new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged igarka

Yamal. 2019 September. Forest-tundra. The current state of the so-called"Dead road". The Transpolar railway was to connect Salekhard on the Ob river with Igarka on the Yenisei river. In 1953, construction stopped.

Russia Explores Re-Development Of Its Trans-Polar Railway

 

April 21, 2020

Posted by Russia Briefing

 

Abandoned Stalin-Era Northern Latitudinal Project May Receive A New Lease Of Life

 

Op/Ed by Chris Devonshire-Ellis

 

The Russian Geographical Society (RGS) has been exploring the length of the Stalin proposed Trans-Polar Railroad, also known as the Northern Latitudinal Railway, and have been installing geo-thermal equipment to evaluate the potential for reviving the project.

 

The expedition members have registered measurements at 19 locations, where the equipment was installed in autumn. Two new locations have also been surveyed, at the northernmost (Dudinka) and southernmost (Krasnoselkup) points of the railway. The RGS explorers covered 3,800 km across snow, river ice and mountains between Snezhnogorsk and Norilsk.

 

russias-proposed-trans-polar-railway_

 

“The expedition’s area is a huge triangle with vertices in Urengoi, Turukhansk and Norilsk. The shortest, southern, side is at least 500 km long,” an RGS scientist said. “The Polar Circle divides the triangle in two almost equal parts, where there are practically no roads, only ice roads that in winter connect oil and gas deposits.”

 

Construction of a railway line between Korotchayevo, Igarka and Norilsk began in 1949. The labor force was Soviet prisoners. After Joseph Stalin’s death in 1953, the construction was abandoned.

Stalin’s intention was to develop a railroad across northern Siberia to reach the then Soviet Union’s easternmost territories. The planned route from Igarka to Salekhard measures 1,297 kilometres in length. Parts of the project did come to fulfillment. A rebuilt section of the railway between Nadym and Novy Urengoy on the east bank of the Nadym River is still in use, as is the extreme western section connecting Labytangi and Vorkuta.

 

The section from Salekhard to Nadym is already under reconstruction, and includes a new bridge over the River Ob, which will connect Salekhard to the rest of the Russian railway system via Labytnangi. Development of these lines is expected to be completed by 2030.

 

Russia is keen to develop its Arctic regions as global warming starts to open up areas previously accessible. The Northern Sea Route adds a faster transportation potential for shipping between Asia and Europe, while the Arctic Ocean has massive oil and gas energy deposits. Lands previously un-used may become arable.

Russia Address: Ulitsa Chubynina, 38, Salekhard, Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, Russia, 629007

---

Gbu Yanao "Yamalo-Nenetskiy Okruzhnoy Muzeyno-Vystavochnyy Kompleks Imeni I.s. Shemanovskogo"

(DN Surfer)

---

Salekhard (Russian: Салеха́рд; Khanty: Пуӆңават, Pułñawat; Nenets: Саляʼ харад, Salja’ harad) is a town in Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, Russia, serving as the okrug's administrative centre. It crosses the Arctic Circle, the main parts being about 1 kilometer (0.62 mi) south and suburbs stretching to the north of the circle.

 

The settlement of Obdorsk (Обдорск) was founded in 1595, in the place of a Khanty settlement called Polnovat-Vozh (Полноват-вож), by Russian settlers after the conquest of Siberia. It was situated on the Ob River, and its name supposedly derives from that. The land around Obdorsk was referred to as Obdorsky krai, or Obdoriya.

 

The town was often used as a place of exile during the Tsarist and Soviet periods. Among notable people who spent time here were the Doukhobor spiritual leader Pyotr Verigin and Leon Trotsky. The town and nearby area contained three Soviet camps where approximately 6,500 prisoners were held, arrested for their belief in God. At the port of Salekhard, approximately 1,500 prisoners loaded and unloaded goods at the dock, or mined metal ores. About 5,000 prisoners in two camps near Salekhard were assigned to polish diamonds mined from Mir mine.

 

The nearest railway station is at Labytnangi on the opposite side of the river Ob. From 1949 to 1953, the Salekhard-Igarka Railway project made an unsuccessful attempt to extend the line to Igarka, claiming the lives of thousands of Gulag prisoners. The section of railway from Salekhard to Nadym was completed and remained in use for some time in the Soviet era, although it was later abandoned. It is currently being rebuilt, along with a long-awaited bridge across the Ob between Labytnangi and Salekhard.

 

Salekhard was the host city for the 2006 Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting in October 2006.

 

In April 2014, Rostelecom, a Russian Internet service provider, completed the final stretch of the Nadym-Salekhard optical internet line. That same line stretches for almost 3,500 kilometres (2,200 mi).

 

In summer 2016, after temperatures as high as 95 °F (35 °C) thawed anthrax infected corpses frozen since 1941 near Salekhard, anthrax spores infected reindeer herds and herders.

 

Yamal Airlines has its head office in Salekhard.

 

By 2015, about 3 kilometres (1.9 miles) from the airport, near the Arctic circle, authorities plan to build a large polar resort "Center of the Arctic tourism."

 

Salekhard is located in the Ob river valley and is an important river port of the Russian Far North. The unfinished Salekhard–Igarka Railway was set to provide a rail connection between the Ob river port of Salekhard and the Yenisei river port of Igarka. Currently, the nearest railway is at Labytnangi (on the Salekhard–Igarka Railway), 20 kilometres (12 mi) northwest on the opposite side of the river Ob. The project Northern Latitudinal Railway will provide Salekhard access to railway and a long-awaited bridge across the Ob between Labytnangi and Salekhard, and will further connect Salekhard to the Konosha-Vorkuta railway and other parts of European Russia.

 

For 9–10 months of year, the river is frozen and cars and trucks can cross via the river ice. In the summer a ferry operates, however during the floating of ice, generally shortly before the start and shortly after the end of summer, Salekhard is effectively cut off from the outside world, regarding freight. During these periods, only helicopters are able to reach Salekhard in case of emergency. Native people, mainly the Nenets and Khanty people, always build up stocks of food at home, in the shops, and in the markets during this period, but they still suffer from seasonal price increasing. The city is also served by the Salekhard Airport which is located 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) north of the main city (Wikipedia).

  

c/n 147001514. Wreckage at Igarka, Russia. It had been involved in an incident in 1987.

c/n 147001317. Derelict at Igarka, Russia. Was withdrawn from use in 1987 and scrapped in 2005.

c/n 147001424. Derelict at Igarka, Russia. Was an ice reconnaissance aircraft. Was withdrawn from use by 1988. Later scrapped.

c/n 147001325. Derelict at Igarka, Russia. Was still in service in 1986. Scrapped in 2005.

 

The Vankor Field is an oil and gas field in Russia, located 130 km west of Igarka in the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai in Eastern Siberia, close to the border with Yamal. Its estimated reserves are 520 million metric tons of oil and 95 billion cubic meters of natural gas. The field is operated by Russian national oil company Rosneft. July, 2013.

Igarka airport in northern Russia, mandatory stop to head towards the Vankor oilfield...which has burnt down a few years ago. A true piece of old CCCP history gone :-(

The Vankor Field is an oil and gas field in Russia, located 130 km west of Igarka in the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai in Eastern Siberia, close to the border with Yamal. Its estimated reserves are 520 million metric tons of oil and 95 billion cubic meters of natural gas. The field is operated by Russian national oil company Rosneft. July, 2013.

The Vankor Field is an oil and gas field in Russia, located 130 km west of Igarka in the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai in Eastern Siberia, close to the border with Yamal. Its estimated reserves are 520 million metric tons of oil and 95 billion cubic meters of natural gas. The field is operated by Russian national oil company Rosneft. July, 2013.

The Vankor Field is an oil and gas field in Russia, located 130 km west of Igarka in the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai in Eastern Siberia, close to the border with Yamal. Its estimated reserves are 520 million metric tons of oil and 95 billion cubic meters of natural gas. The field is operated by Russian national oil company Rosneft. July, 2013.

The Vankor Field is an oil and gas field in Russia, located 130 km west of Igarka in the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai in Eastern Siberia, close to the border with Yamal. Its estimated reserves are 520 million metric tons of oil and 95 billion cubic meters of natural gas. The field is operated by Russian national oil company Rosneft. July, 2013.

The Vankor Field is an oil and gas field in Russia, located 130 km west of Igarka in the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai in Eastern Siberia, close to the border with Yamal. Its estimated reserves are 520 million metric tons of oil and 95 billion cubic meters of natural gas. The field is operated by Russian national oil company Rosneft. July, 2013.

c/n 147001325. Derelict at Igarka, Russia. Was still in service in 1986. Scrapped in 2005.

Most of SACs combat casualties during the Cold War were in this model during overflights of the USSR. One of them supposedly flew as far inland as Igarka along the Yenisei River in Siberia. That's roughly 390 NM(!) due south of the coast of the Kara Sea.Check it out in Google Earth if you get a chance. There is a long airstrip for interceptors there that would've been the target in time of war. I suspect SAC wanted to knock it out early and cause a huge salient in the USSR's air defense net. The heavies could've then come thru that and fanned out all over the USSR following routes to strategic targets like Moscow, Krasnoyarsk, Ozersk, Archangelsk and Vladivostok from behind.

The Vankor Field is an oil and gas field in Russia, located 130 km west of Igarka in the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai in Eastern Siberia, close to the border with Yamal. Its estimated reserves are 520 million metric tons of oil and 95 billion cubic meters of natural gas. The field is operated by Russian national oil company Rosneft. July, 2013.

c/n 0121. Wreckage at Igarka, Russia. Had been involved in an incident in 1987. IL-14 wings in the foreground.

c/n 12003. At Igarka, Russia on polar colours. Went to Yakutiya in 2004 and converted to AN-26-100. Later to IR Aero and Khabarovsk Avia.

c/n 147001424. Derelict at Igarka, Russia. Was an ice reconnaissance aircraft. Was withdrawn from use by 1988. Later scrapped.

c/n 98734440. In front of the terminal at Igarka, Russia

c/n 98520501. At Igarka, Russia. Operated by Igarka Aviation Enterprise. Crashed in 1998.

Igarka, Siberia, Russia

c/n 09902310. At Igarka, Russia. Operated by MAP Ulan-Ude. To IR Aero in 2009. Still in service in 2016.

c/n 9707. At Igarka, Russia. 'Polyarnaya Aviatsiya' badge on front fuselage. Withdrawn from use by 2001.

c/n 9902. At Igarka, Russia. 'Polyarnaya Aviatsiya' badge on front fuselage.

Most of SACs combat casualties during the Cold War were in this model during overflights of the USSR. One of them supposedly flew as far inland as Igarka along the Yenisei River in Siberia. That's roughly 390 NM(!) due south of the coast of the Kara Sea.Check it out in Google Earth if you get a chance. There is a long airstrip for interceptors there that would've been the target in time of war. I suspect SAC wanted to knock it out early and cause a huge salient in the USSR's air defense net. The heavies could've then come thru that and fanned out all over the USSR following routes to strategic targets like Moscow, Krasnoyarsk, Ozersk, Archangelsk and Vladivostok from behind.

c/n 148001903. Fuselage centre section at Igarka, Russia. Was still in service in 1986.

  

c/n 2606. At Syktyvkar, Russia. Cargoplane with seats in it chartered for our Tour. Waiting to take us on our fourth flight on it to Igarka. I think we were supposed to go to Norilsk but diverted due to bad weather. Delivered to Aeroflot as CCCP-13399 in 1974 and operated by MRP NPO "Leninets". Reregistered as RA-13399 and to Partner Aviakompaniya in 1993. To Armenia as EK-13399 in 1998. To Alfa Airlines as ST-ARL in 2004, crashed into a mountain in 2012.

   

  

c/n 2606. At Syktyvkar, Russia. Cargoplane with seats in it chartered for our Tour. Waiting to take us on our fourth flight on it to Igarka. I think we were supposed to go to Norilsk but diverted due to bad weather. Delivered to Aeroflot as CCCP-13399 in 1974 and operated by MRP NPO "Leninets". Reregistered as RA-13399 and to Partner Aviakompaniya in 1993. To Armenia as EK-13399 in 1998. To Alfa Airlines as ST-ARL in 2004, crashed into a mountain in 2012.

   

Salekhard–Igarka Railway

Map of the Stalin Railway

 

Opened 1949 - Closed 1953

Line length: 1,459 km (907 mi)

Track gauge: 1,524 mm (5 ft)

 

The 1,524 mm (5 ft) broad gauge Salekhard–Igarka Railway, (Трансполярная магистраль Transpolyarnaya Magistral, i.e. 'Transpolar Mainline') also referred to variously as Dead Road (Russian: Мёртвая дорога), and Stalinbahn, is an incomplete railway in northern Siberia. The railway was a project of the Soviet Gulag system that took place from 1947 until Stalin's death in 1953. Construction was coordinated via two separate Gulag projects, the 501 Railroad beginning on the River Ob and 503 Railroad beginning on the River Yenisey, part of a grand design of Joseph Stalin to span a railroad across northern Siberia to reach the Soviet Union's easternmost territories.

 

The planned route from Igarka to Salekhard measured 1,297 kilometres (806 mi) in length. The project was built mostly with prisoner labour, particularly that of political prisoners, and a large number perished.

 

A rebuilt section of the railway between Nadym and Novy Urengoy on the east bank of the Nadym River is still in operation, as is the extreme western section connecting Labytnangi and the railway to Vorkuta. The section from Salekhard to Nadym is planned to be rebuilt, including a new bridge over the Ob to connect Salekhard to the rest of the Russian railway system via Labytnangi. The section from Nadym to Pangody is also planned to be rebuilt (Wikipedia).

c/n 9902. At Igarka, Russia. 'Polyarnaya Aviatsiya' badge on front fuselage.

c/n 2606. At Syktyvkar, Russia. Cargoplane with seats in it chartered for our Tour. Waiting to take us on our fourth flight on it to Igarka. I think we were supposed to go to Norilsk but diverted due to bad weather. Delivered to Aeroflot as CCCP-13399 in 1974 and operated by MRP NPO "Leninets". Reregistered as RA-13399 and to Partner Aviakompaniya in 1993. To Armenia as EK-13399 in 1998. To Alfa Airlines as ST-ARL in 2004, crashed into a mountain in 2012.

 

Siberia, Russia. Igarka

KADYSZ

Obwód: Grodzieński

Rejon: Grodzieński (36 km na północny zachód od Grodna)

 

Wydarzenie: Powstanie 1863r.

 

Przy szosie Sonicze – Kopciowo (nie jest teraz użytkowana z powodu ustanowienia granicy Białorusi z Litwą), około 500 m za wsią Kadysz znajduje się miejsce pochówku powstańców 1863 r. Jest to mogiła ziemna z niewysokim żelaznym krzyżem, a także z wysokim krzyżem drewnianym i pamiątkową kamienną płytą z inskrypcją:

BOJOWNIKOM

1863 r.

Całość jest ogrodzona drewnianym płotkiem.

Według Stanisława Zielińskiego, badacza dziejów powstania styczniowego, w powiecie augustowskim oddziałami powstańczymi od maja 1863 r. dowodził Ramotowski (Wawer). W maju 1863 r. oddział Wawra zatrzymał się na południe od Kanału Augustowskiego nieopodal Sopoćkiń. Po drugiej stronie Kanału nad rzeką Igarką na odcinku drogi od Kopciowa do Sopoćkiń stał oddział kapitana Brandta, a od Maciewicz do Kadysza Oddział Wiktora Hłaski. 20 maja wojska rosyjskie zorganizowały wyprawę przeciwko oddziałom powstańczym. Dwie roty piechoty i pluton Kozaków pod dowództwem kap. Kułakowa wysłane przez Kopciowo miały zaatakować Wawra od strony Sopoćkiń. W tym czasie połączone oddziały powstańcze Brandta i Hłaski podeszły pod Kadysz, celem utrzymania mostów pod Czortkiem na Kanale Augustowskim i Kadyszem na Czarnej Hańczy. 21 maja po zajęciu Kadysza Rosjanie zostali zaatakowani przez dwa oddziały powstańcze, które po zaciętej walce wycofały się w kierunku Podlipek. Według S. Zielińskiego w stoczonej bitwie poległo 14 powstańców. Imiona 4 z nich są znane: oficer Józef Hłaski, Pronaszko, Budkiewicz, Werpachowski. Dwóch powstańców dostało się do niewoli, jeden z nich – Kozłowski, żołnierz napoleoński.

W tym samym dniu idący z pomocą oddział Wawra został zaatakowany przez rotę piechoty i oddział Kozaków. Po krótkiej potyczce Rosjanie byli zmuszeni wycofać się w kierunku Kadysza. Zostały również uwolnione z pościgu przez moskali oddziały wcześniej prowadzące walkę pod Kadyszem. Po czym oddział Wawra ruszył w kierunku Kodzi. Tam odniósł zwycięstwo nad przeważającymi siłami wojska rosyjskiego, zmuszając ich do ucieczki. S. Zieliński pisze: …Rozpoczęła się nowa walka ogniowa między dwoma łańcuchami tyralierów na 500, a potem na 200 kroków. Bój taki, mało szkodliwy dla powstańców, ukrytych za sosnami, trwał 1½ godziny, gdy zaś moskale chwiać się poczęli, wtedy kosynierzy pod dowództwem Tadeusza Wojczyńskiego i Orechwy rzucili się na chwiejące się szeregi moskiewskie i zmusili je do bezładnej ucieczki ku Kadyszowi, po czym oddział o godzinie 7 wieczorem ruszył za rzekę Marychę.

W walkach szczególnie się odznaczyli dowódca kawalerii Wincenty Reklewski, kawalerzyści: Jan Koncewicz, Jan Puciatycki, Adolf Wróblewski, Józef Szajba, Bronisław Muszyński, Stanislaw Orechwa, dowódca II Kampanii Kosynerow, Adam Gawroński, Artur Bieńkowski, Władysław Białkowski, Tomasz Krzywiec, Eugeniusz Kuszewski, Felicjan Klimkiewicz, Karol Jagielski.

Andrzej Janulewicz, nauczyciel z Sopoćkiń relacjonuje, że miejsce to jest zwane Lisią Górą, a pamięć tych wydarzeń przetrwała wśród ludności tu zamieszkałej. Mogiła była otoczona opieką w okresie międzywojennym i po II wojnie światowej. Żelazny krzyż i pamiątkową kamienną płytę umieszczono w 1928 roku. Nowy drewniany krzyż postawiono w 1988 roku, w tym samym czasie całość została otoczona drewnianym płotkiem. Stary drewniany krzyż z mogiły powstańczej znajduje się w kościele w Sopoćkiniach. Miejsce pamięci znajduje się w ścisłej strefie granicznej.

Mogiłą powstańczą w miarę możliwości opiekuje się miejscowa ludność polska.

 

Fot.023. Kadysz. Mogiła Powstańców 1863 r. Stan z 2009 r.

Pictured (left to right): Anne-Marie Walters, Bentley Systems; Aleksei Kruzhinov, Giprotyumenneftegaz; Igor Scherbinin, Giprotyumenneftegaz; Ken Adamson, Bentley Systems

Taimyr Peninsula, Russia

Igarka, Permafrost Museum

 

Taimyr Peninsula, Russia

Igarka, Gulag Museum

The prisoners left the labor camp when Stalin died (1953). The railway Salekhard - Igarka was never finished.

 

Taimyr Peninsula, Russia

Igarka

Igarka was a labor camp center. Some of these buildings are made by prisoners.

 

Taimyr Peninsula, Russia

Igarka, Gulag Museum

 

Savely Lapitsky was born in Leningrad in 1924. His father was a doctor and his mother retouched images in a famous photo studio. In 1938 young Savely won first place in a citywide art competition and his childhood was spent honing his talents at the Youth Art Centre. His path in life was almost predetermined but war came and scrambled those plans. Savely, weakened by dystrophy, was evacuated from the Blockade of Leningrad via the Road of Life across Lake Ladoga and settled in Miass a town in the Chelyabinsk Region, where he subsequently was educated at the School of Aviation Engineering. Afterwards, he enrolled in an aviation battalion that was at the forefront of fighting across Poland, Germany, Czechoslovakia and the Subcarpathia region. Lapitsky also participated in battles that led to the liberation of the victims of the Nazi Holocaust camps. In 1947 Lapitsky was admitted to the Faculty of Journalism and Media of the Leningrad State University, however, he never got as far as graduating because at the end of 1948, he was arrested in Lviv. In May 1949, on the anniversary of Victory Day, Lapitsky, a war veteran with numerous military awards, was sentenced to ten years of imprisonment in the camps and five-years suspension of his civil rights. Those years were spent across 13 different locations in four different prison districts, including 5 years spent around the Arctic Circle. During his life in the gulags, Lapitsky took part in building the Salekhard-Igarka Railway road that later became renowned as “The Road of Death". While imprisoned, Lapitsky used to paint portraits of his fellow prisoners but even that was later forbidden by the censorship committee because of the excessive similarity with the originals. Finally, on 18th of November 1954 Lapitsky was freed from his sentence and five years later, in 1959, was fully acquitted of all charges. In 1998 Savely Lapitsky was awarded the title of “Honoured Artist of the Russian Federation”. Lapitsky continued to work until the end of his life, which came in 2012. The artist had a natural gift, a keen eye, temperament, feeling and intuition enabling him to get to the heart of any matter. All those, multiplied by his incredible work ethic, enabled him to become a true master of the graphic arts in the broadest sense. He created photo collages, as well as political and advertising posters. Lapitsky’s works usually were parts of a topical series, cycles that were connected thematically. The largest cycle of such kind was dedicated to life in the GULAG.

Taimyr Peninsula, Russia

Igarka, Permafrost Museum

 

Taimyr Peninsula, Russia

Igarka, Permafrost Museum

 

Most of SACs combat casualties during the Cold War were in this model during overflights of the USSR. One of them supposedly flew as far inland as Igarka along the Yenisei River in Siberia. That's roughly 390 NM(!) due south of the coast of the Kara Sea.Check it out in Google Earth if you get a chance. There is a long airstrip for interceptors there that would've been the target in time of war. I suspect SAC wanted to knock it out early and cause a huge salient in the USSR's air defense net. The heavies could've then come thru that and fanned out all over the USSR following routes to strategic targets like Moscow, Krasnoyarsk, Ozersk, Archangelsk and Vladivostok from behind.

Giprotyumenneftegaz – (Igarka, Krasnoyarsk Territory, Russia)

Most of SACs combat casualties during the Cold War were in this model during overflights of the USSR. One of them supposedly flew as far inland as Igarka along the Yenisei River in Siberia. That's roughly 390 NM(!) due south of the coast of the Kara Sea.Check it out in Google Earth if you get a chance. There is a long airstrip for interceptors there that would've been the target in time of war. I suspect SAC wanted to knock it out early and cause a huge salient in the USSR's air defense net. The heavies could've then come thru that and fanned out all over the USSR following routes to strategic targets like Moscow, Krasnoyarsk, Ozersk, Archangelsk and Vladivostok from behind.

Most of SACs combat casualties during the Cold War were in this model during overflights of the USSR. One of them supposedly flew as far inland as Igarka along the Yenisei River in Siberia. That's roughly 390 NM(!) due south of the coast of the Kara Sea.Check it out in Google Earth if you get a chance. There is a long airstrip for interceptors there that would've been the target in time of war. I suspect SAC wanted to knock it out early and cause a huge salient in the USSR's air defense net. The heavies could've then come thru that and fanned out all over the USSR following routes to strategic targets like Moscow, Krasnoyarsk, Ozersk, Archangelsk and Vladivostok from behind.

Most of SACs combat casualties during the Cold War were in this model during overflights of the USSR. One of them supposedly flew as far inland as Igarka along the Yenisei River in Siberia. That's roughly 390 NM(!) due south of the coast of the Kara Sea.Check it out in Google Earth if you get a chance. There is a long airstrip for interceptors there that would've been the target in time of war. I suspect SAC wanted to knock it out early and cause a huge salient in the USSR's air defense net. The heavies could've then come thru that and fanned out all over the USSR following routes to strategic targets like Moscow, Krasnoyarsk, Ozersk, Archangelsk and Vladivostok from behind.

Locomotive commemorating abortive construction of Salekhard - Igarka railway by around 100,000 prisoners, many of whom died. Photo taken on 19th March at 1155

1 3