new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged household+tips

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL SEPTEMBER 2012

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

This is one of a collection of photos i created for a little project organised by the Pavilion Art Gallery in the Holbeck Urban Village on the outskirts of leeds.

 

(Quick note on this one - this is as found (other than rotating around the cup handle a little. I particularly like the way that someone's created a more recognisable environment of the junk in this shot, and the lamp-shade shot where someones placed the lampshade on a tree)

 

The brief was to create a collection of grouped photos of something you see everyday that gets overlooked.

 

Since the partial collapse of the historic Temple Mill building next door to my work's office, my route to work had to change slightly, and i found myself driving through a not particularly nice bit of wasteland.

A lunchtime a couple of weeks ago i went for a wonder around it and found an interesting sofa. I decided i'd expand it into a collection of photos for the project, as it's a place that's very easy for you to dismiss and ignore.

 

When i started to look for things of interest, i soon realised that there was an awful lot of house-hold junk, things that are more commonly found in a house, now found in a somewhat contextually alien landscape, so i zeroed in on this to form the subject of my collection.

 

Also, part of what i wanted to do (and the reason for taking the initial sofa shot) was that, as a landscape-y photographer a lot of my photography is presenting things that are already beautiful in a beautiful way, and i felt drawn to the idea of trying to portray an un-beautiful landscape in a beautiful way too.

 

The critique at the end of the 2 weeks we had to take photos was very interesting, both from the prospective of seeing and discussing what everyone else had taken (which was both varied and universally excellent - very interesting stuff!), i think the general gist was there is essentially a mix of 2 styles here - traditional landscape (eg the sofa, the bathtub) and items that are still within a landscape but much more item-led (the lampshade, the dolls head, the sofa arm).

I think i need to continue taking photos as a longer-term project to expand the range of images i have, and then decide if, as a presentable work, if it's about the objects themselves, or if it's about the context of the objects within the landscape. Either im going to have to expand the area i'm shooting in for this, or take more photos over time as more is dumped there.

  

Household tips on cleaning glass, ceilings, china, bottles, paint and bedsteads, with advice on taking Vinol for people with stomach troubles. Part of a booklet entitled "Aunt Rebecca Says".

Household tips for curing baby's rashes, corns, bunions, boils, eczema and car sickness on p.12 and a testimonial on Vinol's effectiveness for weak lungs on p.13. Part of a booklet entitled "Aunt Rebecca Says".

Household tips on cleaning metals on p.4, with a testimonial that "Vinol is Just the Thing for Feeble Old People" on p.5. Part of a booklet entitled "Aunt Rebecca Says".

Household tips and advice on taking Vinol for convalescents. Part of a booklet entitled "Aunt Rebecca Says".

   

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL SEPTEMBER 2012

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

WATER PEBBLES

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

                

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                                                                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

         

See where this picture was taken. [?]

...I decided to repost this handy kitchen household tip for those of my friends that missed it the first time around...I wonder how many of you are now using those tabs...lolololololol. Getting ready to go out for a bit...I'll visit your streams when we get back. I hope you're having a wonderful day, my friends. :~}

 

...a friend sent me this suggestion, and you know I just had to share it...hahahahah. :~}

 

I've been using aluminum foil for more years than I care to remember. Great stuff, but sometimes it can be a pain. You know, like when you are in the middle of doing something and you try to pull some foil out and the roll comes out of the box. Then you have to put the roll back in the box and start over.

The darn roll always comes out at the wrong time. Well, I would like to share this with you. Yesterday I went to throw out an empty Reynolds foil box and for some reason I turned it and looked at the end of the box. And written on the end it said, 'Press tab to lock end,' or 'Press to secure roll.' Right there on the end of the box is a tab to lock the roll in place. How long has this little locking tab been there? I then looked at a generic brand of aluminum foil and it had one too.

I then looked at a box of Saran wrap and it had one too! I can't count the number of times the Saran wrap roll has jumped out when I was trying to cover something up. I'm sharing this with everyone who didn't know this and those of you who already knew it. If you didn’t know this, e-mail me and let me know so I won’t feel so 'out of the loop.' I hope I'm not the only person that didn't know or had forgotten about this.

 

...rats...foiled again...lolololol...I hope your weekend is rolling right along, my friends. :~}

 

***an update...I just found out Reynolds has only been doing this since 1996...12 years...whew, and I thought I was tearing up my hands foolishly for longer...lolol. :~O

 

*** Thank you my friends...Explore #332 10/25/08 ***

my 'go green' item for this card is the inside of this making memories packaging. it was part of my goodie bag from papergirl (tiffany) when we 1st met in person. it was too pretty to throw out this cute lavender polkadot packaging! i used the top note die & decided to use the negative to frame this stamp. see here for the original item: www.flickr.com/photos/19184395@N06/3550414908/

 

i also used a page from the book "heloise from A-Z". a book of household tips i got back in my 1st few yrs of being married! i took a pg from the gardening section!

 

stamped & cut out from K4923. this card took a LOOOOOOOONG time believe it or not!!! much longer than my other projects for this week's challenge. i cut & adhered each flower. THEN i cut & adhered each leaf. very time consuming and my fingers hurt.

 

TFL!!

wearandcheer.com/9-things-make-home-stylish/

 

Home

Home is our favorite place where we live and find peace. But our home should be very beautiful and stylish because it leaves a positive impression because a simple and neat house give us piece of mind, and our body become relax and fresh, we feel good to decorate our home and make it more...

by Farida Sarwar on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/9-things-make-home-stylish/

You must like it and share it with your friends.

From Lucy's Notebook, a helpful household tips book, ostensibly by Lucille Ball.

I love this illustration of the woman with her jaunty apron and spiffy hairdo, featured on the cover of a vintage household tips booklet published by Louisiana Power and Light.

wearandcheer.com/use-homemade-bronzer/

Woo bronzer is a fascinating and unique product that women are using in their makeup. It is used to create the sun-kissed look. When you apply it correctly, it makes your look very attractive, sexy, gorgeous and beautiful. It also used for contouring and adds some shine or shimmer to face....

by Sobia Bilal on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/use-homemade-bronzer/

You must like it and share it with your friends.

wearandcheer.com/6-tools-that-every-girl-should-have-if-s...

Today I will discuss some tools that are extremely necessary after marriage, I think you can say here are 6 Tools that Every Girl Should have if she wants to marry. I am not talking about tools like gun, knife, sword, etc. I want to speak about the skill and way of living that and some good...

by Sobia Bilal on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/6-tools-that-every-girl-should-have-if-s...

You must like it and share it with your friends.

Spring and Fall bring many seasonal allergies and trigger adverse reactions in certain individuals. A fun infographic that describes some very easy ways that homeowners can vastly improve the quality of their indoor air.

wearandcheer.com/attractive-weight-losing/

Everybody wants to be attractive its quiet true but how it’s a common question, I’ll mention here How to be Attractive by Weight losing, when u are overweight no any dress suits you. you lose your confidence beauty even you become a victim of depression your whole life style affects which i...

by Farida Sarwar on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/attractive-weight-losing/

You must like it and share it with your friends.

wearandcheer.com/before-after-basic-master-bedroom-gets-a...

The people are very sensitive about master bedrooms, especially the young people who have fresh relationship or wedding. The new owners of craftsman-style Los Angeles home are not perfect in meant for the master bedroom. They made the bedroom more stunning and sophisticated. It’s all due...

by Staff Author on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/before-after-basic-master-bedroom-gets-a...

You must like it and share it with your friends.

wearandcheer.com/homemade-mascara-and-liner/

I don’t use too much makeup for my face, just mascara, liner and lip gloss. My bag is always full of different types of liner and mascara first but when I use my homemade mascara and liner then throw all those chemical products and put homemade products because homemade makeup is free from the c...

by Sobia Bilal on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/homemade-mascara-and-liner/

You must like it and share it with your friends.

  

E-mail this

   

Print this

 

Advanced search

 

google_protectAndRun("ads_core.google_render_ad", google_handleError, google_render_ad);

 

• Home

 

• Search

 

• Send Comments

 

• What's New

 

• Hottest 25

Legends

 

• Odd News

 

• Glossary

 

• FAQ

 

• Autos

 

• Business

 

• Cokelore

 

• College

 

• Computers

 

• Crime

 

• Critter Country

 

• Disney

 

• Embarrassments

 

• Food

 

• Glurge Gallery

 

• History

 

• Holidays

 

• Horrors

 

• Humor

 

• Inboxer Rebellion

 

• Language

 

• Legal

 

• Lost Legends

 

• Love

 

• Luck

 

• Media Matters

 

• Medical

 

• Military

 

• Movies

 

• Music

 

• Old Wives' Tales

 

• Photo Gallery

 

• Politics

 

• Pregnancy

 

• Quotes

 

• Racial Rumors

 

• Radio & TV

 

• Religion

 

• Risqué Business

 

• Science

 

• September 11

 

• Sports

 

• Titanic

 

• Toxin du jour

 

• Travel

 

• Weddings

 

• Message Archive

   

Home --> Inboxer Rebellion --> Household Tips --> Cell Phone Functions

 

Cell Phone Functions

 

Claim: E-mail lists five little-known but useful functions associated with cell phones.

 

Status: Multiple — see below.

 

Example: [Collected via e-mail, February 2007]

 

THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW YOUR CELL PHONE COULD DO !!!

 

There are a few things that can be done in times of grave emergencies.

Your mobile phone can actually be a life saver or an emergency tool for

survival. Check out the things that you can do with it:

 

FIRST Subject: Emergency

 

The Emergency Number

worldwide for Mobile is 112. If you find yourself out of the coverage

area of your mobile; network and there is an emergency, dial 112 and

the mobile will search any existing network to establish the emergency

number for you, and interestingly this number 112 can be dialed even if

the keypad is locked. Try it out.

 

SECOND Subject: Have you locked your keys in the car?

 

Does

 

your car have remote keyless entry? This may

come in handy someday. Good reason to own a cell phone: If you lock

your keys in the car and the spare keys are at home, call someone at

home on their cell phone from your cell phone. Hold your cell phone

about a foot from your car door and have the person at your home press

the unlock button, holding it near the mobile phone on their end. Your

car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to you.

Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away, and if you

can reach someone who has the other "remote" for your car, you can

unlock the doors (or the trunk). Editor's Note: It works fine! We tried

it out and it unlocked our car over

a cell phone!"

 

THIRD Subject: Hidden Battery Power

 

Imagine your cell

battery is very low. To activate, press the keys *3370# Your cell will

restart with this reserve and the instrument will show a 50% increase

in battery. This reserve will get charged when you charge your cell

next time.

 

FOURTH Subject: How to disable a STOLEN mobile phone?

 

To check your Mobile phone's serial number, key in the following digits on your phone: * # 0 6 # A 15 digit

code will appear on the screen. This number is unique to your handset.

Write it down and keep it somewhere safe. When your phone get stolen,

you can phone your service provider and give them this code. They will

then be able to block your handset so even if the thief changes the SIM

card, your phone will be totally useless. You probably won't get your

phone back, but at least you know that whoever stole it can't use/sell

it either. If everybody does this, there would be no point in people

stealing mobile phones.

 

And Finally.... FIFTH Subject:

 

Cell phone companies are charging us $1.00 to $1.75 or more for

411 information calls when they don't have to. Most of us do not carry

a telephone directory in our vehicle, which makes this situation even

more of a problem. When you need to use the 411 information option,

simply dial: (800) FREE 411, or (800) 373-3411 without incurring any

charge at all. Program this into your cell phone now.

 

Origins: The message

reproduced above is (with one exception) a compendium of topics we've

already covered in separate articles, so we'll just provide a brief

summary for each entry with a pointer to a more detailed explanation:

Calling 112

on your cell phone will (in some parts of the world, primarily Europe)

connect you to local emergency services, even if you are outside your

provider's service area (i.e., even if you are not authorized to relay

signals through the cell tower that handles your call), and many cell

phones allow the user to place 112 calls even if the phone lacks a SIM

card or its keypad is locked. However, the 112 number does not have (as

is sometimes claimed) special properties that enable callers to use it

in areas where all cellular signals are blocked (or otherwise

unavailable). Cars with remote keyless entry (RKE) systems cannot be unlocked

by relaying a key fob transmitter signal via a cellular telephone. RKE

systems and cell phones utilize different types of signals and transmit

them at different frequencies. The claim that pressing the sequence *3370# will unleash "hidden battery power" in a cell phone seems to be a misunderstanding of an option

available on some brands of cell phone (such as Nokia) for Half Rate

Codec, which provides about 30% more talk time on a battery charge at

the expense of lower sound quality. However, this option is enabled by

pressing the sequence *#4720# — the sequence *3370# actually enables Enhanced Full Rate Codec, which provides better sound quality at the expense of shorter battery life. Entering the sequence *#06# into a cell phone may display a 15-digit identification string, but that function only works with some types of cell phones, and the efficacy of reporting the ID number to a cellular service provider to head off unauthorized use of a lost or stolen phone is limited. Some business outfits such as (800) FREE-411

do provide free directory assistance services to cell phone customers.

However, users should note that the service is "free" in the sense that

FREE-411 provides directory information to callers at no

charge, but cellular service providers may still assess charges related

to placing such calls.

 

Last updated: 15 February 2007

 

The URL for this page is www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/cellphones.asp

 

Urban Legends Reference Pages © 1995-2009 by Barbara and David P. Mikkelson.

This material may not be reproduced without permission.

snopes and the snopes.com logo are registered service marks of snopes.com.

  

google_protectAndRun("ads_core.google_render_ad", google_handleError, google_render_ad);

 

--- On Thu, 6/11/09, Bonnie May wrote:

LIVERPOOL International Garden Festival

 

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

WATERED PEBBLES

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

    

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

From Lucy's Notebook, a helpful household tips book, ostensibly by Lucille Ball.

   

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

   

See where this picture was taken. [?]

A CHINESE WATER FEATURE

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

 

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

    

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

LIVERPOOL International Garden Festival

 

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

The Boston Budget and the Beacon, Vol. XXXVII No. 12, March 21, 1908. The magazine is a combination of gossip column, household tips, stories, poetry and book reviews.

 

The cover features Thomas W. Lawson, a businessman and novelist, and his granddaughter Vera Lawson.

 

2009.05.666c

 

Museum of American Finance

Have a stain on a white garment? It's not nessesarily ruined .

 

So you've tried every option and stain removal product on the market but you can't get the stain out of that shirt?

 

Your ready to toss it into the garbage?

 

DON'T ...It can be saved !

 

Here's how...

 

You will need a small amount of white paint.

Any house paint or fabric paint in a matching color will work.

 

These days you can get a quart of almost any color at your local walmart.

However I don't go out and buy every matching color of every garment I own.

That wouldnt be very economical.

 

(I have stored under my kitchen sink a quart of white, a quart of black , and red.

Then I have mason jars that I store any left over paints in , even if it's just a tiny bit I keep it.)

 

Now back to applying the camo.

 

Using just a tiny bit of the paint, add an equal amount of water and mix it up , this can be done on a plate or a piece of plastic .

 

Get out your iron and preheat it or you can use your dryer.

 

Now you will want to paint the stain with the watery paint.

(Don't worry , you won't have a hard spot of paint on your garment.)

When you can no longer see the stain,

Let it sit for an hour.

 

Lay a piece of paper or thin fabric over the top (where the stain was) and iron it or throw it in the dryer .(By itself)

You want the paint to be completely dry after this step , this sets the paint.

 

When you get it out of the dryer or finish setting the paint with your iron, inspect the article .

If you can still see the stain, repeat all of the steps above and then re-inspect.

 

Your shirt or article of clothing should now be white again.

 

You may want to wash it before wearing it but you have just saved that article from being a part of your local landfill ...

Your on your way to being green and you've just saved your family some money not having to buy a new white shirt !

   

Thanks for reading and please visit our ebay store stores.ebay.com/reduse-reuse-recycle-rethink where we sell gently used jeans.

Picked up all at the same yard sale.

 

Trader Vic's Pacific Island Cookbook, c. 1968

 

A Taste of Aloha (Jr League of Honolulu) c, 2000

 

Betty Crockers Bisquick Cookbook, c. 1971

 

Atlanta Cooks for Company, c. 1968

 

Acworth's Favorite Recipes (Acworth Garden Club) circa 1960's

 

700 of the Best Household Tips, c. 1980

 

Foxfire 2, c.1973

 

Gems from Georgia's Kitchens (Garden Club of GA), c. 1963

  

THE EDGE OF THE PAGODA

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

    

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

ACROSS THE POND

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

 

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

I'd never heard of this one before, until I found a few copies in an antique mall booth the other day. It's similar to the 1940's Ladies Home Journals in content, complete with the fiction short stories and household tip articles.

Lockdown has resulted in fly tipping at west march road on a enormous scale sale all indications are its mostly Glasgow addresses within the flytipping

SUMMER PALACE ON THE POND

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

    

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

This was my other grandmother's book. Meant for the new bride, these books contain recipes as well as household tips. This one is copywrighted 1929, but they were married in 1939 ... it seems to have been a standard book published in CA that would be re-issued locally with local advertisements and coupons included in it. This one is from Peoria, IL, and contains many (some unused) local coupons and advertisements for dry cleaners, banks, photo studios, the Peoria newspaper, etc. Love the graphics!

wearandcheer.com/10-awesome-ways-to-up-cycle-old-books/

 

It might give the 10 Awesome Ways to up-cycle Old Books, although if it’s not plateful an idea or it is declining apart at its line of stitching, I enthusiastically trust in generous it a new life and idea. If you can’t bear to reuse any of your own books, then you are to find profusion fit for ...

by Amber Shafi on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/10-awesome-ways-to-up-cycle-old-books/

You must like it and share it with your friends.

A BRIDGE CROSSING

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

    

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

   

See where this picture was taken. [?]

CHINESE GARDEN

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

 

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

    

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

My gift from my mother-in-law was this book, The Best of Mrs. Beeton's Household Tips. It came with a tag that said "Lynn, Knowing your love of tradition.....Love, Mum". Such a great gift for me! I do love it =)

 

Day 51 of 365

   

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

   

See where this picture was taken. [?]

From Lucy's Notebook, a helpful household tips book, ostensibly by Lucille Ball.

This *silly* picture is for my Great Great Auntie Claurie. I got lost today in her old diaries, written daily since 1907 and her mothers and sisters aswell.

 

When I was little I used to wish she'd be at my 18th birthday (23rd of this summer) because she would be 100, And she so nearly made it... She passed away before christmas at 99! So things don't always work out perfectly, or evenly. But for the most part.. they seem to work out.

 

If 100 years later your scribblings and household tips can amuse a cheeky teenager and inspire her (away from her studies).

wearandcheer.com/9-tips-to-help-you-cook-faster/

Everybody wants to cook food immediately and there are many times when you can easily cook food, drinking a glass of wine even as tune or a podcast drama softly in the environment. But at least for me, food preparation is typically a race against the clock to find dinner on the table.

I love...

by Farida Sarwar on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/9-tips-to-help-you-cook-faster/

You must like it and share it with your friends.

Lockdown has resulted in fly tipping at west march road on a enormous scale sale all indications are its mostly Glasgow addresses within the flytipping

Lockdown has resulted in fly tipping at west march road on a enormous scale sale all indications are its mostly Glasgow addresses within the flytipping

Lockdown has resulted in fly tipping at west march road on a enormous scale sale all indications are its mostly Glasgow addresses within the flytipping

Lockdown has resulted in fly tipping at west march road on a enormous scale sale all indications are its mostly Glasgow addresses within the flytipping

1 3 4 5