA on the FAPPLE BLOG

  

▼[GARDEN DECOR — Clockwise from left]

● HPMD Garden Tree08 with Lights (behind fence)

● APPLE FALL Potting Shelf (against fence)

● FLOORPLAN wooden crate (packaging item used as a prop)

● [KEKE] Hard To Find Plates Stack (on Bistro Table Small)

● AISLING Stone Floor (part of the Old Fountain set)

● APPLE FALL Oxeye Daisy Patch (under Table With Umbrella)

● HAYABUSA DESIGN Grass with wind effect M5 v1-1 LPE T1 ground covering

● ARTISAN FANTASY Succulent Log Planters

 

▼[PORCH DECOR — Clockwise from left]

● :HAIKEI: Wanna Love You GACHA / {4} potted plant (under porch paintings)

● APPLE FALL Bea Reading Chair in Worn Leather (in porch area)

● SEVEN EMPORIUM The Filmore Factory Clock

● SEVEN EMPORIUM Filmore Los Angeles/Amsterdam Sign

● [KEKE] Hard To Find Bowls Stack (in porch area on Bistro Bar and Cage)

● FANCY DECOR Coffee Table

● JUNK Zebra rug

● ARISKEA Wild Boho Plant Hanger [Foliage]

● ARISKEA Miu Eucalyptus Potted jug (on floor)

● :HAIKEI: Belong To You / GACHA / {5} succulent terrarium (on floor)

● ZIGANA Hanging Books (under Amsterdam timezone clock)

● ZIGANA Bookshelf (on floor against glass paneled window)

● APPLE FALL Au Pain Sourbread Baguette loaves (on Bistro Table Small)

● APPLE FALL Crumpled Newspaper (on floor near magazine basket

● ARISKEA Ophelia Big Plant (size increased for photo)➵ * Available this month at FAMESHED

 

▼[HOUSE]

● SCARLET CREATIVE Gorgeous Rose in Stone

 

▼[HOUSE DECOR]

● SOY Vacant Frame Vertical (in second floor room)

● SOY Vacant Frame Horizontal (ground floor, above dining table)

● APPLE FALL Province Dining Table & Throw Cloth in Blue Gingham

● REVIVAL Convent Bench II (with pillows)

● REVIVAL Convent Bench I (without pillows, near horse sculpture)

● ARISKEA Freesia Ceilling Lamp in Caramel & Ocean

● ARISKEA Freesia Wood Marble Table

● THE LOFT & ARIA Zoete Flower Arrangment

● ARIA Olympia Vase With Gypsophila

● THE LOFT Alderan Rug Slate

 

* Prints in SOY frames, stylist's own.

Young Heroes Vol 2 - Issue #5 "Below The Pay Grade"

 

*Luna parkours his way up the wall and kicks off it slamming his fist into one of the “Food Fight” members knocking him or her to the ground with ease, he didn't even have to use his staff. These guys were the easiest foes he'd ever faced and by the looks of Felix downstairs, he too found it quite enjoyable as he used his monster to swat away the rest of the members like flies. Luna turned around hearing an elevated heartbeat behind him with his enhanced headphones and turned around kicking at the man dressed as a Mango. However, within a blink of an eye, Mango is grabbed by a hooded figure who teleports away with him. It takes Luna a moment to realize that that was the newest member of the team, Smokepunk. He sees an explosion of smoke shortly after and watches as she drops him from the ladder landing on his chest.*

 

Smokepunk: "Dibs!"

 

Luna: *Huffs* "Metahumans, always cheating."

 

Felix: "That's a raci-is-sm!"

 

*Luna rolls his eyes dusting off his hands and leans over the railing where he sees Felix's monster shield him from a sudden rain of bullets which come from nowhere. Smokepunk is quick to teleport back up beside Luna as he watches the gangster Loudmouth turn towards him with his Tommygun firing it at him. He ducks for cover but a hand grabs his shoulder and pulls him briskly into a dark abyss where his whole body shifts place, the air in his lungs, the organs in his body, all jerked to one side. Seconds later he emerges back out from the shadows like a deer caught in headlights gripping onto the nearest crate panting. He looks back seeing Smokepunk ducked beside him holding her bat completely unaffected by what he assumed was teleportation. Gunfire snaps him out of it and he peeks out from behind the crate seeing Loudmouth shooting his clip harmlessly into Felix's monster. Loudmouth curses and steps back about to unleash his sound-based attack, one that Luna had dealt with before. He's about to run to Felix's aid but sees him handle it quite well, his Monster grabs Loudmouth's face in its hand and lifts him up off his feet smashing him a few inches deep through the concrete.*

 

Felix: "Take that you bad man!"

 

Loudmouth: *wheezing*

 

Luna: "Good job he's durable."

 

Smokepunk: "Would be better if he wasn't." *laughs*

 

*Luna didn't really find that funny but when he catches her sparkling emerald eyes he lets out the worst masculine giggle of all time and instantly regrets it. He looks away from her confused look and quickly walks on ahead up to Felix cursing himself. He stands over Loudmouth who coughs in a small cloud of debris wheezing, Felix was a little rough but Luna didn't know if he could alter the strength of that Monster of his which now evaporates in a faint mist, probably something he should tell Vega about for training. Luna kneels down beside the incapacitated gangster and looks up seeing Smokepunk smash her bat through one of the creates examining the contents inside the packaging, she glances at him nodding to Luna.*

 

Luna: "Why are you distributing M-Pill?"

 

Loudmouth: "Money!"

 

Luna: "That would explain the cheap hired help. What happened to your better goons?"

 

Loudmouth: "A purple portal opened up when my men were loading the truck, then some sort of grenade came through it. Before I knew it my men just became simpletons! They just walked through the portal and left the crates outside, the couple regular humans I had there weren't able to move it! Cost me a fortune!"

 

Smokepunk: "Sounds like the M-Pill is being weaponized, doesn't seem like Alpha's style."

 

Luna: "He definitely must be recruiting the drugged Metas though. Loudmouth, do you know who it is?"

 

Loudmouth: "If I did they'd be dead! I know someone who can help you though. Snowdrop."

 

Luna: "Hmm, last time I saw her a building was on top of her. Then a blizzard came along."

 

Loudmouth: "Hah! That would've been her brother, Blizzard."

   

On this day in 1780 the English prison reformer, social reformer & Quaker Elizabeth Fry was born.

 

Elizabeth Fry was one of Britain's most influential 19th century social reformers and is best known for her work on improving the conditions of Britain's gaols. Because of her work, first on the treatment of female prisoners at Newgate Prison and then more generally on the conditions in British and European gaols, she has often been referred to as the "angel of prisons".

  

Elizabeth was born on May 21st 1780 in Gurney Court, off Magdalen Street, Norwich, Norfolk, England into a prominent Quaker family, the Gurneys. Her father, John Gurney (1749–1809), was a partner in Gurney's Bank. Her mother, Catherine, was a member of the Barclay family who were among the founders of Barclays Bank. Her mother died when Elizabeth was twelve years old so as one of the oldest girls in the family, she was partly responsible for the care and education of the younger children.

 

She married Joseph Fry, who was also a Quaker, in August 1800 at the Norwich Goat Lane Friends Meeting House and moved to St Mildred's Court in the City of London. In 1811 she was recorded as a minister of the Religious Society of Friends.

 

Prompted by a family friend, Stephen Grellet, Fry visited Newgate Prison in 1813. The conditions she saw there horrified her. The women's section was overcrowded with women and children, some of whom had not even received a trial. The prisoners did their own cooking and washing in the small cells in which they slept on straw.

  

She returned the following day with food and clothes for some prisoners. She was unable to personally further her work for nearly four years because of difficulties within the Fry family, including financial difficulties in the Fry bank.

 

Fry returned in 1816 and was eventually able to fund a prison school for the children who were imprisoned with their mothers. Rather than attempt to impose discipline on the women, she suggested rules and then asked the prisoners to vote on them. In 1817 she helped found the Association for the Reformation of the Female Prisoners in Newgate. This association provided materials for women so that they could learn to sew patchwork which was calming and also allowed skills to develop, such as needlework and knitting which could offer employment when they were out of prison and then could earn money for themselves. This approach was copied elsewhere and led to the eventual creation of the British Ladies' Society for Promoting the Reformation of Female Prisoners in 1821. She also promoted the idea of rehabilitation instead of harsh punishment which was taken on by the city authorities in London as well as many other authorities and prisons.

 

Elizabeth Fry also campaigned for the rights and welfare of prisoners who were being transported. The women of Newgate Prison were taken through the streets of London in open carts, often in chains, huddled together with their few possessions. They were pelted with rotten food and filth by the people of the city. The fear was often enough to make women condemned to transportation riot on the evening before. Fry's first action was to persuade the Governor of Newgate prison to send the women in closed carriages and spare them this last indignity before transportation. She visited prison ships and persuaded captains to implement systems to ensure each woman and child would at least get a share of food and water on the long journey. Later she arranged each woman to be given scraps of material and sewing tools so that they could use the long journey to make quilts and have something to sell as well as useful skills when they reached their destination. She also included a bible and useful items such as string and knives and forks in this vital care package. Elizabeth Fry visited 106 transport ships and saw 12,000 convicts. Her work helped to start a movement for the abolition of transportation. Transportation was officially abolished in 1837, however Elizabeth Fry was still visiting transportation ships until 1843.

 

Fry wrote in her book Prisons in Scotland and the North of England that she stayed the night in some of the prisons and invited nobility to come and stay and see for themselves the conditions prisoners lived in. Her kindness helped her gain the friendship of the prisoners and they began to try to improve their conditions for themselves. Thomas Fowell Buxton, Fry's brother-in-law, was elected to Parliament for Weymouth and began to promote her work among his fellow MPs. In 1818 Fry gave evidence to a House of Commons committee on the conditions prevalent in British prisons, becoming the first woman to present evidence in Parliament.

 

Her humanitarian work didn’t stop at prisons. For example, she helped the homeless, establishing a "nightly shelter" in London after seeing the body of a young boy in the winter of 1819/1820. She also campaigned for the abolition of the slave trade and opened a training school for nurses. Her programme inspired Florence Nightingale, who took a team of Fry's nurses to assist wounded soldiers in the Crimean War.

  

Her work gained her admiration from people in high places. One such was Queen Victoria, who granted her an audience a few times before she was Queen and contributed money to her cause after she ascended to the throne. Another admirer was Robert Peel who passed several acts to further her cause including the Gaols Act 1823. The act was however largely ineffective, because there were no inspectors to make sure that it was being followed.

 

Fry died from a stroke in Ramsgate, England, on October 12th 1845. From 2001–2016, Fry was depicted on the reverse of £5 notes issued by the Bank of England.

 

This model was made for Brick to the Past. Brick to the Past specialise in crating massive, detailed and meticulously researched historically themed LEGO® models. You can follow us on:

 

www.facebook.com/bricktothepast

twitter.com/bricktothepast

www.bricktothepast.com

The following occurs during The Dark Knight: Knight of Gotham #44-47

  

————————————————————————————————

  

With the thought of the attack on Wayne Manor, and the subsequent attempt on Alfred’s life, as well as his inability to rescue his father from his kidnapping teeming in his mind, Tim solemnly landed the Batwing inside of the Batcave. Exiting the craft’s cockpit, he was greeted by the butler, whos first question was,

  

“…is your father alright?” Tim remained silent, prompting Bruce, who had just walked over to join them, to ask,

  

“Is he…?”

  

“Dead? I don’t know. They made a point of making sure I heard the whole thing.” Examining Tim’s tattered suit, and the way he cradled his arm, both Alfred and Bruce began to make statements reassuring him that his father must still be alive. All he heard Bruce say through the angered ringing in his ears was,

  

“…they couldn’t take the two of us…they had to take the closest thing to father figures we have…”

  

“Closest thing to father figures? That man IS my dad Bruce!” Tim yelled, cutting Bruce off, “They didn’t take him because they couldn’t take you, they took him because he’s my dad! He might not know it but he’s everything to me. Why do you think I was so angry when he left Gotham in the first place!?” Bruce began to respond, but Tim was feeling something that had been building up inside him since the Cluemaster case: he began to finally understand what Jason had felt for years. The pain of losing everyone and everything, prompting him to cut Bruce’s sentiments off with, “The last thing I’m going to let happen is another innocent die on us. First Steph’s family, now my own family. I swear Bruce, we’re not losing him.” There was a silence, followed by Tim removing his cape and mask while Alfred placed a hand on his shoulder. Then, Tim asked, “How did he know about us?” Bruce’s face turned to disdain as he thought of the Crimson Knight and answered,

  

“I’m not sure. But he’s known for a while.”

  

“…He’s known for a while?” Tim asked, his temper rising again. Bruce described how during their altercation in the sewers the Knight had used his name, prompting Tim to respond, “You should’ve told me. You’re Bruce Wayne, one of the most high profile figures in Gotham and you thought that he only knew your identity? Buddy Standler could figure out who Robin is if he knew who Batman was!”

  

“It wasn’t important to you at the time.”

  

“WASN’T IMPORTANT?!” Bruce attempted to calm Tim by explaining how it had been during the Film Freak case, after listening to all that he had to say the latter began to walk away, but not before saying, “You should’ve told me, Bruce. If something happens to him…it’s your fault.”

  

————————————————————————————————

  

Tim spent most of the next day resting in Wayne Manor. Having connected his laptop to the Batcomputer, he sat with his arm in a sling while attempting each and every approach for fast bone repair. At many points in the day, he considered calling Stephanie on the communicator he had given to her, but deemed no reason he could think up important enough. At other points, he closed his laptop and attempted meditation. It had always been a vital part of training with Bruce to meditate in order to bury the feelings that could potentially make one of family go criminal, and in Tim’s case it seemed to be working. He envisioned his father, safe, and out of Gotham. The Crimson Knight falling into darkness, javelins of light shot through their chest. He envisioned Stephanie. Just Stephanie. Sitting with him, staying with him after all of the time apart-

  

“For too long this city has allowed itself to be governed by figures in the shadows…” The broadcast had barely started but Tim already recognized the voice coming from all television sets in Wayne Manor, “The Batman, his disciples, the cowards at the GCPD…” Within the minute, Tim had relieved himself of the string and was already in the new elevator that led down into the Batcave, with the Crimson Knight’s broadcast still echoing off the walls upstairs, “They claim to serve the will of the people…” The crate that contained his suit, mask, and cape was in hand, and before he knew it Tim was standing next to Bruce, who has clad in all but his cowl and clenched a sword in his left hand, “…but they seek to control your will.”

  

“The Knight?” Tim asked sheepishly, having not talked to Bruce since his outburst the night previously.

  

“He’s finally stepped into the light. He’s at…”

  

“City Hall. It’s on every channel. Couldn’t shut him up if I wanted to…” Tim went silent, looking into the eyes of the monster on the Batcomputer’s screens, “You think my dad’s with him?”

  

“Certainly. Suit up.” Dropping the crate, Tim quickly stepped into his suit and cape while Bruce and Alfred talked nearby. After reaching Bruce’s side, the young Robin felt compelled to tell his mentor about Stephanie, and how she could potentially help, but opted instead to remain silent as Bruce said, “Let’s move out. City Hall isn’t about to save itself.” Nodding silently, Tim placed his mask gently on his face and leapt into the Batwing’s passenger seat. Having a sudden epiphany, he turned on his comm and spoke into it quickly,

  

“You got eyes on a TV?” There was a moment of static before the unforgettable voice of Stephanie Brown replied on the other end,

  

“Wish I didn’t.” Tim smiled to himself before finishing his message to her in time for Bruce to climb into the driver’s seat,

  

“City Hall. Twenty minutes. It’s time to end this. Once and for all.”

Ina Garten is an engineer and chef extraordinaire!

She worked for Admiral Hyman Rickover in DC, helping develop our nuclear-powered submarine. When she saw an ad in the New York Times that the Long Island deli and specialty shop "Barefoot Contesse" was for sale... 😍

 

Did you know that the beautiful Ina Garten, the fabulous Chef, and Engineer, worked for Rickover before purchasing "The Barefoot Contessa," a delicatessen on Long Island? I will have to do a series on her. She used her engineering experience to perfect recipes for her Deli.

 

Wikipedia doesn't mention that but it has a wealth of detail about Ina:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ina_Garten

 

Ina Rosenberg Garten (/ˈaɪnə/ eye-nə; born February 2, 1948)[1] is an American author and host of the Food Network program Barefoot Contessa, and a former staff member of the White House Office of Management and Budget.[2]

 

Garten had no formal training in cooking and baking; she taught herself culinary techniques with the aid of French and New England cookbooks. Later, she relied on intuition and feedback from friends and customers to refine her recipes. She was mentored primarily by Eli Zabar, owner of Eli's Manhattan and Eli's Breads, and food-show host and author Martha Stewart. Among her dishes are cœur à la crème, celery root remoulade, pear clafouti, and a simplified version of beef bourguignon. Her culinary career began with her gourmet food store, Barefoot Contessa; Garten then expanded her activities to several best-selling cookbooks, magazine columns, self-branded convenience products, and a popular Food Network television show.

 

Contents [hide]

1Early life

2Career

2.1Barefoot Contessa store

2.2Barefoot Contessa cookbooks

2.3Barefoot Contessa on Food Network

2.4Barefoot Contessa Pantry

2.5Barefoot Contessa other publications

3Personal life

4Criticism

5Works

5.1Books

5.2Magazine columns

5.3Television

6Notes

7References

8External links

Early life[edit]

Born Ina Rosenberg[3] to a Jewish family[4] in Brooklyn, New York and raised in Stamford, Connecticut,[1] Garten was one of two children born to Charles H. Rosenberg, a surgeon specializing in otolaryngology, and his wife, Florence.[5] Encouraged to excel in school, she showed an aptitude for science, and has said she uses that scientific mindset while experimenting with recipes.[6] Garten's mother, an intellectual with an interest in opera, refused her daughter's requests to assist her in the kitchen and instead directed her to concentrate on schoolwork. Garten described her father as a lively individual with many friends, and has commented that she shares more characteristics with him than with her mother.[7]

 

At 15, she met her future husband, Jeffrey Garten, on a trip to visit her brother at Dartmouth College.[5] After high school, she attended Syracuse University but postponed her educational pursuits to marry.[1]

 

Career[edit]

On December 22, 1968, Rosenberg and Garten were married in Stamford and soon relocated to Fort Bragg, North Carolina. She began to dabble in cooking and entertaining in an effort to occupy her time while her husband served his four-year military tour during the Vietnam War; she also acquired her pilot's license.[8] After her husband had completed his military service, the couple journeyed to Paris, France, for a four-month camping vacation that Garten has described as the birth of her love for French cuisine. During this trip, she experienced open-air markets, produce stands, and fresh cooking ingredients for the first time.[9] Upon returning to the U.S., she began to cultivate her culinary abilities by studying [ [Note 'the volumes of' should be deleted] Julia Child's seminal cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking.[9] Her weekly dinner party tradition began taking shape during this time, and she refined her home entertaining skills when she and her husband moved to Washington, D.C., in 1972.

 

In Washington, Garten worked in the White House and took business courses at George Washington University, eventually earning an MBA,[2] while her husband worked in the State Department and completed his graduate studies. Garten was originally employed as a low-level government aide, and climbed the political ladder to the Office of Management and Budget; eventually, she was assigned the position of budget analyst, which entailed writing the nuclear energy budget and policy papers on nuclear centrifuge plants for Presidents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter.[10][11]

 

Strained by the pressures of her work and the stressful nature of Washington, Garten again turned to cooking and entertaining while also buying, refurbishing, and reselling homes for profit in the Dupont Circle and Kalorama neighborhoods.[10] The profits from these sales gave Garten the means to make her next purchase, the Barefoot Contessa specialty food store.

 

Barefoot Contessa store[edit]

Garten left her government job in 1978 after spotting an ad for a 400-square-foot (37 m2) specialty food store called Barefoot Contessa in Westhampton Beach, New York "My job in Washington was intellectually exciting and stimulating but it wasn't me at all," she explained four years later.[2]

 

She made a hasty decision to purchase the store after traveling to view it, and moved to New York to assume ownership and management. The store had been named by its original owner in tribute to the 1954 film starring Ava Gardner; Garten kept the name when she took over, as it meshed well with her idea of an "elegant but earthy" lifestyle,[12] but as of 2006 she had not seen the film.[13]

 

Within a year, Garten had moved Barefoot Contessa across Main Street from its original location to a larger property. The shop quickly outgrew this new location, and in 1985 Garten relocated the store again to the newly vacated premises of gourmet shop Dean & DeLuca in the prosperous Long Island village of East Hampton. In contrast to Westhampton's beach season atmosphere, East Hampton is a year-round community, providing a larger, wealthier demographic as a customer base. In East Hampton, Garten expanded the store from its original 400 square feet (37 m2) to more than 3,000 square feet (280 m2), over seven times its original size. In this new, larger space, the store specialized in delicacies such as lobster Cobb salad, caviar, imported cheeses, and locally grown produce.[14]

 

While doing much of the cooking herself, Garten also employed local chefs and bakers as the business grew, including Anna Pump (who later established the Loaves & Fishes bakery and Bridgehampton Inn). Garten has credited Eli Zabar with the inspiration for her main cooking method, in which "all you have to do is cook to enhance the ingredients."[15] The shop was praised in the press by celebrity clientele such as Steven Spielberg and Lauren Bacall.

 

In 1996, after two decades of owning and operating Barefoot Contessa, Garten again found herself seeking a change and sold the store to two employees, Amy Forst and Parker Hodges, while retaining ownership of the building itself. Unsure of what career step to take after selling the store, she took a six-month sabbatical from the culinary scene and built offices above the shop. There, she studied the stock market and attempted to sketch out plans for potential business ventures. Her website, Barefoot Contessa, became high-profile at this time as she began offering her coffees and a few other items for purchase online.

 

By 2003, Barefoot Contessa had become such a landmark gathering place for the affluent New York town that director Nancy Meyers chose to use the store as one of the settings for the Jack Nicholson-Diane Keaton film Something's Gotta Give.[14] However, the store was permanently closed in 2004, when the lease expired on the property and negotiations failed between Garten (the owner of the building in which Barefoot Contessa was housed) and the new owners.[16] It has been reported that Garten's refusal to meet lease negotiations was actually a tactic for reclaiming control of the store after Forst and Hodges lost business to competitor Citarella.[17] Ultimately, Garten did not reopen the shop, and instead retained the property for potential new tenants.

 

Barefoot Contessa cookbooks[edit]

 

Barefoot Contessa Cookbook

After consulting with her husband, Garten reemerged in 1999 with her attention turned to publishing. She carried on the Barefoot Contessa name in her 1999 sleeper bestseller, The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook. Containing the recipes that made her store successful, the book far exceeded both Garten's and publisher Clarkson Potter's expectations. After an initial pressing of 35,000 copies, a typical number for a debut cookbook, it immediately required second and third print runs and eventually sold over 100,000 copies in its first year.[18] In 2001, she capitalized on her new-found fame and released Barefoot Contessa Parties!, which also produced high sales and garnered good reviews, and followed this with Barefoot Contessa Family Style in 2002. The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook and Parties! were nominated for 2000 and 2002 James Beard Awards, in the Entertaining & Special Occasion Cookbooks category. Parties! was a surprise entry, as she was considered inexperienced and untrained to compete with fellow nominees, revered French chef Jacques Pépin and international wine expert Brian St. Pierre.

 

Her cookbooks avoid an encyclopedic format, and are modeled on coffee table books. With many color photographs, including a full-page picture facing each recipe, some critics argue that this method sacrifices space that could be used for recipes. Nevertheless, her cookbooks have received positive reviews; in 2005, fellow chef Giada De Laurentiis named Garten one of her favorite authors.[19] As of 2008, Garten's cookbooks have sold over six million copies combined.[citation needed] As of October 2014 she had published nine cookbooks.

 

Her newest cookbook, titled Cooking for Jeffrey was released on October 25, 2016.

 

Barefoot Contessa on Food Network[edit]

See also: Barefoot Contessa

Garten established herself with her cookbooks and appearances on Stewart's show, and then moved into the forefront in 2002 with the debut of her Food Network program.[14] After the success of The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook and Barefoot Contessa Parties!, Garten was approached by Food Network with an offer to host her own television cooking show. She rejected this proposal several times, until the London-based production company responsible for the Nigella Bites was assigned to the deal. She acquiesced to a 13-show season, and Barefoot Contessa[20] premiered in 2002 to a positive reception.[21]

 

Her show features her husband and their friends and generally only hosts celebrities who are her friends.[22] Barefoot Contessa has approximately one million viewers tuned in per episode, and has posted some of Food Network's highest ratings.[5][23]

 

When Martha Stewart was incarcerated in 2004 on charges connected with obstruction of justice in a stock trading case, the press singled out Garten as a possible successor.[24]

 

In 2005, the show was nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award in the category of Best Service Show.[25] In 2009, the show and Garten were once again nominated for Daytime Emmy Awards in the categories of Best Culinary Program and Best Culinary Host, and Garten won her first Emmy in the latter category.[26]

 

That same year, Garten announced that she had signed a three-year contract with Food Network to continue her cooking show, and will release two more cookbooks following Barefoot Contessa at Home. Garten was reportedly awarded the most lucrative contract for a culinary author to date, signing a multimillion-dollar deal for multiple books.[27] She has also been approached several times to develop her own magazine, line of furniture, set of cookware, and chain of boutiques (reminiscent of Stewart's Omnimedia), but has declined these offers, stating she has no interest in further complicating her life. Between 2004 and 2005, Barefoot in Paris sold almost 400,000 copies and rose to number eleven on the New York Times bestseller list.[28]

 

Barefoot Contessa Pantry[edit]

In 2006, Garten launched her own line of packaged cake mixes, marinades, sauces, and preserves, branded as Barefoot Contessa Pantry, with her business partner Frank Newbold [29] and in conjunction with Stonewall Kitchen. These convenience foods are based on her most popular from-scratch recipes, such as coconut cupcakes, maple oatmeal scones, mango chutney, and lemon curd. Pricing of these items is comparatively expensive (for example, the suggested retail price for a single box of brownie mix is ten dollars) and they are only sold through upscale cookware and gourmet shops such as Crate & Barrel, Sur La Table, and Chicago's Fox & Obel Market Cafe. She plans to expand this brand in the near future if the first line of products is very successful.[30]

 

Barefoot Contessa other publications[edit]

After critical acclaim and high sales of her first three cookbooks, she went on to write Barefoot in Paris and several columns for O, The Oprah Magazine. She also serves as the entertaining, cooking, and party planning consultant for the magazine. House Beautiful, a shelter magazine, featured a monthly Garten column entitled "Ask the Barefoot Contessa" until 2011. In this column, she gave cooking, entertaining, and lifestyle tips in response to letters from her readers.[31] She launched a small line of note cards and journals to complement her books, and wrote the forewords for Kathleen King's Tate's Bake Shop Cookbook and Rori Trovato's Dishing With Style. One of her recipes, 'lemon roast chicken with croutons', was featured in The Best American Recipes 2005–2006. Another of Garten's dishes was selected for Today's Kitchen Cookbook, a compilation of the most popular recipes featured on the daily news program The Today Show. For Thanksgiving 2010, her recipes were featured by Google on their homepage[32] In June 2012, she started a Facebook blog and three weeks later had over 100,000 followers.[29]

 

Personal life[edit]

Her husband Jeffrey Garten was Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade and dean of the Yale School of Management. He is now the Juan Trippe Professor in the Practice of International Trade, Finance, and Business at Yale. He can also frequently be seen on her cooking show, assisting his wife with simple tasks or sampling the dishes she has created. They divide their time among Manhattan, East Hampton, and Paris.[9]

]

Garten served as hostess of the 16th Annual Hudson Peconic benefit for Planned Parenthood. Her Food Network show frequently features appearances by her openly gay friends and their partners. Though she has made no explicit statement regarding gay rights or the gay community in general, she did write in one of her books:

 

...We all know that families now aren't necessarily like Ozzie and Harriet (it turns out Ozzie and Harriet's family wasn't all Ozzie and Harriet)... family has a traditional context, but today it's not as simple as two parents with 2-3 kids... it's about relationships... it's about people who are bound together by love and a sense of being responsible for one another... it's spouses with no children, like Jeffrey and me... it's a group of women who meet to cook dinner together once a month... it's a one-parent family with adopted children... it's two men who've made a life together... at the end of the day, all we have is love... getting love, but even more, feeling love...[34]

 

Registered in New York as a Democrat, Garten has contributed to the presidential campaign funds of George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton, John Kerry, and Barack Obama.[35]

 

Garten also sits on the Design Review Board for East Hampton, a panel that grants building permissions and approves architectural and design elements of the village. The board seeks to protect the historical district and further the overall aesthetics of the area.[36]

 

Criticism[edit]

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine has criticized Garten's cookbook Barefoot Contessa: How Easy Is That? for its use of high-fat, high-calorie, and high-cholesterol meat and dairy ingredients.[37][38] In response, Eric Felten of The Wall Street Journal called the report "an assault on cookbooks that dare to venture beyond lentils".[39]

 

Works[edit]

Books[edit]

The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook (1999), Clarkson Potter, ISBN 0-609-60219-5

Barefoot Contessa Parties! Ideas and Recipes For Easy Parties That Are Really Fun (2001)

Barefoot Contessa Family Style: Easy Ideas and Recipes That Make Everyone Feel Like Family (2002)

Barefoot in Paris: Easy French Food You Can Make at Home (2004)

Barefoot Contessa at Home: Everyday Recipes You'll Make Over and Over Again (2006)

Barefoot Contessa Back to Basics: Fabulous Flavor from Simple Ingredients Clarkson Potter. 2008. ISBN 978-1400054350.

Barefoot Contessa: How Easy Is That? Clarkson Potter. 2010. ISBN 978-0307238764.

Barefoot Contessa: Foolproof: Recipes You Can Trust. Clarkson Potter. 2012. ISBN 0307464873. OCLC 776519282 .

Make It Ahead: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook. Clarkson Potter. 2014. ISBN 978-0-307464880. OCLC 875771003 .

Cooking for Jeffrey: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook Clarkson Potter. 2016.

Magazine columns[edit]

"Entertaining is Fun!" (Martha Stewart Living 1999–present)

"Entertaining." (O, The Oprah Magazine 2003–present)

"Ask the Barefoot Contessa." (House Beautiful 2006–present)

On this day in 1780 the English prison reformer, social reformer & Quaker Elizabeth Fry was born.

 

Elizabeth Fry was one of Britain's most influential 19th century social reformers and is best known for her work on improving the conditions of Britain's gaols. Because of her work, first on the treatment of female prisoners at Newgate Prison and then more generally on the conditions in British and European gaols, she has often been referred to as the "angel of prisons".

  

Elizabeth was born on May 21st 1780 in Gurney Court, off Magdalen Street, Norwich, Norfolk, England into a prominent Quaker family, the Gurneys. Her father, John Gurney (1749–1809), was a partner in Gurney's Bank. Her mother, Catherine, was a member of the Barclay family who were among the founders of Barclays Bank. Her mother died when Elizabeth was twelve years old so as one of the oldest girls in the family, she was partly responsible for the care and education of the younger children.

 

She married Joseph Fry, who was also a Quaker, in August 1800 at the Norwich Goat Lane Friends Meeting House and moved to St Mildred's Court in the City of London. In 1811 she was recorded as a minister of the Religious Society of Friends.

 

Prompted by a family friend, Stephen Grellet, Fry visited Newgate Prison in 1813. The conditions she saw there horrified her. The women's section was overcrowded with women and children, some of whom had not even received a trial. The prisoners did their own cooking and washing in the small cells in which they slept on straw.

  

She returned the following day with food and clothes for some prisoners. She was unable to personally further her work for nearly four years because of difficulties within the Fry family, including financial difficulties in the Fry bank.

 

Fry returned in 1816 and was eventually able to fund a prison school for the children who were imprisoned with their mothers. Rather than attempt to impose discipline on the women, she suggested rules and then asked the prisoners to vote on them. In 1817 she helped found the Association for the Reformation of the Female Prisoners in Newgate. This association provided materials for women so that they could learn to sew patchwork which was calming and also allowed skills to develop, such as needlework and knitting which could offer employment when they were out of prison and then could earn money for themselves. This approach was copied elsewhere and led to the eventual creation of the British Ladies' Society for Promoting the Reformation of Female Prisoners in 1821. She also promoted the idea of rehabilitation instead of harsh punishment which was taken on by the city authorities in London as well as many other authorities and prisons.

 

Elizabeth Fry also campaigned for the rights and welfare of prisoners who were being transported. The women of Newgate Prison were taken through the streets of London in open carts, often in chains, huddled together with their few possessions. They were pelted with rotten food and filth by the people of the city. The fear was often enough to make women condemned to transportation riot on the evening before. Fry's first action was to persuade the Governor of Newgate prison to send the women in closed carriages and spare them this last indignity before transportation. She visited prison ships and persuaded captains to implement systems to ensure each woman and child would at least get a share of food and water on the long journey. Later she arranged each woman to be given scraps of material and sewing tools so that they could use the long journey to make quilts and have something to sell as well as useful skills when they reached their destination. She also included a bible and useful items such as string and knives and forks in this vital care package. Elizabeth Fry visited 106 transport ships and saw 12,000 convicts. Her work helped to start a movement for the abolition of transportation. Transportation was officially abolished in 1837, however Elizabeth Fry was still visiting transportation ships until 1843.

 

Fry wrote in her book Prisons in Scotland and the North of England that she stayed the night in some of the prisons and invited nobility to come and stay and see for themselves the conditions prisoners lived in. Her kindness helped her gain the friendship of the prisoners and they began to try to improve their conditions for themselves. Thomas Fowell Buxton, Fry's brother-in-law, was elected to Parliament for Weymouth and began to promote her work among his fellow MPs. In 1818 Fry gave evidence to a House of Commons committee on the conditions prevalent in British prisons, becoming the first woman to present evidence in Parliament.

 

Her humanitarian work didn’t stop at prisons. For example, she helped the homeless, establishing a "nightly shelter" in London after seeing the body of a young boy in the winter of 1819/1820. She also campaigned for the abolition of the slave trade and opened a training school for nurses. Her programme inspired Florence Nightingale, who took a team of Fry's nurses to assist wounded soldiers in the Crimean War.

  

Her work gained her admiration from people in high places. One such was Queen Victoria, who granted her an audience a few times before she was Queen and contributed money to her cause after she ascended to the throne. Another admirer was Robert Peel who passed several acts to further her cause including the Gaols Act 1823. The act was however largely ineffective, because there were no inspectors to make sure that it was being followed.

 

Fry died from a stroke in Ramsgate, England, on October 12th 1845. From 2001–2016, Fry was depicted on the reverse of £5 notes issued by the Bank of England.

 

This model was made for Brick to the Past. Brick to the Past specialise in crating massive, detailed and meticulously researched historically themed LEGO® models. You can follow us on:

 

www.facebook.com/bricktothepast

twitter.com/bricktothepast

www.bricktothepast.com

-Hawker Hurricane Mk.1 R4118 G-HUPW

-Bygone Aviation Ltd

-Rolls Royce Merlin III

-Colour Scheme: RAF 605 Squadron

 

" Said to be the most historic fighter aircraft to have survived the war, Hawker Hurricane Mk1 R4118 was delivered new to 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron at Drem on 17 August 1940. During the Battle of Britain it flew 49 sorties from Croydon and shot down five enemy aircraft.

 

After being battle damaged on 22 October 1940, the aircraft was rebuilt and taken on charge by 111 Squadron at Dyce on 18 January 1941. There it was flown on patrol over the North Sea and was again in combat. Over the following two years it was used primarily as a training aircraft with 59 and 56 OTUs, and was rebuilt a further three times following major accidents, including hitting a lorry on the runway and being stuffed into a snowbank!

 

In December 1943, R4118 was crated at Cardiff and shipped to India as a training aircraft. However it was never needed and remained in its packing case in Bombay until 1947 when it was struck off charge and donated to a university for engineering instruction. The fuselage was stood outside in a compound with the propeller, wings and tailplane laid on the ground. There it remained, exposed to the elements and ignored by the world, until 1996, when retired businessman and restoration enthusiast Peter Vacher began his remarkable quest to bring R4118 home. "

www.hurricaneheritage.com/about/

 

www.flyinglegends.com/aircraft/hawker-hurricane-mk1-r4118...

 

“Suppose this is it…” I said as I looked at the address written on the small slip of paper Fluxx had given me ages ago. I then gazed upward at what looked to be a decently sized facility with “Flickr Fighters” printed on a sign above the entrance.

 

“Must be a typo…”

 

Shaking off the peculiar wordage I marched inside to find surprisingly few of my colleagues. Hardly any of which I recognized.

This could prove difficult…

 

“You alright there Count?” A slightly modulated voice spoke behind me.

 

I quickly whipped around to find a figure clad in silver and purple power armor with a cape similar to my own. I recognized them from the Halloween incident but like most instances, I could not remember their name.

 

“Ah, Hello there. By chance do you have any idea where we keep the archives?”

 

“Try the office next to the meeting room.”

“Which is where exactly?”

 

“Just follow me…” the figure said with a sigh as he marched through the lobby and down the hall.

 

We reached the office and they walked over to the filing cabinet and attempted to open it only to discover it was locked.

 

“Allow me.” I said calmly as I pulled out a couple of bobby pins from my pocket. And began picking the lock.

 

“Why don’t you just carry lock picks?” They asked likely wondering why a gentleman had hairpins on his person.

 

“Lock picks always raise suspicion… Not to mention I never could get the hang of them…”

 

With that, a satisfying “click” sounded as I positioned the last pin and opened the drawer.

 

“Let’s see… ah, here we are.”

 

I pulled out a large folder filled with sheets of paper containing a photo of each member along with their name, powers, and a summary of their background.

 

“What is it you’re looking for anyway?”

 

“I’m looking for heroes with portal generation abilities…” I answered as I flipped through the papers.

 

“You mean like this?”

 

With a flick of the wrist, the hero summoned a small purple rift in space-time about the size of a pie pan.

Then something clicked in my cluttered mind and I remembered that the hero in front of me went by the name Rift Runner.

 

“Well. I feel like an idio-“

 

Suddenly a fellow in a black tactical suit wearing a bandana over his mouth entered the office.

 

“What’s going on here?!” Agent Sharp exclaimed.

 

“Oh bother, time to go!” I said quickly grabbing Rift runner’s shoulder and shifting to a random dimension.

 

“Youch! Watch it man, that hasn’t fully healed- What the?! Where the heck are we?!” Rift shouted as he looked around clearly startled by our sudden change in location.

 

I looked around and saw we stood in a room with yellow wallpaper covered in mildew stains, slightly damp foul-smelling carpet and Fluorescent lights that buzzed loudly overhead.

 

“It appears we have ended up in the realm known only as the backrooms.” I replied as I pocketed the folder.

 

“Backrooms? Sounds like one of those crazy stories you find online…”

 

“Well my friend, the multiverse is often a very odd thing. Sometimes one realm’s crazy story is another’s reality… Now, if we just stay put we should return to the realm we came from shortly.”

 

“Can’t you just shift us back?”

 

“One does not enter or exit this realm on purpose. Only by accident. If I were to shift now we’d end up in one of the more treacherous levels of this office building of the damned…”

 

Suddenly a loud howl echoed through the halls causing Fluffenstein to leap out of my pocket and dash off down the hall.

 

“Oh bugger! Come on! And try to keep up, this place will drive you mad if we get separated!” exclaimed as I pulled out my cutlass and a bottle of almond water before we ran through the endless halls after the cat.

 

As we searched I explained the Apophis Ra situation to Rift in order to try and maintain our sanity.

 

“So what does this guy have to do with me?” Rift asked.

 

“Well, I honestly have no idea what Apophis is capable of. Thus I devised a backup plan utilizing portals just in case- There!”

 

I pointed as a white blur dashed towards us and clung to the leg of my trousers.

 

“Easy there mate. You’re safe now.” I said consoling the frightened feline as I picked him up and gently placed him in my coat. Buttoning it to ensure he stayed put.

 

“I wouldn’t be so sure Count…” Rift said pointing to a pair of shadowy creatures in the distance slowly approaching us.

 

“Hounds…” I whispered as I passed Rift the bottle of almond water. “Here, start backing up slowly and If they turn hostile douse them with this.”

 

Rift nodded and we began to walk backwards. The creatures slowly picking up speed and their appearance becoming clearer as they got closer. Revealing not the canine shape they had at a distance but that of distorted and tangled humanoids walking on all fours with unnatural movements. With a loud snarl, the creatures began rapidly scuttling towards us. I quickly raised my sword and prepared to strike the beast in front as it lunged towards me when suddenly a pair of purple vortexes opened in front of the first creature and above the other as the first tumbled in and sank its claws into the other’s back causing a fight to break out between them. I turned to my companion to see he had his hand raised and was breathing heavy as though he had just had quite a workout.

 

“Quick Mate, the water!” I exclaimed.

 

Rift tossed me the bottle and I ripped off the cap frantically before splashing the liquid onto the beasts causing them to scream in pain as it burned their shadowy hide.

 

I then began shouting and swinging my sword as I walked towards them and the creatures scrambled back down the hall they came from.

 

“Haha! That’s it ya yella bellied beasties! Run back to the void where ya belong!” I shouted as I pocketed my weapon and turned back to my companion.

 

“Exceptional work my friend!” I said as I went to pat Rift on the shoulder but caught myself before I made the mistake.

 

“What even were those things?!”

 

“Most refer to them as the Hounds of Tindalos after one of Lovecraft’s abominations.” I explained. “Now then, what say we find a way out of this wretched place before Cuthulhu shows up…”

 

“Should I take that last statement a joke or an actual concern?”

 

“Best to take it as both mate…” I replied with a laugh. “Best to take it as both.”

 

After a bit more walking we turned a corner to find the hallway opened into a desert landscape filled with mesquite bushes and cacti.

 

“Ah, an exit!” I stated as we walked into the “room” only for the hallway to vanish once we turned around.

 

“Now. Let’s find out where we are…” I said as I began pulling out my navigational equipment. Compass, spyglass, sextant and the like.

 

“Hold on Capt Sparrow.” Rift said likely referencing something. “Let me handle this.”

 

Rift then pulled out a smartphone and opened up some sort of map on it.

 

“Looks like we’re just outside Laredo. Just a quick jump and we’ll be back in Advent City.”

 

Rift opened a portal under our feet and we disappeared through it and landed in the lounge room of the Flickr Fighters Headquarters. Rift landing on a chair while I crashed backwards into the coffee table.

 

“Sorry about that Count. I’m used to traveling alone.”

 

“That’s understandable. Most Vampire hunters choose to be lone wolves…” I said as I picked myself up and let the cat out of my coat before I sat down on the couch.

 

“Vampire hunter? What are you talking about?”

 

“Your cape, it’s a trophy from a vampire hunt correct?” I asked. “Got mine after a fight with Dracula last centur- er, a few years ago.”

 

Rift shook his head.

 

“I Just thought the cape looked cool and the guys back at HQ whipped this one up for me.” Rift explained. “It helps with gliding and deflects heat and ice rays.”

 

I couldn’t help but chuckle a bit at Rift’s description.

 

“Fancy. But I’ll stick with being able to say I pulled mine out of the dust pile that was once a legendary strigoi.”

 

Just then our discussion was interrupted by the lights flickering out and then on again to reveal the sudden and dramatic arrival of agent sharp.

 

“The folder. Hand it over.” He said sternly.

 

I sighed as I pulled out the file and tossed it onto the coffee table. (Which was now cracked down the center and was being held up by only three legs.)

 

“Anything else officer?” I asked mocking Sharp’s serious tone.

 

“Yes. You’ve yet to show up at any of the group training sessions or any of the meetings…”

 

“In my defense, I wasn’t aware either of those were things.”

 

“I figured as much.” Sharp said shifting to a somewhat softer tone as he picked up the file. “According to Fluxx you only knew about Gravestein last Thursday because he happened to say something to you.”

 

“Hey, I was at the warehouse wasn’t I? What’s the big deal?”

 

“The point I’m getting at is the Flickr fighters rely upon communication between heroes. And we can’t function properly if one of them doesn’t even have a phone.”

 

“I’ll have you know I have two excellent telephones.” I said pulling one out of my pocket. “Why this one even has one of those newfangled rotary dial setups.”

 

“Man, I didn’t know they still made these…” Rift said as he picked up one of my phones and fiddled with the dial. “And how exactly are we supposed to send you messages on these?”

 

“Well, I figured we could set up a party line. Telephones still have that right?”

 

“No Count, they do not.” Sharp said with a sigh. “Look, you have access to a multiverse full of tech. Just find a smartphone you like and then get someone more technologically inclined to connect it to HQ’s network for you.”

 

“Not to mention you’ll have access to the group files and don’t have to raid the office.” Rift said passing the phone back to me.

 

As I stuck the phone into my pocket I noticed a sneaky look in Sharp’s eyes as a smirk came across his face.

 

“Which reminds me, which of you left a hairpin jammed into the lock on the cabinet?”

 

“He did it.” Rift said quickly slipping through a portal before I had a chance to pull him down with me.

 

“Well. I believe some extra time in the training room will be suitable consequences. I’ll see you at 0500 tomorrow morning for your first session.”

 

Sharp then exited the room and once he was a good distance away Rift appeared through a portal and landed back in his seat.

 

“Sorry man, I survived one training session with him, I don’t know if I’d last through another.”

 

“Quite alright ol’ chap. But you better not let me down tonight.”

 

“No prob. I’ll meet you at the museum ’round eleven. This should be interesting…”

 

That evening…

I walked around the museum half shifted to avoid detection. Looking at the exhibits to pass the time as I waited for either Rift or Apophis to arrive.

 

I couldn’t help but notice the differences in this dimension’s history I wasn’t aware of. The Sphinx not having a nose, three pyramids at Giza instead of four. But oddest exhibit of all was in the American history exhibit. A playbill from the Ford theatre’s production of “Our American Cousin.” Perhaps this realm’s version of the event went differently than I had learned. If Lincoln hadn’t bent down to retrieve his wife’s handkerchief Booth’s scheme could have easily succeeded.

 

“Excuse me, sir.” The night guard said rounding the corner and walking towards me. “I’m gonna have to ask you to le- GAH!”

 

The guard screamed and frantically drew his weapon as he saw the beam of his flashlight hit the wall behind me.

 

“Ah, Sorry my good fellow.” I said shifting back to where I was no longer translucent and held up my ITF badge. I’m an agent from the Interdimensional Task Force. I’m here to investigate a potential robbery.”

 

“Interdimensonal? Look, kid, I have no idea what the heck you are or what you’re doin’ here and I honestly don’t care. Now come along-“

 

Suddenly a portal opened under the guard and he disappeared through it.

 

“Gotten in trouble with the cops already?.” Rift said as he walked up behind me.

 

“So it would seem… The ITF must not be very well known in this realm.”

 

I then noticed rift was holding a cloth knapsack and something in it was moving.

 

“um, what’s in the bag?”

 

“your cat.” Rift said shoving the bag in my face. “you left them at HQ. Thought you might need them for whatever plan you have.”

 

I hadn’t thought of that… If Apophis’ is fascinated with the Egyptian religion then Fluffenstein could be a valuable weapon.

 

Genius idea mate! Just like The Battle of Pelusium!”

 

“The what?”

 

“During the first Persian conquest of Egypt, Cambyses II’s troops painted cat faces on their shields and placed dogs, sheep, cats, ibises and whatever other animals the Egyptians held sacred onto the front lines. Thus, the Egyptians surrendered at once instead of facing the ‘cat army.'”

 

“Huh, neat… But last time I checked two guys and a cat aren’t an army…”

 

“What we need is not an army, but a lookout.” I answered. “Follow me into the Egyptian exhibit.

 

We walked down the hall a ways until we came to a room filled with ancient Egyptian artifacts. Or rather, what the people of this dimension assume to be Egyptian.

 

“See that camera up there?” I said gesturing to the security device above us in the corner of the room.

 

“Lemme guess. you want me to head up to the security room and keep an eye on the cameras while you wait here for Apophis”

 

“You catch on quickly my friend.” I said with a grin. “When he gets here focus on the Egyptian exhibit’s camera and whenever you see me tip my hat open a rift under Apophis into that sarcophagus over there.”

 

“You got it Count.”

 

Rift gave me a quick salute before opening a rift behind him and disappearing through it.

 

“Well Fluffenstein.” I said pulling the kitten from the bag. “I hope that Antiquitus has the same superstitions as Third Dynasty Egypt.”

 

Around thirty minutes had passed and I had shifted in an armchair from my lair and was beginning to doze off in it whilst stroking Fluffenstein. Something about petting a small furry creature always puts one’s mind at ease.

 

Suddenly the lights in the room turned on and then began flickering rhythmically as an electronic noise began echoing around me.

 

I quickly stood up and shifted the chair away to my lair and tucked Fluffenstein behind my back under my cape.

 

Wait a minute, that noise, is that, music?

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-Cbb0AyhBU

 

Suddenly a cloud of blue smoke appeared and Apophis Ra stepped through it holding an ankh staff in one hand and a strange obsidian tablet in the other.

 

“Friends, Romans, countrymen…” The Cultist said in a semi-robotic voice. “Apophis Ra here coming at you live with a crossover I have been waiting dynasties to make! Here he is, the menace of the multiverse, Bane of Anubis, Count Dimensio!”

 

“Bane of Anubis? That’s a new one…” I joked trying to mask my confusion as Apophis held the tablet up towards me.

 

“Oh yeah, my dude! That ol’ doggo is ticked with you. What with your tomb raiding and all. Right folks?”

 

“Who the devil are you talking to?!”

I exclaimed in frustration as I scanned the room. “What manner of multidimensional demons have you brought here?”

 

“Chill, I’m just vloggin dude, Gotta keep them followers posted on my conquest of the multiverse.”

 

“Well, I’m afraid your cult’s quest ends here…” I said drawing my sword.

 

“I wouldn’t be so sure…” Apophis replied as he set his device on top of a nearby crate and held up his staff with both hands. “BEHOLD THE POWER OF APOPHIS RA!”

 

As he tapped the end of his staff on the floor a loud hissing erupted from the walls and hundreds of vipers began pouring out of the cracks and formed a defensive ring around their master.

“Impressive eh? Go ahead my man, try and strike me!” Apophis taunted

“With pleasure…” I said tipping my hat.

 

On cue, a rift opened under Apophis and he fell into the sealed sarcophagus in the corner.

Before a larger rift opened and the vipers fell into it.

 

“Well, that was easy.” Rift said as he appeared beside me.

 

“Indeed, I didn’t even have to use the-“

 

Suddenly I was cut off by the sound of a laser blast and the lid of the sarcophagus shattering and flying across the room.

 

“HEY! Not cool dude!” Apophis shouted as he lept out of the casket. “You totally messed up the vibe I had going!”

 

“Never mind…” I said with a sigh as I dodged a blast from the arch of Apophis’ staff.

 

“Did he just say vibe? I thought you said he was a Cultist.” Rift asked as we ducked behind a display case whilst Apophis was firing his staff and swinging it around like a maniac whilst doing some kind of strange dance. “He looks more like one of those annoying internet celebrities…”

 

“I’m certain, he even has a magic tablet that he uses to keep his followers updated on the fight.”

 

“Tablet huh. Where?”

 

I pointed out the strange device to Rift and he opened a portal under it causing it to fall right into his hands.

 

“Uh, Count? this is just a smartphone.” Rift explained looking the device over. “albeit a rather strange looking one. I mean it looks like he’s live-streaming the fight on some kind of youtube style site but the text is all in caps and some kind of weird language.”

 

“All in capitals? Hand me that…”

 

I took the phone and sure enough, it was filming us right that moment and many different people were posting messages beside the video in what appeared to be Latin. Or at least a variant of it.

 

“Hmm, I believe you’re right… it does appear to be an internet-like system..”

 

“Hey, I have an idea.” RIft whispered. “If his internet is anything like ours I know something that just might give us an advantage.”

 

“Hey! You fellas comin’ out or am I gonna have to disappoint all my followers?” Apophis asked mockingly before smiling towards where his phone had been and noticing it wasn’t there.

 

“What the- WHO STOLE MY EYE-PHONE?”

 

“You mean this?” I taunted as I shifted through the display and walked into the center of the room. “Sorry ‘dude’ but I just had a talk with your followers they think this fight is missing something.”

 

“Oh yeah? And what do my loyal legion of fans what to see?”

 

“BEHOLD! THE SLAYER OF RODENTS, DESTROYER OF HOUSEPLANTS! FLUFFENSTEIN!!!” I exclaimed pulling the cat out and holding him in view of the phone’s camera.

 

“GAH! GET THAT BASTET SPAWN AWAY FROM ME!!” Apophis screamed as he stumbled backward.

 

“Well now, An Egyptian who’s afraid of cats? Now I’ve seen everything…” I said with a laugh.

 

“I’m n-not afraid of th-them I’m just Aler- aah, Aah, ACHOO!!”

 

Apophis then entered a sneezing fit and dropped his staff in the process. which rift quickly snatched up with a portal.

 

“Allergic?” Rift said with an obvious chuckle in his voice he was trying to hide.

 

“Yeah…” Apophis answered with a sniffle, reaching for his staff and fumbling around with watery eyes.

 

“Well, It appears we have the upper-hand here Apophis… Perhaps you better come along peacefully before we have to take you to a hospital…”

 

“Sure man, ACHOO! J-just get that thing away from me…”

 

a short while later we had Apophis in cuffs and we had just finished dropping off Fluffenstein at my lair with Jack.

 

“Right, So I assume you’ll take it from here?” Rift asked.

 

“I can, but I’d prefer if I had someone else with me. helps keep the cops from getting suspicious if I have a hero with me…”

 

“But I thought you work for some top-secret Men in black style organization?”

 

Men In Black? Good heavens no. It’s just the inter-dimensional police. Not the CIA. Now come on…”

 

I grabbed Rift and Apophis’ shoulders and shifted into the large front lobby of the police station.

 

marble pillars lining the walls, royal blue carpeting, and a large wooden desk in the center.

 

“Well look what we got here.” The red-haired woman at the desk stated. “Chief said you’d be comin’ in with a convict but I didn’t expect you to bring in two.”

 

“Uh, No Miss Lana. This is Rift Runner, He’s part of the hero team I joined.”

 

Lana raised an eyebrow suspiciously as she looked Rift over.

 

“If you say so sugar. leave Apophis with Charlie and then head on back to the chief’s office. I’ll let her know Y’all are here…”

 

“Thank you, ma’am. Come on Rift.”

 

I walked towards what must have seemed like a wall to Rift and apophis until we stepped through it and into the prisoner processing center.

 

“So this is where you guys lock up the crooks?” Rift asked.

 

“No, this is just where we throw the book at em, and that fellow over there is our head book thrower. How’s it going, Charlie?”

 

The tall gawky looking man jolted up in his seat and straightened his uniform only to sigh once he turned his desk chair around to find me.

 

“Oh, It’s just you. I thought it was somebody important.” Charlie said with a yawn. “Just stick the perp in cell seven while I work out the papers…”

 

“Cell seven? Well now, You’re a lucky man Apophis.” I joked. “You get to stay in my old room.”

 

Apophis merely rolled his eyes as rift shoved him down the hall and into the cell with a seven above it.

 

“Right, You have a good evening Charlie, I’ll fill out any paperwork later. Gotta go see chief.”

 

“HEY! you still haven’t turned those papers from-“

 

I quickly grabbed Rift and shifted to the Cheif’s office door before Charlie could finish.

 

“Sorry about that Rift, I can’t stand paperwork…”

 

“Tell me about it. you wouldn’t believe how many reports Sharp has us fill out when we capture a villain…”

 

“You’re preaching to the choir mate. Preaching to the choir…”I said with a grin as I knocked on the door.

 

“Enter…” The Chief replied from inside.

 

I opened the door to see Chief Cahill standing at the window behind her desk. gazing out at the futuristic skyline of Capitus Prime.

 

“Beautiful isn’t it?” Chief asked as she turned around and sat down at her desk and turned on the banker’s lamp that sat on it.

 

“I always prefered the look of Capitus Delta.” I replied.

 

“Of course you would. Have a seat Jones, You too Monteleone.”

 

“HOW DID YOU KNOW-“

 

“Your Name? Oh relax, I know more about you flickr fighters than Sharp! why else would I have sent Jones here to Advent city to serve his parole.”

 

“Well, just don’t tell anybody alright? I prefer to keep my secret identity.”

 

“Of course, My lips are sealed…” Chief replied with a locking motion over her lips. “Now then, tell me everything that happened…”

The official caption states: “Western Front. August 1918. German Army troops man handling guns into position”

 

This is most probably a photo of Bavarian Infanteriegeschützebatterie (Infantry Gun Battery) No. 2 taken at a training area, possibly near Rethel, France. Note the British Mk. IV and a French Snider tank in the background.

 

A typical Infantry Gun Battery consisted of 4 guns with a 6 man crew per gun which is the case here (the fourth gun is probably to the left, out of frame. Note the two shadows on the ground). Such units were formed on a divisional level and accompanied infantry for the duration of one operation. The unit would take position on the flanks of the second wave of infantry shock troops and would advance 1000 yards after the first assault wave. Guns would move in two-gun detachments, so that the two other pieces of artillery were always at the ready. The aim was to take out enemy strongholds at close range.

 

The guns have been identified as 7,7 cm Infanterie-Geschütz 18, a late-war model that never saw action and of which very few photos exist. There’s a camouflaged crate on top of each the guns which gives the illusion of an odd shaped shield.

 

Also of interest are the camouflaged helmets which seem to be painted unevenly with one single colour over the standard feldgrau. Discernible on some of the helmets is an unidentified crest.

 

I was unable to identify the binoculars the officer has.

 

Text compiled from a discussion concerning a copy of this photo owned by S. Wouters.

 

Original: German War Museum (Bufa 11796) via AWM

So, this is our new baby. She is a rescue from "Shelter on the Hill", Lebec, CA.

Miss Minnie is 27 wks old, 7.5 lbs., blond who loves long walks, mid-morning, mid-afternoon naps and having a family of her own. We have been trying to teach how to play and were thrilled that she grabbed her new toy and tried beat it up on the carpet.

We are firm believers in doggie doors & crate training. With that said, she now sleeps with the granddaughter all night. lol

 

Wish I had Jody Trappe's (dog ma) skill at doggie portraits. Check out her amazing work here on Flickr. www.flickr.com/photos/jodysphotography

14th June 2015 - Hawker Hurricane MkI 'R4118' taxi's in to the RAF Cosford airshow.

  

Hawker Hurricane Mark I, R4118, was delivered new to 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron at Drem on 17 August 1940. During the Battle of Britain it flew 49 sorties from Croydon and shot down five enemy aircraft. After being battle damaged on 22 October 1940, the aircraft was rebuilt and taken on charge by 111 Squadron at Dyce on 18 January 1941. There it was flown on patrol over the North Sea and was again in combat. Over the following two years it was used primarily as a training aircraft with 59 and 56 OTUs, and was rebuilt a further three times following major accidents, including hitting a lorry on the runway and being stuffed into a snowbank!

 

In December 1943, R4118 was crated at Cardiff and shipped to India as a training aircraft. However it was never needed and remained in its packing case in Bombay until 1947 when it was struck off charge. It was donated to a university for engineering instruction. The fuselage was stood outside in a compound with the propeller, wings and tailplane laid on the ground. There it remained until June 2001 when Peter Vacher was able to conclude six-year-long negotiations and R4118 was loaded into a container. The aircraft has been restored to flying condition over the past three years.

 

During its lifetime, it was fitted with no fewer than five Rolls-Royce Merlin III engines, and underwent four major rebuilds. It is still powered by a Merlin III (the only other aircraft in the world to retain a Merlin III is the Sea Hurricane at Shuttleworth). It is said to be the most historic fighter aircraft to have survived the war.

 

Meticulous restoration was undertaken by Hawker Restorations Ltd in Suffolk. This included fitting every piece of equipment which was in the aircraft during the Battle, such as the first of the VHF radios (the TR1133), the Identification Friend or Foe unit, the original 8 Browning machine guns, and the camera gun in the starboard wing.

 

Wing Commander Bob Foster, who shot down three enemy aircraft from R4118 during the Battle, is the current Chairman of the Battle of Britain Fighter Association.

This is for the Rainbow week group and the color for Saturday is VIOLET (aka Purple).

 

Purple rose up to his full height. He was very tall and spoke with great pomp: "I am the color of royalty and power. Kings, chiefs, and bishops have always chosen me for I am the sign of authority and wisdom. People do not question me - they listen and obey."

 

Lavender/Vanilla Fabric Softener is the best smelling!!!

 

Gold at the End of the rainbow? The only gold at the end of my rainbow is the gold crate for the "yellows" or brights in my laundry.

 

I AM ROYALITY!! I rule over the laundry :) A long time ago I bought colored crates for my laundry... Red Clothes go in the Red crate, Blues in the Blue crate, Darks in the Black Crate, Whites in the White Crate... etc. Makes washing and sorting easier as well as training the boys how to wash clothes... yeah that is really working right now ;-) So much for Listen and Obey

 

Explore Highest position: 293 on Monday, June 11, 2007

One of the few dogs who genuinely enjoys being in the crate enough that we have to leave it open 24/7.

Army has been doing well. :) He is catching onto house training and already knows how to sit and lie down, using sign language of course. He also sleeps in my bed, because he throws a fit in his crate. He loves the other dogs! He's not a bit scared of them, even giant Legend. He gets very vocal when he doesn't get his way. >_> But that's alright. He is a TOTAL people lover, he's constantly got to be by someone. He needs more socialization with dogs though, because he's gotten a little aggressive with our other dogs a few times when they play too rough with him.

Available at ROMP 1.15.17!

 

It's a new year, why not explore new kinky things? Or, return refreshed to old ones!

 

The Puppy Crate has 24 different textures to choose from, and is RLV enabled.

It was built for M/f D/s relationships.

 

Animation Breakdown:

 

Solo:

6 Female Submissive Solo animations

10 Dominant Solo animations (5 Male, 5 Female)

6 M/f Pet Training animations

32 Adult Sexual Animations broken into 5 rp scenes

5 Aftercare and cuddle animations

 

Custom props included

 

If the event is too laggy, you can demo at the main store!

So...my boss really shocked the hell out of me today. He surprised me by paying off the remaining balance of my bike lay away as a reward for doing such a great job! Star and I picked it up after work and he had the guys there attach a note that read:

 

Thank you for your extraordinary effort and for the incredible contribution you make toward the success of the company.

 

Congrats on your new healthy lifestyle

 

- Stu

 

I'm still amazed and can't believe he did this for me! Needless to say I'm really stoked to start riding this every day to work instead of my car and the $3.40 a gallon gas prices, not to mention the health benefits which is the main purpose.

 

I really have to crack down on Motley to complete his crate training so I can avoid bringing him into work with me since I won't be able to.

 

Stoked!!!

"They say that each inquisitor is a specialist in a unique field, and this is why we carry such unique weaponry," Sir Oswald intoned, guiding a group of young recruits into the Ministry of Artifice, the armory of the Inquisition.

"The truth of the matter is that it is the weaponry we carry that forges us each into our specialized field."

Oswald spun on his heel, facing the recruits quite suddenly.

"You each have served the minimal mandated enlistment. You have been trained in the use of general armaments, you know how each stock is crafted from sanctified wood in order to grant us the piercing accuracy of truth, and scouring might of light, in battle."

Oswald gestured for the nearest young man to un-sling his rifle.

"Yet the uniformity created by mass production, and required by mass training, diminishes these holy properties. No amount of rune engraving can compensate for what is lost in this process," Oswald grimaced, disdainfully flinging the rifle into an empty crate. "For truly superior weaponry, the craftsman must allow the form of the wood to guide him. This is why each Inquisitor bears a unique weapon. Mastering the form that nature sees fit to grant him is the first step to becoming a holy warrior against the darkness."

Brandishing his own weapon aloft, Inquisitor Oswald gestured to the crate, and the full weapon rack beside it.

"If you would become Inquisitors, and simple men no longer, cast your rifle into the crate and select your new weapon from the rack. Choose wisely, because the tool you choose will in kind decide the role destined to you."

 

(Comments and notes are appreciated)

Umm, yes, I'd say Flynn is *fairly* enthusiastic when it comes to catching balls! Unfortunately, this week, the ball wasn't the only thing Flynnie latched on to... Wednesday saw Return of The Bitey Dog. I was putting his harness on, when he tensed up & gave me *the look* - which spells trouble. I backed off immediately, to give him some space but Flynn was too wound up - he lunged & bit me, once, on the arm.

 

It's always a very unpleasant shock to be bitten but I was happy that Flynn stopped after a single bite (he used to become completely frantic & would bite multiple times) & that he responded when I spoke to him, asking him to go to his crate, which is his "safe place". He also calmed back down rapidly, instead of remaining tense for a long period afterwards.

 

I hoped Wednesday's incident would be a one-off but the next day, while Flynn didn't actually bite he went all snappy & snarly again, when I went to put the harness on. I suspect I triggered this reaction by being somewhat... overly tentative - remembering what had happened the day before!! We've taken things steady the rest of this week & made some compromises to avoid any further issues, or upsets - for either of us. Hopefully next week, things will get back to normal.

 

Dealing with a dog like Flynn, training is obviously a long term thing - it's upsetting when it happens, but there are going to be set-backs! This time last year, I was getting bitten probably weekly - this Wed was the first time Flynn has bitten or shown any aggression really, in more than 3 months, so on the whole I think we're doing pretty well ;-) Life is certainly never boring with this pup around!!

Royal Navy International Air Day 2019.

Owned by the Royal Navy Historic Flight / Naval Aviation Ltd.

The following is from the Navy Wings website.

It was allocated civil registration G-BMGC on 23Oct85 but it was cancelled on 02Sep91.

 

W5856 is the oldest surviving Fairey Swordfish in the world. She first flew on Trafalgar Day (21 October) 1941 and was a “Blackfish”, built by Blackburn Aircraft at Sherburn-in-Elmet and delivered to 82 MU (Lichfield) on 20 October 1941 for overseas transport to Gibraltar. W5856 served with the Royal Navy’s Mediterranean Fleet for a year. Little is known of her role while on active Service in the Mediterranean but it is likely W5856 was based at North Front, Gibraltar, carrying out patrols over the Straits. She was then returned to Fairey’s Stockport factory for refurbishment during winter 1942/43.

Used for advanced flying training and trials, W5856 was transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy in 1944 and again used in a training role, then stored in reserve after the War’s end. Passing through the hands of at least two civilian operators after disposal, she was purchased by Sir William Roberts and brought to Scotland to join his Strathallan Collection, arriving in crates in August 1977 in a badly corroded condition.

In 1990, the aircraft was bought by British Aerospace and completely restored to flying condition. Following a successful test flight at Brough in May 1993 she was gifted to the Royal Navy Historic Flight and three years later was adopted by the City of Leeds, in tribute to the local companies that built Swordfish components during World War II. She now wears the City’s coat of arms and name on her port side just forward of the pilot’s cockpit.

W5856 was grounded with corrosion in her wing spars in 2003 and her future looked uncertain. However with great generosity BAE Systems stepped in and constructed a new set of wings which were delivered to the Royal Navy Historic Flight in 2012. W5856 was finally restored to full flying condition and saved for the nation by a major grant from the Peter Harrison Heritage Foundation. The aircraft re-joined the display circuit in 2015, carrying a new paint scheme which depicts Swordfish of 820 Naval Air Squadron during the attack of the Bismarck in 1941.

Toby, where's Henry?!

 

Daily Dog Challenge 3005. "Magical"

 

It's Harry Potter Book Night? Who knew!

 

120 Pictures in 2020 - #18. Burgundy

 

Our Daily Challenge - Feb 7, 2020: "Theater"

 

Magic? Props?? Costumes???

 

Work with me here!

 

100x in 2020: #13

 

Um... no. I didn't plan on Toby's eyes being closed.

 

But I do think it's funny. :)

 

On Toby Training front - look how nicely he's sitting next to the crate - which is what is under the black fabric.

 

What a good boy!

 

And no, I didn't try adding the wizard cloak (see Henry's version).

 

I actually think he would have been fine wearing it, but it's a royal pain trying to keep the ruff UNDER the cloak but the tie OVER the cloak, and Toby would have started to fidget.

 

And we are trying to keep posing happy and fun!

 

Stop on by Henry and Toby's blog: bzdogs.com - The Secret Life of the Suburban Dog

"My family went on vacation and I went to a home where I boarded with a couple who do dog training. They loved me, said I was one of the best dogs they'd ever had, blah, blah, blah, but it wasn't home and they weren't my people. They actually expected me to sleep in a crate! Like a dog!

 

So coming home was pure joy. My cry bone and my second favorite, the green Kong, weren't with me because Mom was afraid they'd get lost. I had other toys but was so happy to see these two again that I cried and cried, pounced on them, rolled on the floor with them between my paws, and leaped in the air tossing them around the living room. You can see I'm going to keep them close from now on.

 

Having Mom pick me up was beyond happy. I bounced all over the room and tried to pull her outside so we could go home. This was the first vacation where I couldn't go too and I'm going to try to see that it doesn't happen again! Ever!!"

 

"(P.S. I would have posted this last weekend but Doug, my human brother, loaded 818 of his photos on this computer and then took the USB camera cable home with him! Supposedly an accident but I suspect sibling rivalry came into it too.)" signed, Benni

21/52

 

D-day +3 (0800hrs.)

Private Cole Douglas

1st Canadian Parachute Battalion

June 9th, 1944.

 

We jumped on the early morning of June 6th around 0100hrs. It was a brisk morning, and briefly reminded me of home. It was like that calm midnight breeze that you get on perfect nights in the early spring. But, it was not a perfect night by any means. My platoon had a somewhat different objective than the others. We were to search towns for German command: Mostly officers and any troops that had information relating to their defensive positions.

 

We ransacked a small house in a town which I forget the name of. It was very dark, and hard to see. I don’t remember what the exterior of the house looked like, but I remember what happened once I got inside. I was first up, and rushed inside; then the others followed. A German officer surprised me from behind the door, and punched me in the throat, but it hit my collar more than anything. My rifle flew away from me. I panicked and tried to yell, but couldn’t. In an instant, the German tackled me to the ground. I saw the look in the officer’s eyes as he was on top of me. It was so icy; it chills me to think about it now. He intended to strangle me, I know it.

 

I reached for my knife, but it was nowhere to be found. I would only see it after the struggle. It was more than four feet from me. It had come loose somehow. In order to save myself, I hit him in the stomach several times, until he regressed. But my fight was not over. I knew I had to act quickly. My paratrooper training kicked in and I turned into a monster. I pulled a grenade from my belt, but my intention was not to pull the pin. I wrapped my reddened hand around it tightly, and swung like I had never swung before. I bellowed a savage battle cry as I bashed the side of his head more than six times with that rigid stone of iron. When the life finally left his body, I dropped the grenade and crawled back.

 

My friends had finished fighting the other Germans in the room only a few seconds earlier. Just enough time to watch me commit that horrible crime. His bloodied corps just lay on the ground, motionless. I leaned against the wall, and began to cry. I cried for a long time, five minutes I think, until Thomas gently gripped me by the arm and helped me up. He handed me my rifle and the Walther PPK from the officer that I had just ended. Then, we left the house.

 

That was the first time I killed a man. That sight will haunt me for the rest of my days, I know it. I will never forget his icy glance, the blood on the floor, and on my hands.

 

That was on the first day. The next day, Robert was on point, when a crew of German troops opened fire on us. The brrrp-brrp of the MG42 rang out as I dove behind a crate. My rifle once again would be no use in this situation. I only had a few seconds to act, so I reached for my knife, and that PPK pistol. I rose up, and charged at the German troops. I killed one from a distance of five meters with the pistol, and tackled the other. I proceeded to stab him with the knife, pushing it deep in between his ribs.

 

We took that German position. They had surprised us, bet we ended up on top. My friends now call me the berserker. A nickname I don’t particularly like. I would much prefer my real name: Cole. I hope this war will end as soon as the radio reporters predict, but I suppose it does not matter. My soul is already damned. I was dammed the minute I walked through the door of that quaint French farmhouse. I pray to be forgiven, but I don’t know if that will ever happen…

 

sorry for such a long story guys, but its fun to write!

 

//Lieutenant Raven's Log

 

//ENTER//

 

 

It almost feels wrong to be back in the field. Myself and my brothers in Blackbird have been training with Cuy'val Dar for so long, I almost forgot what a real combat scenario feels like. There's an exhilaration in it that no simulation can really replicate.

 

There's also a danger no simulation can really replicate.

 

Thank whatever the Force is that we in Blackbird are more than prepared for that.

 

Aerial insertion. Secure a station. Didn't see too much complication in it, and I was right not to. I did take issue with the Legion-mandated plan of action, though. We were supposed to land in a commandeered Separatist shuttle, then storm out onto the landing pad, blasters alight. Fierfek, I wasn't thrilled with that. Command doesn't have the same bead on a situation that boots on the ground do. So I made a call. 66 kept the shuttle approaching the landing pad, exchanging codes with the Vandosian air control tower, while Fi, Rook, and I dropped out of the shuttle up in the clouds.

 

We've got aerial modules for a reason, right?

 

We dropped down under the station, and caught them as they were focused on 66 landing the Sheathipede. I came up under a precarious maintenance walkway, Rook flew up from under the landing pad itself, and Fi came around from the side.

 

The ambush went perfectly. That's my team. I knocked a Vandosian onto his back with my momentum and blasted him. Rook blasted one off the roof, and Fi caught one that was climbing up the ladder-conserving fuel, I assume. The Vandosian gave him a bit of a run-around--dodged the first attack--but Fi snuck his vibroknife through the rungs of the ladder and into the Vandosian's neck.

 

One more came out onto the pad from inside the station, but a blast from each of us made short work to him. Wasn't long after that that 66 landed the Sheathipede.

 

We moved some crates and set up a defensive position. Now was the difficult part: Holding the pad and keeping the Vandosians attention. Now everything came down to my brothers in the rest of the legion.

 

 

//Lieutenant Raven's Log

 

//END//

Today was "socializing" day. I took Echo to a sheep herding trial --she was handled and petted by dozens of strangers/ children. And she watched Border collies herd sheep.. Also, our neighbors stopped by to see her and she visited my dad and his dog Annie. She got a heavy dose of socialization.

 

No potty accidents today---i'm taking her outside A LOT to make sure she goes before she get's the urge to go inside.

 

She still squeals in the crate. But slept thru the night --last night.

 

Rusty is giving her the evil eye and keeping his distance. Keiko & June aren't as upset about her.

 

More in comments.

Bosco seriously injured his shoulder two weeks ago while training the send away (or go out/voraus) exercise. He's on crate rest for the next month which makes a high drive dog absolutely miserable. We were very worried since he didn't seem to be healing but this morning, he started putting weight on his front leg. Fingers crossed for a full recovery.

 

Bosco is only allowed outside for short breaks so I quickly snapped this photo. I didn't want to pose Bosco and risk putting stress on his injured shoulder. [This is also why I chose not to submit a photo for week 21.]

For 52 Weeks for Dogs -- 12/52

 

For the Daily Dog Challenge -- 3/23 "National Puppy Day"

 

Flattery has been really lonely since we lost Bunny. She wanted a new little sister and she got one. I think she liked the idea until the first night when Rosie howled all night in her crate. She actually came into the bedroom and slept with me some that night. So, since then, I've had this feeling that Flattery likes Rosie, but we've gone through the usual nose out of joint things that go along with adding a new dog to the mix. Flattery has done a fair amount of sulking. To add salt to her wound, my husband left for a long weekend of training with our GSD, Kuster, who is her buddy. Friday, I took Rosie for her first vet visit and we were gone for a couple of hours. When we got home, Flattery was very happy to see her back. They've spent a lot of time playing and hanging out together. I even checked in on the pet cam to see Flattery trying to console Rosie after I left the house today. She's really taking this big sister role seriously, even if it is totally exhausting. I couldn't even get her to look up at me for a picture, poor thing! I'm sure she'll be back up to her regular shenanigans soon!

 

You can read more about Flattery (and Rosie) at TalesAndTails.com.

Taiji Dolphin Captive Trade January 31 , 2014

 

Since when is captivity considered culture?

Taiji continues to profit from various species of dolphins being bought and sold to marine parks around the world. These dolphins are hand selected in the killing cove at the same time their remaining family is being slaughtered.

There are 3 captive brokers in Taiji: Hotel Dolphin Resort, Taiji Dolphin Training Base and Taiji Whale Museum and all three facilities hide their bloody business behind tarps. If this is truly tradition and culture, then why hide? — at Taiji Japan.

 

Sites for more information :

Sea Shepherd Cove Guardians Page (official)

www.facebook.com/SeaShepherdCoveGuardiansOfficialPage

 

Cove Guardians

www.seashepherd.org/cove-guardians

  

Photo: Sea Shepherd

 

This is part of my contribution to this year's Brick to the Past model, The Jacobite Risings: The Fight for Britain's Throne. To be fair this is a team effort with James Pegrum providing the landscape and me providing and setting up the armies. Simon Pickard also provided a load of troops.

 

While French support for the ‘Forty-five’ never met the hopes and expectations of the Scottish Jacobites, it nevertheless existed. Much of this was provided in the form of detachments from the Irish Brigade, which had originally been formed when five Jacobite regiments were sent from Ireland to France during the Williamite War in Ireland in exchange for a larger force of French infantry. The ‘Irish Picquets’, as they were known, saw action at the Battle of Falkirk and Culloden, and were valued for their training and discipline. Interestingly, the uniform of this unit were red, much like those of the government force, but designed and cut in the French style.

 

The Jacobite Risings: The Fight for Britain’s Throne is a LEGO model of a series of uprisings, rebellions and wars that occurred predominantly in Scotland, but also spread into Ireland and England, between 1689 and 1746. Following the deposition of James II of England and VII of Scotland in the Glorious Revolution, the aims of the risings were to return the Stuart monarch, and later his descendants, to the thrones of England and Scotland (and after 1707, the Kingdom of Great Britain). They take their name from Jacobus, the Latin form of James.

 

While conflict broke out in 1689, 1715, and 1719, the most famous rising is probably the last, that of 1745. During the “Forty-five" Charles Edward Stuart, also known as the Young Pretender or Bonnie Prince Charlie, led an army from the Scottish Highlands as far south as Derby before retreating north to be decisively defeated at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. Culloden was the last pitched battle to be fought on British soil and marked the end of any serious attempt to restore the house of Stuart to the throne.

 

The Jacobite Risings: The Fight for Britain’s Throne is a Brick to the Past creation built by Dan Harris, James Pegrum, Simon Pickard, Tim Goddard and Steve Snasdell. It was unveiled for the first time at the Bricktastic in July 2017 and went on display again at The Great Western Brick Show in October. It is now on display at Stirling Castle until February 2nd 2018.

 

You can see more photos on our website: www.bricktothepast.com/jacobite-risings

 

Brick to the Past specialise in crating massive, detailed and meticulously researched historically themed LEGO® models. You can follow us on:

 

www.facebook.com/bricktothepast

twitter.com/bricktothepast

www.bricktothepast.com

This is one of Layla's favorite stuffy toys. She has had him since she was a puppy and has taken very good care of him. Since Pip came along, he has been living in Layla's obedience bag and comes out as a reward when we are training or hangs out with her in her crate when we are at shows. Somehow Pip found him, and almost immediately chewed-off his ears and de-squeaked him.

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