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Fair Ave.

Can I get a smile?

I usually find a handful of these enormous caterpillars each year on various Willowherbs but today I found two wandering randomly nowhere near vegetation. This one was about 9cm long, velvety brown, with a horn at the rear end and two pairs of eyespots at the front. In America they call Hawk Moth caterpillars Horn Worms because of the spike at the rear. The original name of this moth was simply "The Elephant", but the name was for the caterpillar's resemblance to an Elephant's trunk, nothing to do with the adult moth. Though the resemblance is probably mimicking a small snake to deter bird predation. The scientific name is Deilephila elpenor, and I used to think that elpenor meant elephant. But Elpenor was a companion of Odysseus (Ulysses) who was turned into a pig by the sorceress Circe. When the head of this caterpillar retracts into the body it resembles a pig's snout. The related Small Elephant Hawk is called porcellus which means piglet, for the same reason. The generic name Deilephila means "evening loving" from the crepuscular habits (though most moths are crepuscular).

Can never understand where these things come from. They appear overnight, and grow amazingly fast.

The dreaded Horn Worm.

Well, this on was a cardinal's afternoon snack. Yum!

Lepidoptera : Sphingiidae

Referencia: bugguide.net/node/view/570

Encontre esta oruga en un arbol "borrachero"

ver siguiente definicion....

borrachero (Datura arborea y Datura sanguinea) m. Árbol o arbusto solanáceo de Sudamérica, de flores llamativas, alargadas, en forma de trompeta, blancas o rosadas; toda la planta es venenosa, rica en alcaloides y con propiedades narcóticas y alucinógenas.

Con razon esta oruga es de colores tan llamativos.

 

Esta especie tambien se encuentra en Estados Unidos...Florida.

Manufacturer: Lincoln Motor Company (division of Ford Motor Company after 1922), Dearborn, Michigan - U.S.A.

Type: Model KB Series 231 Model Number 237C Limousine

Engine: 7340cc V-12 65° L-head

Power: 150 bhp / 3.400 rpm

Speed: 155 km/h

Production time: 1932

Production outlet: 240

Curb weight: 2690 kg

 

Special:

- Founders Henry M. Leland (after leaving Cadillac) and Wilfred Leland named their cars after Abraham Lincoln, the first President of the U.S.A. from 1861 to 1865.

- Already after one year, they had to sell the company (post war recession / bankruptcy) to Henry Ford (at the urging of his son Edsel ☺☺) and Lincoln became Fords flagship.

- It has a three-speed selective sliding manual gearbox with integral free-wheeling, floor shifter, steering column levers, dual downdraft Stromberg carburettor, 9 3/4 inch double dry plate clutch, distributor and coil ignition system, and rear wheel drive.

- The chassis with aluminum body has a 145 inch wheelbase, single bar bumpers, large bowl-shaped head lights, a parking light on top of each front fender, dual trumpet horns, worm & roller steering, cloth interior, independent semi-elliptic leaf spring front and rear suspension, full floating type rear axle, spiral bevel differential, 18 inch wire wheels, tire size 7.5x18 and vacuum assisted servo mechanical 16 inch drum brakes all round.

- The fork and blade connecting rods V-12 engine has separate cylinder blocks. The engine was potent, powerful and durable. It did have a flaw and that was in the cost of manufacturing. It was so expensive, that within two years it was no longer offered.

- The KB Series 231 was available as this 4-door Limousine, as 4-door All Weather Brougham (13 units built), as 4-door All Weather Brougham Cabriolet (14 units built), as 4-door Berline 2 Window (74 units built), as Berline 3 Window (74 units built), as 4-door Convertible Sedan (20 units built), as 4-door Dual Cowl Sport Phaeton (30 units built), as 4-door Sedan / 5 passengers (216 units built), as 4-door Sedan / 7 passengers (266 units built), as 4-door Sport Berline (8 units built), as 4-door Sport Phaeton (13 units built), as 4-door Sport Touring (24 units built), as 4-door Town Sedan, 2 Window (123 units built), as 4-door Town Sedan, 3 Window (200 units built), as 2-door Convertible Roadster (112 units built), as 2-door Convertible Victoria (10 units built), as 2-door Coupé (123 units built), as 2-door Sport Roadster (3 units built) and as rolling chassis (only 1 unit delivered) and assembled at the Lincoln Assembly, Detroit (Michigan) and Long Beach Assembly, Long Beach (California).

- Coachbuilders like Waterhouse, LeBaron, Dietrich, Judkins, Brunn and Willoughby built specifically for their customer. The most popular designs were group ordered by Lincoln and made available to a wider selection of buyers. The bodies were built in advance (“Catalog Custom”) with some available to customers to be trimmed to their exact specifications.

- Side mounted spare wheels and tires, Michelin blackwall tires, leather interior, a Philco Transistone Radio, a Waltham electric clock, a luggage rack, white wall tires, a golf-bag door on the right side, fender-mounted parking lamps, Lincoln script mirrors, smoked-glass sun visor, fog lights, a trunk iso a rumble seat and a leather-covered roof were optional.

- For President Franklin Delano Roosevelt a Convertible Limousine was built, the "Sunshine Special".

I think he looks like something from Alice in Wonderland.

These little creatures wreck havoc on my tomato plants every year! Their voracious appetite can reduce a healthy tomato plant to just stems in a matter of hours. However... they are fascinating to look at. Notice the "eyes" running down the side of it's body. Nature is so clever!

This worm was about 4-1/2" in length. I think his body looks like a Shar Pei dog!

 

The photo below shows what the tail end of the worm looks like... hence the name "horn worm".

I found this tobacco hornworm on my tomato plants on June 15, 2011. It is about 3 inches long. The tobacco hornworm is almost identical to the tomato hornworm. Please View Large Size

 

The tobacco hornworm is generally green with seven diagonal white lines on the sides and a slightly curved red horn. The tomato hornworms have eight V-shaped marks on each side and their horn is straighter and blue-black in color.

 

For compairson purposes, you can see the tomato hornworm here: www.flickr.com/photos/texaseagle/4788965034/

 

The tobacco hornworm is actually the caterpillar of the Carolina Sphinx moth which can be seen here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Manduca_sexta_female_sjh.JPG

**Update 2/19/2012 (I later found out that those are called "Tomato Horn Worm" and those white bugs are parasites which later kill the host and fly away to find other host (so another word, natural predator for Tomato Horn Worm. (so my Title is so wrong .. but I will leave it as my mistake) :)

   

How would you like it? Over Medium? Scrambled? or Raw?

 

:-p

 

These guys are always after my Tomatoes! They are so happy with me not using any chemical in my garden, they are now starting family, having babies ... Even when I spot them, I don't have the heart to kill them .. especially when she's carrying so many of her eggs :( ... Maybe I should let those chicken deal with this trouble :)

The large green animal is a Horn Worm ( Tomato or Tobacco) it's the same . . . . just depends on which plant you find it. The white sacs are eggs that have been laid by a parasitoid wasp. This is a good thing, the eggs that is. The eggs hatch and the larvae feed on the worm and cause desiccation and ultimate death. Then the adult parasitoid wasp ( smaller that typical wasps) emerge as a new generation of beneficial insects.

Available light. Hand held.

Heirloom tomato plant

tomato horn worm is a nasty pest in a veggie garden!

HMM

thank you everyone!

Just last year I first joined flickr, although I had enjoyed viewing other pics on the site for quite some time. The last photo down was the first pic uploaded on flickr (as family and vacation pics were what I had on hand). Thanks to all of you for your encouragement and comments, or I wouldn't be here today-still enjoying flickr.

 

This is a photo of 1 of 8 Tomato Horn Worms found on our 1 tomato plant in 2 days. They devoured the top half of the plant. We'll see if the tomatoes still make it.

I felt very sorry for this horn worm, so I got the tweezers and picked off all the parasitic eggs and put him on a tomato vine. It squirmed a bit, but before I removed the eggs, it was in a 'zombie' state and was not moving at all.

I got this guy a couple weeks ago. He's still a baby, but this species doesn't ever get very big. At 2 1/2 inches, the hornworm isn't fully grown either.

This guy was munching on one of my Stupice Tomato plants. He's living in a habitat in my classroom now supplied with as much tomato greenery as he can handle.

Manduca quinquemaculata

 

or the common Horn worm that destroys tomatos . found 2 of these on my plant. photographed in my new macro studio

This is the second one I found this on my tomato plants.

The female braconid wasps inject eggs into the caterpillar’s body, the larvae hatches and feeds inside the caterpillar until they mature then eat their way out through the caterpillar’s skin. Then they spin the cocoons and the adult wasps emerge later.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

A Tomato Horn Worm caterpillar.

Tomato Horn worm Caterpillars eat your tomato plants until fall when they fall off burrow into the soil and emerge next year as a beautiful and large five spotted Hawk Moth. The caterpillar is a favorite target of some species of parasitic wasps that attach their eggs to the caterpillar. When the eggs hatch the larva burrow into the caterpillar and consume it. The Caterpillar also doesn't fare well with human gardeners who find it while tending their tomato plants.

Braconid wasp larvae on a green hornworm

© Jim Gilbert 2010 all rights reserved

 

Doing pretty well given the parasite load it carried.

 

Wagner Arboretum, Warren Township, NJ

Over 3 inches long, this guy ate a large number of leaves before I discovered him.

better view

Horn worms on my tomatoes...not any more!! RIP, monsters.

I found this rascal on my tomato plants yesterday. Commonly referred to as a Tomato Horn Worm, it is actually the caterpillar of the Five-spotted Hawkmoth. You can see what the moth looks like here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Manduca_quinquemaculata_adult_...

I do not know if this is a tomato horn worm or a tobacco horn worm, but it was on my tomato plant.

A Tomato Horn Worm caterpillar.

Tomato Horn worm Caterpillars eat your tomato plants until fall when they fall off burrow into the soil and emerge next year as a beautiful and large five spotted Hawk Moth. The caterpillar is a favorite target of some species of parasitic wasps that attach their eggs to the caterpillar. When the eggs hatch the larva burrow into the caterpillar and consume it. The Caterpillar also doesn't fare well with human gardeners who find it while tending their tomato plants.

More from the horn worm encounters.

Images taken with Sony A7s, SEL50M28 FE macro lens. I used autofocus and it worked great with the close focus limit turned on. I used a Yongnuo Flahs in manual mode, with a lens mounted collapsible diffuser. I shot raw and edited in lightroom 5. The root borer was dead, but the spider and the horn worm were alive - not sure how much longer the horn worm lived... Our chickens got it after I photographed it. Totally gross in my opinion... A wasp that lays eggs into its skin, so the babies can hatch and eat it up - sounds like the theme of the Alien movies to me.

This little guy was only about an inch long and crawling on my sweet pepper plant. I think it's a young Tomato Hornworm which means it will become a Sphinx Moth. So, do I squish it and save my plant which has five nicely developing peppers, or do I let it be, sacrifice some of the plant, and let a glorious moth live out its life? For now I'm letting it be.

View Large On Black

 

I took this photo at the Museum of Natural History in Washington DC in the spring of 2005, at an exhibit of live, unusually large insects - where you could actually hold and touch these incredible insects. I am really disgusted by big bugs, but these were quite friendly as they were handled all the time by the ladies showing them off, always holding them.

 

When I had a big garden many years ago, I planted rows of tomato plants. They were thriving and I was excited about harvesting some fresh tomatoes Then I came home from work one day and the plants were covered with these huge green caterpillars like this one, and they had eaten all the tomato plants down to nothing...hardly any leaves were left.

 

INFORMATION ON THE TOBACCO HORN WORM

 

Description: The larval stage of this insect is a 3 1/2 to 4 inch long pale green caterpillar with 5 pairs of prolegs and a "horn" on the last segment. The two most common hornworms are the tobacco hornworm (7 diagonal white stripes and, most commonly, a red horn) and the tomato hornworm ("V" shaped markings with a horn that is often black). The adult of the tobacco Hornworm is the Sphinx moth. The Five-spotted Hawk Moth is the adult of the tomato hornworm. Both moths are stout-bodied, grayish-colored insects with a wing spread of 4 to 5 inches.

 

The larva is the damaging stage and feeds on the leaves and stems of the tomato plant leaving behind dark green or black droppings. Though initially quite small with a body about the same size as its horn, these insects pass through 4 or 5 larval stages to reach full size in about a month. The coloration of this larva causes it to blend in with its surroundings and is often difficult to see despite its large size. It eventually will burrow into the soil to pupate. There are two generations a year.

Tomato Horn Worm I found on a Tomato plant. I love those false eyes on the side.

 

This bright (horn worm?) caught our attention at Paint Creek dam last weekend. Funny how everyone yells for me when they see a bug, worm, etc. They must know how buggy I am.....

 

The rear of the caterpillar was interesting, as seen in the photo below.

Images taken with Sony A7s, SEL50M28 FE macro lens. I used autofocus and it worked great with the close focus limit turned on. I used a Yongnuo Flahs in manual mode, with a lens mounted collapsible diffuser. I shot raw and edited in lightroom 5. The root borer was dead, but the spider and the horn worm were alive - not sure how much longer the horn worm lived... Our chickens got it after I photographed it. Totally gross in my opinion... A wasp that lays eggs into its skin, so the babies can hatch and eat it up - sounds like the theme of the Alien movies to me.

Tobacco hornworm wrapped around this red retaining wall bolt.

Explore Sept 15 Highest position #140. THANK YOU.

Thanks for viewing and commenting ;)

My friend bought a bunch (like 10+) tobacco hornworms to keep as pets--at least for a little while. I liked this one because it was a really vibrant turquoise color. It spent the evening hanging out on a potato chunk.

Every time I go out into the garden to get tomatoes and peppers, I find another one of these pests, but I think this is the biggest one I've ever seen. He measured a little over 3 1/2 inches. (That's about 18 centimeters for the rest of the world) Most of my tomato plants are decimated by these things. But I had fun taking pictures of him and preserving his image for posterity before squishing him.

These are the laval cases of which most probably is the Horn Moth (Ceratophaga vastella) but to be sure one would have to have a good close look at the moth. Some of the cases are occupied and others are empty. The larvae are voracious eaters of keratin, so any ungulate horns or hooves that lie for any time on African savannas eventually get infested with these critters!

 

Image taken in Ruaha National Park of Tanzania.

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