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The Library of Congress Qa hila--Koprino 1914

 

I claim no rights other than colorizing this image if you wish to use let me know and always give due credit to The Library of Congress I have no commercial gain in publishing this image.

 

Title

Qa hila--Koprino

Summary

Qa hila, a Koprino man, bust portrait, facing front, with bone in nose.

Contributor Names

Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952, photographer

Created / Published

c1914.

Subject Headings

- Qa hila

- Indians of North America--Clothing & dress--1910-1920

- Kwakiutl Indians--Clothing & dress--1910-1920

Headings

Photographic prints--1910-1920.

Portrait photographs--1910-1920.

Notes

- J197482 U.S. Copyright Office.

- The Koprino Indians are part of the Kwakiutl group.

- Edward S. Curtis Collection (Library of Congress).

- Curtis no. 3579.

- Published in: The North American Indian / Edward S. Curtis. [Seattle, Wash.] : Edward S. Curtis, 1907-30, Suppl. v. 10, pl. 331.

 

The Library of Congress is unaware of any copyright or other restrictions in the Edward S. Curtis Collection. Absent any such restrictions, these materials are free to use and reuse.

 

Medium

1 photographic print.

Call Number/Physical Location

LOT 12328-A [P&P;]

Repository

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Digital Id

cph 3c21684 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c21684

Library of Congress Control Number

98516374

Reproduction Number

LC-USZ62-121684 (b&w film copy neg.)

Language

English

Online Format

image

Description

1 photographic print. | Qa hila, a Koprino man, bust portrait, facing front, with bone in nose.

Original Format

photo, print, drawing

LCCN Permalink

lccn.loc.gov/98516374

English Premier League 2018-19 _ Liverpool or Manchester United!!! Come on Liverpool supporters ...

 

Almost miss but just get the shot of this guy on his fanzy bike while on the street in Little India.

 

Wikitravel.org: "Brickfields is Kuala Lumpur's biggest "Little India" and is located just south of the City Center. Its main road, Jalan Tun Sambanthan, formerly knowns as Brickfields Road, is lined from end to end with shops selling Indian clothing, provisions and foodstuff.

 

Previously deemed as one of KL's less savoury areas, Brickfields is undergoing a makeover with the construction of the massive KL Sentral project on top of the old railway marshalling yards (for which Brickfields was known). The KL Sentral area now has a collection of tall office towers and also Kuala Lumpur's main railway station.

The Library of Congress

Wishran girl

 

I claim no rights other than colorizing this image if you wish to use let me know and always give due credit to The Library of Congress I have no commercial gain in publishing this image.

 

Title

Wisham (i.e. Wishran) girl, profile

Contributor Names

Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952, photographer

Created / Published

c1910.

Subject Headings

- Indians of North America--Clothing & dress--1910

- Tlakluit Indians--Clothing & dress--1910

- Indians of North America--Women--1910

- Tlakluit Indians--Women--1910

- Coins--Chinese--1910

- Headdresses--1910

Format Headings

Photographic prints--1910.

Portrait photographs--1910.

Notes

- J150310 U.S. Copyright Office.

- Title from item.

- Curtis no. 3067-10.

- Forms part of: Edward S. Curtis Collection (Library of Congress).

- Published in: The North American Indian / Edward S. Curtis. [Seattle, Wash.] : Edward S. Curtis, 1907-30, Suppl. v. 8, pl. 279.

Medium

1 photographic print.

Call Number/Physical Location

LOT 12326-A [item] [P&P]

Repository

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

Digital Id

cph 3c36566 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c36566

Library of Congress Control Number

2006676266

Reproduction Number

LC-USZ62-136566 (b&w film copy neg.)

Rights Advisory

No known restrictions on publication.

Language

English

Online Format

image

Description

1 photographic print.

LCCN Permalink

lccn.loc.gov/2006676266

Additional Metadata Formats

MARCXML Record

MODS Record

Dublin Core Record

Winner of Indian Clothing Contest at Santa Fe "Indian Market"

Rupal Patel, Model at the Photo Pro EXPO 2018 in Covington, Ky.

 

"The oldest living city in the world".

 

This was shot a few days ago as I was walking on the ghats along river Ganga in Varanasi (Benaras).

 

Those men are wearing a traditional garment in India called a dhoti which is a rectangular piece of unstitched cloth, usually around 5 yards long, wrapped about the waist and the legs, and knotted at the waist.

Among traditional Indian clothings, dhoti is one of the most ancient traditional clothing for men.

Great men like Mahatma Gandhi used to wear dhoti.

Attire worn by important political persons makes a political statement.

People say that clothes may or may not make a man but they certainly make a point when political leaders wear them.

Indian political leaders wear their political ideologies on their sleeves by choosing clothes.

So if you follow the dhoti trend in Indian political arena, they will tell altogether a different story.

 

Varanasi is one of the most conservative place, wearing a dhoti there is a statement, and shows an obvious social and political position.

However I find that this timeless garment gives a whimsical charm to those men who therefore have to walk with a real allure.

  

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

 

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.

Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).

The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

 

This series of four pictures features the younger daughter of a family that makes its living selling carved stones and other artwork to tourists visiting the Gangaur Ghat on the East shore of Lake Pichola in Udaipur.

 

I bought a couple of their pieces, so the father and the older daughter gave me permission to take these photos. I made prints at home and sent them by mail to a nearby hotel, which promised to deliver them to the family.

 

I was surprised that the girl was wearing Western clothing rather than more traditional Indian clothing.

 

Of these four images, I like this one best.

This lady is performing a dance in traditonal Indian clothing. The detail of the clothing and the pride she shows in honoring her heritage made this a favorite for me.

 

Oklahoma has 39 Indian tribes with 5 of those being native to the state.

Traditional Indian clothing for women in the north and east are saris worn with choli tops; a long skirt called a lehenga or pavada worn with choli and a dupatta scarf to create an ensemble called a gagra choli; or salwar kameez suits, while many south Indian women traditionally wear sari and children wear pattu langa, Photo in Pushkar, Rajasthan State, India

Pub Street area of Siem Reap which is the capital city of Siem Reap Province in northwestern Cambodia. It is a popular resort town and a gateway to the Angkor region.

Siem Reap has colonial and Chinese-style architecture in the Old French Quarter and around the Old Market. In the city, there are museums, traditional Apsara dance performances, a Cambodian cultural village, souvenir and handicraft shops, silk farms, rice-paddies in the countryside, fishing villages and a bird sanctuary near the Tonle Sap Lake and a vibrant, cosmopolitan drinking and dining scene.

The majority of bars and pubs of Siem Reap are concentrated in on a strip called Pub Street and surrounding alleys. The streets in the Pub Street area which is just a block away from the historic Psah Chas (Old Market) comes alive with lights and music at night. Both local and international tourists starts pouring into the bars and pubs and give the streets almost a nightly street party scene.

Pub street is often recommended as a must-see attraction in Siem Reap including “Angkor What? Bar” which was started in late 90’s by a local businessman and Temple Bar.

 

Another self-portrait from half way through my chemotherapy treatment last year, (I notice my puffy face) taken at the gorgeous Studland Bay House, UK.

I'm wearing my favourite blonde wig I had handmade by a super wig maker, Jacqueline and it was at a time I was experimenting with coloured contact lenses too. I've always had super dark eyes so it was a novelty to be able to go blue-eyed for a bit!

I'm also wearing a beautiful, intricately embellished peach & gold-coloured outfit belonging to my friend, Laura, who was there with me and kindly let me borrow it for this shoot.

It looks like a sari but it is in fact a two-piece outfit consisting of a long flared skirt and a large shawl draped over the shoulders as a matching top.

The fabric was so heavy and luxurious, and of course it was entirely handmade.. every single bead perfectly placed and sewn with love & precision.

I'm always absolutely blown away by the intricacy of Indian clothing and I'm so in love with these colours & textures, especially against the wooden stairs.

This is quite a dark hallway - I used natural light but also a silver reflector to push some light back in from a huge window behind me & to my left.

Indian child competes in the Indian Clothing competition at the Santa Fe Fiesta on the Plaza this summer (2007).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~~~Janet Murphy Photography ©2009~~~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Spirals

For how long have people depicted spiral designs in their art and architecture, and why does the image have such a provocative effect?

 

From magnetic fields to vast galaxies swirling in space, spirals can be seen in every aspect in nature. We see them in the physical forces which shape the Earth - the tides of the ocean, the winds in the atmosphere - and within life itself. Plants and the horns and shells of animals grow in spiral formations and some animals, especially aquatic species, possess a twisting locomotion.

 

The spiral phenomenon within natural forms can be explained through mathematics - the pattern is a result of complex sequences, equations and algorithms which nature utilises in her designs of the Universe. But mathematics alone cannot justify the lure of the spiral to the human mind.

 

Some of the oldest examples of human art are depictions of spirals, painted or carved into rock, often found in burial sites. Later, the Romans and Greeks used spirals as designs for vases and the columns in temples. The Celtic and Norse people were well known for the mysterious and repetitive designs found on their jewellery, clothing, weapons, objects of worship and everyday items. The Celts even painted spirals on their bodies with blue dye to intimidate enemies during battle. They also created forms of animals and plants twisting into impossible spirals, sometimes interlocking with other elements of the picture.

 

The spiral has left no human culture untouched. It is an important feature in some Australian Aboriginal works, where it is often drawn as a coiled snake. The Islamic tradition prohibits depictions of people or animals, so spirals feature as an important element in the mathematically-governed Islamic designs. Spirals also feature in oriental and Indian clothing and pottery.

 

Today, the spiral still runs deep within our culture. It forms the logos of a large number of companies, and has come to symbolise magic, dreams, desires and, most importantly, eternity.

 

It is perhaps this never-ending quality of the spiral which intrigues and draws us so greatly. When a spiral is drawn or made using paper and then turned, it creates the illusion that it is twisting forever away or towards us. The repetitive animation of a twisting spiral also evokes deep relaxation and calm, which accounts for the spiral's close association with the art of hypnotism. In some cases, people even create spirals themselves in order to ease the constantly active mind. If a person is left to "doodle" on a piece of paper in a relaxed state, it is very likely that they will draw spirals and swirls as their subconscious mind controls the pen.

 

As a representative of the eternal forces of nature, or simply as an attractive and interesting pattern, spirals shall always remain within the cultures of man. For as long as they surround us in every aspect of nature, the spiral will imprint itself within our unconscious psyche, and shall be reflected in our arts for all time.

 

Written by Megan Balanck

www.ancientspiral.com/spirals.htm

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  

Seminole patchwork apron from Florida.

 

Let's get cooking

DIVA ON BLACK. BEAUTIFUL

 

The Diva is back again. This image portrays her very essence. Essentially Indian, but living the good modern life.

 

On this Sunday trip, we found a beautiful old temple that was abandoned along East Coast Road. Instantly my mind framed her in this portrait shot.

 

The traditional temply wall would form her background. The modern Indian clothing representing her Indianness. The blackberry in her hand, suggesting that though traditional, she is up to date with times. To complete the capture, her beautiful bold attitude that shines through her face.

 

Hello World. Meet the Modern Indian Diva. She is ready to take on the world.

 

Photograph © Kausthub Desikachar

 

Photographed with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II, and Canon EF 50mm F1.2 IS USM L Lens with Sigma DG UV Filter. Handheld.

 

Please do not reproduce in any form without prior written consent from the copyright holder. Please contact the photographer through Flickrmail, to inquire about licensing arrangements.

The Library Congress Tom Poqui

 

I claim no rights other than colorizing this image if you wish to use let me know.

Summary

Head-and-shoulders portrait of Tewa woman.

Contributor Names

Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952, photographer

Created / Published

c1905.

Subject Headings

- Poqui, Tom

- Indians of North America--Clothing & dress--New Mexico--San Juan Pueblo--1900-1910

- Tewa Indians--Clothing & dress--1900-1910

Format Headings

Photographic prints--1900-1910.

Portrait photographs--1900-1910.

Notes

- H71023 U.S. Copyright Office.

- Edward S. Curtis Collection.

- Curtis no. 1760-05.

Medium

1 photographic print.

Call Number/Physical Location

LOT 12314-A [item] [P&P]

Repository

Digital Id

cph 3c12216 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c12216

Library of Congress Control Number

94514163

Reproduction Number

LC-USZ62-112216 (b&w film copy neg.)

Online Format

image

Description

1 photographic print. | Head-and-shoulders portrait of Tewa woman.

 

Edward S. Curtis Collection

Images in this collection are considered to be in the public domain.

Access: Permitted; subject to P&P policy on serving originals.

Reproduction (photocopying, hand-held camera copying, photoduplication and other forms of copying allowed by "fair use"): Permitted, subject to P&P policy on copying.

Publication and other forms of distribution: Permitted. Photographs in this collection were deposited for copyright between 1899 and 1929. Works copyrighted before 1923 are now in the public domain. The copyright for the works after 1923 was not renewed, so they are also in the public domain. (See the Copyright Office's Circular 1, "Copyright Basics, " page 6).

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Edward S. Curtis Collection, [reproduction number, e.g., LC-USZ62-123456]

A mannequin is wearing old style Seminole clothing. Ah Tah Thi Ki Seminole Indian Museum. Big Cypress Reservation. Florida

Tlingit man and woman in full dancing costumes, Alaska, 1906

 

Photographer:

Nowell, Frank H.

 

Subjects:

Kaw-claa (Tlingit Indian)

Tlingit Indians--Clothing & dress

Tlingit Indians--Women

Ceremonial dancers--Alaska--Juneau Region

Women--Alaska--Juneau Region

Men--Alaska--Juneau Region

Hats

Couples--Alaska--Juneau Region

 

Digital Collection:

Frank H. Nowell Photographs

content.lib.washington.edu/nowellweb/index.html

 

Persistent URL:

content.lib.washington.edu/u?/loc,121

 

Visit Special Collections reproductions and rights page for information on ordering a copy.

 

University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections content.lib.washington.edu/

  

Traditonal Indian clothing (pants) hanging on a rack for sale at a market. Pants are linen fabric with colorful embroidery

On October 6th, 2007 Denver Colorado celebrated(?) it's 100th anniversary of the Columbus Day parade. For about

20 years, since the parade was revived by local Italian Americans, American Indians have protested the event. They contend that Christopher Columbus was a slave trader and the catalyst to the genocide of their people.

 

Italian Americans view this as a day to celebrate their heritage. I saw only a few references to Columbus. Mostly folks in nice cars or on cool motorcycles waving U.S. and Italian flags.

The American Indians want the name changed.

Some states have changed the name of the day to Indigenous Peoples Day but I'm not sure that would work here because the Italian Americans have been having this parade for years.

 

So this is how it all went down. The protesters showed up at the Denver capital building several hours before the parade. Protesting and drumming, some in traditional American Indian clothing. Amazing workmanship and detail.

 

In the past, protesters and police had spoken beforehand about "how things would go", trying to keep things peaceful.

Going as far as planning arrests. Not this year.

Interestingly enough the leader of the anti Columbus Day group "Transform Columbus Day Alliance" is Glenn Spagnuolo, that's right Spagnuolo.

When confronted with the permits needed, Glenn stated

"We don't need a permit, because we are on native land."

www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_...

and

"Asking an illegal colonizer for permission to be on land that doesn't belong to them doesn't work for us,"

www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_...

  

Another group well represented was the American Indian Movement of Colorado. Ex and current Colorado University professors Ward Churchill and Glenn Morris are leaders of this group. Well known Russel Means is also a member, having left the main chapter of AIM.

www.russellmeans.com/aim.html

www.coloradoaim.org/

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Indian_Movement_of_Colorado

 

The American Indian Movement of Colorado is not affiliated with the American Indian Movement. View their stance here

www.aimovement.org/

aimgrandgovcouncil.blogspot.com/

 

So they followed their own route, from the capital through downtown Denver, on their way to come head to head with the Italians and their parade. They have always been peaceful and they vowed that today would be the same.

However, they had grown tired of years of words and seeing no actions.

 

When the protest met the parade, emotions ran deep and blood spilled through the streets. Not real blood however, but fake blood spilled by the protesters along with dismembered dolls. Many protesters sat in the street, stopping the parade from starting. Russell Means and Glenn Morris included. All were arrested. Nobody fought, but they did resist their arrests.

 

After this initial push by the protesters, the parade went on....a little off schedule. At this point it was lots of yelling and verbal abuse. Protesters yelling at cops and Italians. Italians, including 80 year old ladies and teenage kids, cursing and flipping the bird at protesters. Police officers, staring through mirrored sunglasses with rubber bullet guns, flashing dirty looks at everyone.

 

After the parade had traveled a few blocks, a group of young American Indians wearing bandannas over their faces made their stand and sat in the middle of the road. About 20 cops jumped on top of them and promptly pulled them apart and arrested them. The protesters didn't fight, but they did use each other as weight, locking their arms together. One of them came up bloody.

 

After this, the parade continued and the protesters headed back to the capital to spread the word. 83 protesters taken away on police buses by the time the parade was over.

   

Personally, I have no vested interest here. I'm not American Indian or Italian American. I do believe that what happened to the native people of this land is horrible. If I was Native American, after years of persecution of my people, I would probably be tired of words and lies too. However I don't have anything against Italian Americans either and I doubt their ancestors had more to do with Indian genocide than any of the other European countries that settled in the United States.

 

I think the city of Denver needs to get off their butts and do something about it. How hard is it to change the name of the parade to Italian Heritage Day or whatever and out of respect to the American Indians, have another day for them. How hard is that? 20 years, really?

 

I also realize the city is planning for the Democratic National Convention but was the show of force necessary, for a group that has maintained their peaceful approach?

A little overkill if you ask me, but then again this is a post 9/11 world, and everyone could be a terrorist.

www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1096409698

  

This man's outfit was incredible. He was very kind when I thanked him for letting me photograph him.

A Sari, saree, sadi, or shari is a South Asian female garment that consists of a drape varying from 4.5 metres to 8 metres in length and 60 cm to 1.20 m in breadth that is typically wrapped around the waist, with one end draped over the shoulder, baring the midriff.

 

The sari is usually worn over a petticoat (called 'parkar' (परकर) in Marathi lahaṅgā or lehenga in the north; seelai in Tamil, pavada (or occasionally langa) in Malayalam, Kannada and Telugu, chaniyo, parkar, ghaghra, or ghagaro in the west; and shaya in eastern India), with a fitted upper garment commonly called a blouse (ravike in South India and choli elsewhere). The blouse has short sleeves and is usually cropped at the midriff. The sari is associated with grace and is widely regarded as a symbol of Indian, Nepalese, Bangladesh, and Sri Lankan cultures.

 

ETYMOLOGY

The word sari described in Sanskrit शाटी śāṭī which means 'strip of cloth' and शाडी śāḍī or साडी sāḍī in Prakrit, and which was corrupted to sāṛī in Hindi. The word 'Sattika' is mentioned as describing women's attire in ancient India in Buddhist Jain literature called Jatakas. This could be equivalent to modern day 'Sari'. The term for female bodice, the choli is derived from another ruling clan from ancient Tamil Nadu, the Cholas. Rajatarangini (meaning the 'river of kings'), a tenth-century literary work by Kalhana, states that the Choli from the Deccan was introduced under the royal order in Kashmir.

 

ORIGINS AND HISTORY

In the history of Indian clothing the sari is traced back to the Indus Valley Civilisation, which flourished during 2800–1800 BC around the western part of the Indian subcontinent. Sari draping leaves back, cleavage, and side view of belly bare. The origin of such exposing attire can be attributed to humid climate of the land. The earliest known depiction of the sari in the Indian subcontinent is the statue of an Indus Valley priest wearing a drape.

 

Ancient Tamil poetry, such as the Silappadhikaram and the Sanskrit work, Kadambari by Banabhatta, describes women in exquisite drapery or sari. The ancient stone inscription from Gangaikonda Cholapuram in old Tamil scripts has a reference to hand weaving. In ancient Indian tradition and the Natya Shastra (an ancient Indian treatise describing ancient dance and costumes), the navel of the Supreme Being is considered to be the source of life and creativity, hence the midriff is to be left bare by the sari.

 

Sculptures from the Gandhara, Mathura and Gupta schools (1st–6th century AD) show goddesses and dancers wearing what appears to be a dhoti wrap, in the "fishtail" version which covers the legs loosely and then flows into a long, decorative drape in front of the legs. No bodices are shown.

 

Other sources say that everyday costume consisted of a dhoti or lungi (sarong), combined with a breast band called 'Kurpasika' or 'Stanapatta' and occasionally a wrap called 'Uttariya' that could at times be used to cover the upper body or head. The two-piece Kerala mundum neryathum (mundu, a dhoti or sarong, neryath, a shawl, in Malayalam) is a survival of ancient Indian clothing styles. The one-piece sari is a modern innovation, created by combining the two pieces of the mundum neryathum.

 

It is generally accepted that wrapped sari-like garments for lower body and sometimes shawls or scarf like garment called 'uttariya' for upper body, have been worn by Indian women for a long time, and that they have been worn in their current form for hundreds of years. In ancient couture the lower garment was called 'nivi' or 'nivi bandha', while the upper body was mostly left bare. The works of Kalidasa mentions 'Kurpasika' a form of tight fitting breast band that simply covered the breasts. It was also sometimes referred to as 'Uttarasanga' or 'Stanapatta'.

 

The tightly fitted, short blouse worn under a sari is a choli. Choli evolved as a form of clothing in the 10th century AD, and the first cholis were only front covering; the back was always bare but covered with end of saris pallu. Bodices of this type are still common in the state of Rajasthan.

 

In South India and especially in Kerala, women from most Hindu communities wore only the sari and exposed the upper part of the body till the middle of the 20th century.Poetic references from works like Silappadikaram indicate that during the Sangam period in ancient Tamil Nadu, a single piece of clothing served as both lower garment and head covering, leaving the midriff completely uncovered. Similar styles of the sari are recorded paintings by Raja Ravi Varma in Kerala. By the mid 19th century, though, bare breasted styles of the sari faced social revaluation and led to the Upper cloth controversy in the princely state of Travancore (now part of the state of Kerala) and the styles declined rapidly within the next half a century.

 

In ancient India, although women wore saris that bared the midriff, the Dharmasastra writers stated that women should be dressed such that the navel would never become visible. By which for some time the navel exposure became a taboo and the navel was concealed.

 

Red wedding saris are the traditional garment choice for brides in Indian culture. Sari fabric is also traditionally silk. Over time, colour options and fabric choices for Indian brides have expanded. Today fabrics like crepe, Georgette, charmeuse, and satin are used, and colours have been expanded to include gold, pink, orange, maroon, brown, and yellow as well. Indian brides in Western countries often wear the sari at the wedding ceremony and change into traditional Indian wear afterwards (lehnga, choli, etc.).

 

STYLES OF DRAPING

There are more than 80 recorded ways to wear a sari. Fashion designer Aaditya sharma declared, "I can drape a sari in 54 different styles".

 

The most common style is for the sari to be wrapped around the waist, with the loose end of the drape to be worn over the shoulder, baring the midriff. However, the sari can be draped in several different styles, though some styles do require a sari of a particular length or form. The French cultural anthropologist and sari researcher Chantal Boulanger categorised sari drapes in the following families:

 

- Nivi – styles originally worn in Andhra Pradesh; besides the modern nivi, there is also the kaccha nivi, where the pleats are passed through the legs and tucked into the waist at the back. This allows free movement while covering the legs.

- Bengali and Odia style.

- Gujarati/Rajasthani/Pakistani – after tucking in the pleats similar to the nivi style, the loose end is taken from the back, draped across the right shoulder, and pulled across to be secured in the back

- Maharashtrian/Konkani/Kashta; this drape is very similar to that of the male Maharashtrian dhoti. The centre of the sari (held lengthwise) is placed at the centre back, the ends are brought forward and tied securely, then the two ends are wrapped around the legs. When worn as a sari, an extra-long cloth of nine yards is used and the ends are then passed up over the shoulders and the upper body. They are primarily worn by Brahmin women of Maharashtra, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Goa.

- Madisar – this drape is typical of Iyengar/Iyer Brahmin ladies from Tamil Nadu. Traditional Madisar is worn using 9 yards saree.

- Kodagu style – this drape is confined to ladies hailing from the Kodagu district of Karnataka. In this style, the pleats are created in the rear, instead of the front. The loose end of the sari is draped back-to-front over the right shoulder, and is pinned to the rest of the sari.

- Gobbe Seere – This style is worn by women in the Malnad or Sahyadri and central region of Karnataka. It is worn with 18 molas saree with three four rounds at the waist and a knot after crisscrossing over shoulders.

- Gond – sari styles found in many parts of Central India. The cloth is first draped over the left shoulder, then arranged to cover the body.

- Malayali style – the two-piece sari, or Mundum Neryathum, worn in Kerala. Usually made of unbleached cotton and decorated with gold or coloured stripes and/or borders. Also the Kerala sari, a sort of mundum neryathum.

- Tribal styles – often secured by tying them firmly across the chest, covering the breasts.

 

Kunbi style or denthli:Goan Gauda and Kunbis,and those of them who have migrated to other states use this way of draping Sari or Kappad, this form of draping is created by tying a knot in the fabric below the shoulder and a strip of cloth which crossed the left shoulder was fasten on the back.

 

NIVI STYLE

The nivi is today's most popular sari style from Andhra Pradesh. The increased interaction with the British saw most women from royal families come out of purdah in the 1900s. This necessitated a change of dress. Maharani Indira Devi of Cooch Behar popularised the chiffon sari. She was widowed early in life and followed the convention of abandoning her richly woven Baroda shalus in favour of the traditional unadorned white. Characteristically, she transformed her "mourning" clothes into high fashion. She had saris woven in France to her personal specifications, in white chiffon, and introduced the silk chiffon sari to the royal fashion repertoire.

 

The chiffon sari did what years of fashion interaction had not done in India. It homogenised fashion across this land. Its softness, lightness and beautiful, elegant, caressing drape was ideally suited to the Indian climate. Different courts adopted their own styles of draping and indigenising the sari. In most of the courts the sari was embellished with stitching hand-woven borders in goldfrom Varanasi, delicate zardozi work, gota, makaish and tilla work that embellished the plain fabric, simultaneously satisfying both traditional demands and ingrained love for ornamentation. Some images of maharanis in the Deccan show the women wearing a sleeveless, richly embellished waistcoat over their blouses. The Begum of Savanur remembers how sumptuous the chiffon sari became at their gatherings. At some courts it was worn with jaali, or net kurtas and embossed silk waist length sadris or jackets. Some of them were so rich that the entire ground was embroidered over with pearls and zardozi.

 

Nivi drape starts with one end of the sari tucked into the waistband of the petticoat, usually a plain skirt. The cloth is wrapped around the lower body once, then hand-gathered into even pleats below the navel. The pleats are tucked into the waistband of the petticoat. They create a graceful, decorative effect which poets have likened to the petals of a flower. After one more turn around the waist, the loose end is draped over the shoulder. The loose end is called the pallu, pallav, seragu, or paita depending on the language. It is draped diagonally in front of the torso. It is worn across the right hip to over the left shoulder, partly baring the midriff. The navel can be revealed or concealed by the wearer by adjusting the pallu, depending on the social setting. The long end of the pallu hanging from the back of the shoulder is often intricately decorated. The pallu may be hanging freely, tucked in at the waist, used to cover the head, or used to cover the neck, by draping it across the right shoulder as well. Some nivi styles are worn with the pallu draped from the back towards the front, coming from the back over the right shoulder with one corner tucked by the left hip, covering the torso/waist. The nivi sari was popularised through the paintings of Raja Ravi Varma. In one of his paintings, the Indian subcontinent was shown as a mother wearing a flowing nivi sari. The ornaments generally accepted by the Hindu culture that can be worn in the midriff region are the waist chains. They are considered to be a part of bridal jewellery.

 

PROFESSIONAL STYLE OF DRAPING

Because of the harsh extremes in temperature on the Indian Subcontinent, the sari fills a practical role as well as a decorative one. It is not only warming in winter and cooling in summer, but its loose-fitting tailoring is preferred by women who must be free to move as their duties require. For this reason, it is the clothing of choice of air hostesses on Air India. This led to a professional style of draping a sari which is referred to "Air-Hostess style sari". An air hostess style sari is tied in just the same way as a normal sari except that the pleats are held together quite nicely with the help of pins. A bordered sari will be just perfect for an Air-Hostess style drape where the pallu is heavily pleated and pinned on the shoulder. Even the vertical pleats that are tucked at the navel are severely pleated and pressed. Same goes for the pallu pleats that are pinned at the shoulder. To get the perfect "Air-hostess" a complimentary U-shaped blouse that covers the upper body completely is worn which gives a very elegant and formal look. Mastering the "Air-hostess" style drape helps to create the desired impact in a formal setting like an interview or a conference.

 

Saris are worn as uniforms by the female hotel staff of many five star luxury hotels in India as symbol of culture. Recently, in a makeover design, Taj Hotels Resorts and Palaces, decided the welcoming staff at the group's Luxury Hotels would be draped in the rich colours and designs of the Banarasi six yards. The new saris were unveiled at the Taj property in Mumbai. It will be subsequently replicated at all 10 Luxury Hotels of the group across the country for duty managers and front office staff. Taj had adopted three villages in Varanasi and employed 25 master weavers there for the project. The vision finally took shape after 14 months, once the weavers had a good work environment, understood the designs and fine-tuned the motifs.

 

Similarly, the female politicians of India wear the sari in a professional manner. The women of Nehru–Gandhi family like Indira Gandhi and Sonia Gandhi wear the special blouse for the campaign trail which is longer than usually and is tucked in to prevent any midriff show while waving to the crowds.Stylist Prasad Bidapa has to say, "I think Sonia Gandhi is the country's most stylish politician. But that's because she's inherited the best collection of saris from her mother-in-law. I'm also happy that she supports the Indian handloom industry with her selection." BJP politician Sushma Swaraj maintains her prim housewife look with a pinned-up pallu while general secretary of AIADMK Jayalalithaa wears her saris like a suit of armour.

 

SARIS IN INDIAN LAW

In 2014, an Indian family court in Mumbai ruled that a husband objecting to his wife wearing a kurta and jeans and forcing her to wear a sari amounts to cruelty inflicted by the husband and can be a ground to seek divorce. The wife was thus granted a divorce on the ground of cruelty as defined under section 27(1)(d) of Special Marriage Act, 1954.

 

BANGLADESH

Sharee or saree (in Bengali=শাড়ি) is the national wear of Bangladeshi women. Most women who are married wear sharee as their regular dress while young-unmarried girls wear sharee as an occasional dress. The shari is worn by women throughout Bangladesh. Sari is the most popular dress for women in Bangladesh, both for casual and formal occasion. Although Dhakai Jamdani (hand made shari) is worldwide known and most famous to all women who wear shari but there are also many variety of shari in Bangladesh.There are many regional variations of them in both silk and cotton. e.g.- Tanta/Tant cotton shari, Dhakai Benaroshi shari, Rajshahi silk shari, Tangail Tanter shari, Tassar silk shari, monipuri shari and Katan shari are the most popular in Bangladesh.

 

PAKISTAN

In Pakistan, the sarees are still popular and worn on special occasions. The Shalwar kameez, however, is worn throughout the country on a daily basis. The sari nevertheless remains a popular garment among the middle and upper class for many formal functions. Sarees can be seen worn commonly in metropolitan cities such as Karachi and Islamabad and are worn regularly to weddings and other business type of functions. Sarees are also worn by many Muslim women in Sindh to show their status or to enhance their beauty. The sari is worn as daily wear by Pakistani Hindus, by elderly Muslim women who were used to wearing it in pre-partition India and by some of the new generation who have reintroduced the interest in saris.

 

SRI LANKA

Sri Lankan women wear saris in many styles. Two ways of draping the sari are popular and tend to dominate: the Indian style (classic nivi drape) and the Kandyan style (or osaria in Sinhalese). The Kandyan style is generally more popular in the hill country region of Kandy from which the style gets its name. Though local preferences play a role, most women decide on style depending on personal preference or what is perceived to be most flattering for their figure.

 

The traditional Kandyan (osaria) style consists of a full blouse which covers the midriff completely and is partially tucked in at the front as is seen in this 19th-century portrait. However, modern intermingling of styles has led to most wearers baring the midriff. The final tail of the sari is neatly pleated rather than free-flowing. This is rather similar to the pleated rosette used in the Dravidian style noted earlier in the article.

 

The Kandyan style is considered the national dress of Sinhalese women. It is the uniform of the air hostesses of SriLankan Airlines.

 

During the 1960s, the mini sari known as 'hipster' sari created a wrinkle in Sri Lankan fashion, since it was worn below the navel and barely above the line of prosecution for indecent exposure. The conservative people described the 'hipster' as "an absolute travesty of a beautiful costume almost a desecration" and "a hideous and purposeless garment".

 

NEPAL

The sari is the most commonly worn women's clothing in Nepal. In Nepal, a special style of sari draping is called haku patasihh. The sari is draped around the waist and a shawl is worn covering the upper half of the sari, which is used in place of a pallu.

 

AFGHANISTAN

Sari's have been worn by the Afghan royal family house and upper family classes as well by Muslim women at special functions.

 

SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES WITH OTHER ASIAN CLOTHING

While the sari is typical to Indian traditional wear, clothing worn by South-East Asian countries like Burma, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore resemble it, where a long rectangular piece of cloth is draped around the body. These are different from the sari as they are wrapped around the lower-half of body as a skirt, worn with a shirt/blouse, resembling a sarong, as seen in the Burmese Longyi, Filipino Malong, Tapis, Laotian Xout lao, Thai Sinh's, and Timorese Tais. Saris, worn predominantly in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Nepal are usually draped with one end of the cloth fastened around the waist, and the other end placed over the shoulder baring the midriff.

 

SAREE ORNAMENTATION AND DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES

Saris are woven with one plain end (the end that is concealed inside the wrap), two long decorative borders running the length of the sari, and a one to three-foot section at the other end which continues and elaborates the length-wise decoration. This end is called the pallu; it is the part thrown over the shoulder in the nivi style of draping.

 

In past times, saris were woven of silk or cotton. The rich could afford finely woven, diaphanous silk saris that, according to folklore, could be passed through a finger ring. The poor wore coarsely woven cotton saris. All saris were handwoven and represented a considerable investment of time or money.

 

Simple hand-woven villagers' saris are often decorated with checks or stripes woven into the cloth. Inexpensive saris were also decorated with block printing using carved wooden blocks and vegetable dyes, or tie-dyeing, known in India as bhandani work.

 

More expensive saris had elaborate geometric, floral, or figurative ornaments or brocades created on the loom, as part of the fabric. Sometimes warp and weft threads were tie-dyed and then woven, creating ikat patterns. Sometimes threads of different colours were woven into the base fabric in patterns; an ornamented border, an elaborate pallu, and often, small repeated accents in the cloth itself. These accents are called buttis or bhuttis (spellings vary). For fancy saris, these patterns could be woven with gold or silver thread, which is called zari work.

 

Sometimes the saris were further decorated, after weaving, with various sorts of embroidery. Resham work is embroidery done with coloured silk thread. Zardozi embroidery uses gold and silver thread, and sometimes pearls and precious stones. Cheap modern versions of zardozi use synthetic metallic thread and imitation stones, such as fake pearls and Swarovski crystals.

 

In modern times, saris are increasingly woven on mechanical looms and made of artificial fibres, such as polyester, nylon, or rayon, which do not require starching or ironing. They are printed by machine, or woven in simple patterns made with floats across the back of the sari. This can create an elaborate appearance on the front, while looking ugly on the back. The punchra work is imitated with inexpensive machine-made tassel trim.

 

Hand-woven, hand-decorated saris are naturally much more expensive than the machine imitations. While the overall market for handweaving has plummeted (leading to much distress among Indian handweavers), hand-woven saris are still popular for weddings and other grand social occasions.

 

SARI OUTSIDE SOUTH ASIA

The traditional sari made an impact in the United States during the 1970s. Eugene Novack who ran the New York store, Royal Saree House told that he had been selling it mainly to the Indian women in New York area but later many American business women and housewives became his customers who preferred their saris to resemble the full gown of the western world. He also said that men appeared intrigued by the fragility and the femininity it confers on the wearer. Newcomers to the sari report that it is comfortable to wear, requiring no girdles or stockings and that the flowing garb feels so feminine with unusual grace.

 

As a nod to the fashion-forward philosophy established by the designs of Emilio Pucci, the now-defunct Braniff International Airways envisioned their air hostesses wearing a more revealing version of a sari on a proposed Dallas-Bombay (conceivably via London) service in the late 1970s. However this was never realised because of Halston's resistance to working with a palette outside of his comfort zone. The former Eagan, Minnesota–based Northwest Airlines considered issuing saris to flight attendants working the Minneapolis-Amsterdam-Delhi route that began in the 1990s. This never occurred largely because of a union dispute.

 

The sari has gained its popularity internationally because of the growth of Indian fashion trends globally. Many Bollywood celebrities, like Aishwarya Rai,[48] have worn it at international events representing the Indian culture. In 2010, Bollywood actress Deepika Padukone wanted to represent her country at an international event, wearing the national costume. On her very first red carpet appearance at the Cannes International Film Festival, she stepped out on the red carpet in a Rohit Bal sari.

 

Even popular Hollywood celebrities have worn this traditional attire. Pamela Anderson made a surprise guest appearance on Bigg Boss, the Indian version of Big Brother, dressed in a sari that was specially designed for her by Mumbai-based fashion designer Ashley Rebello. Ashley Judd donned a purple sari at the Youth AIDS Benefit Gala in November 2007 at the Ritz Carlton in Mclean, Virginia. There was an Indian flavour to the red carpet at the annual Fashion Rocks concert in New York, with designer Rocky S walking the ramp along with Jessica, Ashley, Nicole, Kimberly and Melody – the Pussycat Dolls – dressed in saris.

 

TYPES

While an international image of the modern style sari may have been popularised by airline stewardesses, each region in the Indian subcontinent has developed, over the centuries, its own unique sari style. Following are other well-known varieties, distinct on the basis of fabric, weaving style, or motif, in South Asia:

 

CENTRAL STYLES

Chanderi Sari – Madhya Pradesh

Maheshwari – Maheshwar, Madhya Pradesh

Kosa Silk – Chhattisgarh

Dhokra Silk – Madhya Pradesh

 

EASTERN STYLES

Tangail Tant Saree – Bangladesh

Jamdani – Bangladesh

Muslin – Bangladesh

Rajshahi Silk (Eri Silk) – Bangladesh

Tussar Silk Saree – Rajshahi Bangladesh

Dhakai Katan – Bangladesh

Khadi Saree – Comilla Bangladesh

Jute Cotton – Bangladesh

Mooga Silk – Assam

Mekhla Cotton – Assam

Dhaniakhali Cotton – West Bengal

Shantipuri Cotton – Shantipur, West Bengal

Phulia Cotton – Phulia, West Bengal

Begumpur Cotton – Begumpur, West Bengal

Garad Saree (Korial) – Murshidabad, West Bengal

Tant Saree – Farshganj, West Bengal

Murshidabad Silk – West Bengal

Baluchari Silk – Bishnupur, Bankura West Bengal

Kantha Silk & Cotton Saree – West Bengal & Bangladesh

Batic Saree – West Bengal & Bangladesh

Sambalpuri Silk & Cotton Saree – Sambalpur, Odisha

Bomkai Silk & Cotton Saree – Bomkai, Ganjam, Odisha

Khandua Silk & Cotton Saree – Nuapatna, Cuttack, Odisha

Sonepuri Silk & Cotton Saree – Subarnapur, Odisha

Berhampuri Silk – Behrampur, Odisha

Mattha Silk Saree – Mayurbhanj, Odisha

Bapta Silk & Cotton Saree – Koraput, Odisha

Tanta Cotton Saree – Balasore, Odisha

Manipuri Tant Saree - Manipur

 

WESTERN STYLES

Paithani – Maharashtra

Bandhani – Gujarat, Rajasthan, Pakistan

Kota doria – Rajasthan, Pakistan

Lugade – Maharashtra

Patola – Gujarat, Pakistan

 

SOUTHERN STYLES

Mysore Silk – Karnataka

Ilkal Saree – Karnataka

Molakalmuru Sari – Karnataka

Venkatagiri – Andhra Pradesh

Mangalagiri Silk Sarees – Andhra Pradesh

Uppada Silk Sarees – Andhra Pradesh

Chirala Sarees – Andhra Pradesh

Bandar Sarees – Andhra Pradesh

Bandarulanka – Andhra Pradesh

Kuppadam Sarees – Andhra Pradesh

Dharmavaram Silk Saree – Andhra pradesh

Kanchipuram Sari (locally called Kanjivaram Pattu) – Tamil Nadu

Kumbakonam – Tamil Nadu

Thirubuvanam – Tamil Nadu

Coimbatore Cotton Tamil Nadu

Chinnalampattu or Sungudi Tamil Nadu

Balarampuram – Kerala

Mundum Neriyathum – Kerala

Mayilati Silk – Kerala

Kannur Cotton – Kerala

Kalpathi Silk Sarees – Kerala

Maradaka Silk – Kerala

Samudrikapuram Silk and Cotton – Kerala

Pochampally Sari or Puttapaka Sari – Telangana

Gadwal Sari – Telangana

Narayanpet – Telangana or Maharashtra

 

NORTHERN STYLES

Banarasi – Uttar Pradesh

Shalu – Uttar Pradesh

Tanchoi – Uttar Pradesh

Bagru – Rajasthan, Pakistan

 

WIKIPEDIA

Paul Shoaway, Umatilla Indian, Washington, 1899

 

Photographer:

La Roche, Frank

 

Subjects (LCSH):

Showaway, Paul

Portraits--Washington (State)

Umatilla Indians--Clothing & dress

 

Digital Collection:

Frank La Roche Photograph Collection

content.lib.washington.edu/larocheweb/index.html

 

Item Number: LAR130

 

Persistent URL:

content.lib.washington.edu/u?/laroche,6

 

Visit Special Collections reproductions and rights page for information on ordering a copy.

 

University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections content.lib.washington.edu/

  

Fire Lightning, about 1891, wearing bone breastplate, a Euro-American coat, and two feathers in hair.

 

Original by C.M. Bell of Washington DC. Library of Congress, Subject Heading: Dakota Indians, clothing and dress, 1890-1900 and Indians of North America, clothing and dress, 1890-1900.

Fire Lightning, about 1891, wearing bone breastplate, a Euro-American coat, and two feathers in hair.

 

Original by C.M. Bell of Washington DC. Library of Congress, Subject Heading: Dakota Indians, clothing and dress, 1890-1900 and Indians of North America, clothing and dress, 1890-1900.

A woman hangs out her clean laundry to dry in the sun on her roof in the City of Agra, India, close to the Taj Mahal.

 

If you want to look at more of my photography you can check my website and social media links below:

 

www.geraintrowland.co.uk

 

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Some of my India Travel Photos on Getty Images

 

Two colourful local women walk past two resting white goats in the streets of Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India.

 

Taken with a Canon 5D4 and a 50mm 1.4 lens, edited in Lightroom.

 

If you want to look at more of my photography you can check my website and social media links below:

 

www.geraintrowland.co.uk

 

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India Street Photography on Getty

During the search of equilibrium in this city of stability and happiness, I was drawn into this empty old shopping mall which have knitting shop, Indian clothing shops and local Singaporean coffee shops. Can you spot me??

 

Pentax Spotmatic, Fujifilm Natura 1600

Candid street portrait, Fort Kochi, Kerala, India.

 

A blog about photography in Fort Kochi

 

If you would like to use any of my photos please contact me and ask permission first.

 

If you want to look at more of my photography you can check my website and social media links below:

 

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Indian culture exhibition at the Duman Entertainment Center in Astana

3rd excerpt from the Saree/Indian clothing photoshoot. I'm done editing this session so'll share more with you guys very soon.

 

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3eme extrait de mon photoshoot avec des saree/vêtements indiens. J'ai fini mon editing se cette session donc il va y en avoir plus à venir!

  

Model: Shrabani Debroy

MUA: Stephanie Guida

Stylists & Assistants: Smita Deychoudhury, Sharna Dey and Suma Das

Wardrobe by: Puja Saree

 

Lighting info

One Light Setup

Key light: 430EX with 1/2 CTO gel @ 1/4 Power in a 43" Westcott Apollo Orb, camera left @8:00.

 

Triggered by Pixel Pawn

Canon 5D MKII + EF 85MM F1.8 | F2 | 1/50 | Iso 400

 

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Your comments and favs are always appreciated!

In the history of Indian clothing the sari is traced back to the Indus Valley Civilization, which flourished during 2800–1800 BC around the western part of the Indian subcontinent. The earliest known depiction of the sari in the Indian subcontinent is the statue of an Indus Valley priest wearing a drape. ~wikipedia

All rights reserved.

Chiapas is the poorest and some say the most beautiful state of Mexico. Chiapas was conquered by Spain in the early 16th century, and became part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain, administered as part of the Captaincy General of Guatemala (what is now Central America), from Santiago de Guatemala.

 

When Central America achieved independence from Mexico in 1823, western Chiapas was annexed to Mexico. More of current day Chiapas was transferred after the disintegration of the Central American Federation in 1842. The remainder of the current state taken from Guatemala in the early 1880s by President Porfirio Díaz.

 

Chiapas remained one of the parts of Mexico least affected by change, with the descendants of the Spanish continuing to control indigenous peoples through such institutions as debt peonage, despite attempts by the central government to abolish those practices.

 

In 1868, an armed native rebellion, led by the Tzotzil Maya, and also including Tzeltal, Tojolabal, and Ch’ol, nearly captured San Cristóbal, then the state capital, before it was suppressed by the Mexican army.

 

In the late 20th century, indigenous peasant farmers felt that their poor and largely agricultural region had been too long ignored by the Mexican government. A chief complaint was that many indigenous farmers were required to pay absentee landlords,[citation needed] despite repeated government promises of agrarian reform. Article 27 of the constitution of 1917 guaranteed indigenous peoples the right to an ejido or communal land. After the financial crisis of 1982, Mexico restructured its economy and de-prioritized land reform (long since completed in most of the country). The government of President Carlos Salinas de Gortari sought to liberalize Mexico’s closed economy. As part of this process, Mexico repealed the constitutional guarantee of communally owned ejidos for rural communities. As the North American Free Trade Agreement came into effect on in 1994, indigenous Chiapanecos felt increasingly left behind.

Such disaffection led to the rise of the Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN, “Zapatista National Liberation Army”, commonly called the Zapatistas), which began an armed rebellion against the federal government on January 1, 1994 as a response to the implementation of the NAFTA. Zapatista rebels are mostly Tzotzil and some Tzeltal Maya, from the central highlands of the state, and the group’s spokesman, the Sub-Comandante Marcos, gained it international attention.

 

The group is named after Emiliano Zapata, iconic general in the Mexican Revolution of 1910, who is lionized for having defended the rights of poor farmers. Although the EZLN was in principle a peaceful movement forced to arms by the Mexican government, to guarantee the right to ejidos, there were a number of violent episodes in its history. The movement began in 1994 with the seizure of four cities (most notably San Cristóbal de las Casas), over 600 ranches, and control over about a quarter of the state.

 

After pushing the Zapatistas out of San Cristóbal, the Mexican army kept them bottled up in their jungle strongholds, cutting them off economically and politically. The Mexican government installed a solidarity program which while “ostensibly designed to alleviate poverty, instead became an instrument for rewarding political loyalty and contributed to the anger and frustration expressed through the Zapatista rebellion.”In 1996, both sides signed a peace accord.

 

Meanwhile, landowner-funded paramilitaries sporadically repressed indigenous communities. A series of massacres ensued, typified by the 1997 Acteal massacre, where 47 indigenous refugees, mainly women and children, were killed in a church.

 

In 2000, the EZLN renewed its resistance, autonomizing a number of jungle villages and sending a delegation to Mexico City. While the delegation did not obtain everything it sought, despite some support from president Vicente Fox, the villages remain under Zapatista control. In August 2003, the EZLN declared all Zapatista territory an autonomous government independent of the Mexican state.

 

The armed EZLN has mostly eschewed armed conflict, in favor of political efforts to build health clinics and schools in their communities. Anti-Zapatista paramilitary and military activity continues on the part of the Mexican government, however, threatening of re-escalation Zapatista action continues now with the implementation of the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle and the launching of The Other Campaign.

 

Week 27

 

Few weeks ago I saw a casting call on ModelMayhem where a model was looking for a photographer for a Saree/Indian clothing photoshoot. I decided to reply as it looked like a lot of fun.

 

Well, it was a lot of fun indeed!

Shrabani (the model that published the casting call) set up everything. We had 2 models, a makeup artist, some wardrobe and a couple of wardrobe stylists who assisted me during this photoshoot. Life was easy on this one.

 

We shot 2 styles for each model so we had the opportunity to have some various type of shots.

The whole team was really friendly so it was real pleasure to work with them.

 

For this shot I had one of the stylist holding an gold reflector to warm the scene. I'm glad they were there and happy to help because it was pretty windy!

It was supposed to rain that day but it was sunny during our shoot so I left the flash in the bag as long as the ambiant light was strong enough.

 

Enjoy the Week!

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Semaine 27

 

Il y a quelques semaines, J'ai vu une annonce sur ModelMayhem pour lequel un photographe était recherché pour un photoshoot avec des saree/vêtements indiens. J'ai décidé de me proposer vu que ça avait d'être assez fun comme truc.

 

Eh bien c'était effectivement super fun!

Shrabani (la modèle qui avait publié l'annonce) a tout organisé. On avait 2 modèles, une maquilleuse, plusieurs vêtements et un trio de stylistes qui m'ont également servi d'assistantes durant ce photoshoot. Bref, la vie m'a été facilitée sur ce coup.

 

On a shooté 2 styles différents par modèle du coup on a pu avoir des looks différents.

Tout l'équipe était vraiment amicale, l'ambiance était super et c'était donc très agréable de travailler avec elles.

 

Pour cette image, j'avais une des stylistes qui tenait un réflecteur doré histoire de réchauffer la scène. Je suis bien content qu'elle soient restée et qu'elles aient été contentes donner un coup de main parcequ'encore une fois il y avait pas mal de vent!

Il était censé pleuvoir ce jour là mais on au final on a eu un beau soleil le temps de la séance alors j'ai laissé le flash dans le sac tant qu'on avait assez de lumière.

 

Passez une bonne semaine!

 

Model: Shrabani Debroy

MUA: Stephanie Guida

Stylists & Assistant: Smita Deychoudhury, Sharna Dey and Suma Das

Wardrobe by: Puja Saree

 

Lighting info

Key light: 42" Gold Reflector held by Assistant camera right

Rim light: Sun at dusk

 

Canon 5D MKII + EF 135MM F2 L | F2.8 | 1/640 | Iso 100

 

Lighting Diagram

 

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Your comments and favs are always appreciated!

Our second holiday in the village of Charco del Palo on Lanzarote. Heather bought this flimsy slit-sided rather see-through cotton shirt in a shop selling Indian clothing in Costa Teguise. She wore it around the village as a micro dress and, rather daringly, into town. It finally fell to pieces in 2014. Sadly the shop has closed down and she hasn't been able to find a replacement anywhere near as nice. Perhaps next year?

 

This reminds me of another brief slit-sided outfit she wore nearly 50 years ago when we were camping in the New Forest. A style that seems to suit her, despite the passage of a lot of time!

2nd excerpt from the Saree/Indian clothing photoshoot with the 2nd Model: Suzanne.

Back to my basics on this one with my beloved speedlites. Lol

 

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2eme extrait de mon photoshoot avec des saree/vêtements indiens avec ici la 2e modèle Suzanne.

De retour à mes fondamentaux sur celle-là avec mes chers speedlites. Lol

  

Model: Suzanne Dytynyshyn

MUA: Stephanie Guida

Stylists & Assistant: Smita Deychoudhury, Sharna Dey and Suma Das

Wardrobe by: Puja Saree

 

Lighting info

One Light Setup

Key light: 430EX with 1/2 CTO gel @ 1/4 Power in a 43" Westcott Apollo Orb, camera left @8:00.

 

Triggered by Pixel Pawn

Canon 5D MKII + EF 85MM F1.8 | F2.8 | 1/100 | Iso 100

 

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Your comments and favs are always appreciated!

latest designer indian clothing from indian by zarilane.com

Card received from Sania (Antonina) in 18/03/2008 - Canada.

(Traditional Clothing Tag)

Ghost sign for Modern Saree Centre, 22 Princelet Street, London, England. A former Indian clothing store in a Georgian terraced house built by Samuel Worrall circa 1721.

I always wanted a chance to practice some ideas I had in regards to photography. One was to photograph a young Indian woman sitting by herself, in peaceful solitude playing a sitar. I was at an Indian clothing shop looking for jewelry in case I had the chance to do such a project and had the good fortune of finding this beautiful young Indian woman who happened to work at the shop. I told Saba, her name, the idea for my photo project and she graciously agreed to pose for this shot. It was taken with a Mamiya RB-67 using Vericolor (long out of production) film. I also added an 81B warming filter to enhance the brown tones and give her skin more warmth. The light source was a single studio strobe shot through a softbox to give more direction to the light instead of scattering the it as an umbrella would do.

I made the sad little wig for him. It will do though. After all, whos looking at the wig?

fantastic Indian clothing made by Wolf aka Guy Blair

On October 6th, 2007 Denver Colorado celebrated(?) it's 100th anniversary of the Columbus Day parade. For about 20 years, since the parade was revived by local Italian Americans, American Indians have protested the event. They contend that Christopher Columbus was a slave trader and the catalyst to the genocide of their people.

 

Italian Americans view this as a day to celebrate their heritage. I saw only a few references to Columbus. Mostly folks in nice cars or on cool motorcycles waving U.S. and Italian flags.

The American Indians want the name changed.

Some states have changed the name of the day to Indigenous Peoples Day but I'm not sure that would work here because the Italian Americans have been having this parade for years.

 

So this is how it all went down. The protesters showed up at the Denver capital building several hours before the parade. Protesting and drumming, some in traditional American Indian clothing. Amazing workmanship and detail.

 

In the past, protesters and police had spoken beforehand about "how things would go", trying to keep things peaceful.

Going as far as planning arrests. Not this year.

Interestingly enough the leader of the anti Columbus Day group "Transform Columbus Day Alliance" is Glenn Spagnuolo, that's right Spagnuolo.

When confronted with the permits needed, Glenn stated

"We don't need a permit, because we are on native land."

www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_...

and

"Asking an illegal colonizer for permission to be on land that doesn't belong to them doesn't work for us,"

www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_...

  

Another group well represented was the American Indian Movement of Colorado. Ex and current Colorado University professors Ward Churchill and Glenn Morris are leaders of this group. Well known Russel Means is also a member, having left the main chapter of AIM.

www.russellmeans.com/aim.html

www.coloradoaim.org/

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Indian_Movement_of_Colorado

 

The American Indian Movement of Colorado is not affiliated with the American Indian Movement. View their stance here

www.aimovement.org/

aimgrandgovcouncil.blogspot.com/

 

So they followed their own route, from the capital through downtown Denver, on their way to come head to head with the Italians and their parade. They have always been peaceful and they vowed that today would be the same.

However, they had grown tired of years of words and seeing no actions.

 

When the protest met the parade, emotions ran deep and blood spilled through the streets. Not real blood however, but fake blood spilled by the protesters along with dismembered dolls. Many protesters sat in the street, stopping the parade from starting. Russell Means and Glenn Morris included. All were arrested. Nobody fought, but they did resist their arrests.

 

After this initial push by the protesters, the parade went on....a little off schedule. At this point it was lots of yelling and verbal abuse. Protesters yelling at cops and Italians. Italians, including 80 year old ladies and teenage kids, cursing and flipping the bird at protesters. Police officers, staring through mirrored sunglasses with rubber bullet guns, flashing dirty looks at everyone.

 

After the parade had traveled a few blocks, a group of young American Indians wearing bandannas over their faces made their stand and sat in the middle of the road. About 20 cops jumped on top of them and promptly pulled them apart and arrested them. The protesters didn't fight, but they did use each other as weight, locking their arms together. One of them came up bloody.

 

After this, the parade continued and the protesters headed back to the capital to spread the word. 83 protesters taken away on police buses by the time the parade was over.

   

Personally, I have no vested interest here. I'm not American Indian or Italian American. I do believe that what happened to the native people of this land is horrible. If I was Native American, after years of persecution of my people, I would probably be tired of words and lies too. However I don't have anything against Italian Americans either and I doubt their ancestors had more to do with Indian genocide than any of the other European countries that settled in the United States.

 

I think the city of Denver needs to get off their butts and do something about it. How hard is it to change the name of the parade to Italian Heritage Day or whatever and out of respect to the American Indians, have another day for them. How hard is that? 20 years, really?

 

I also realize the city is planning for the Democratic National Convention but was the show of force necessary, for a group that has maintained their peaceful approach?

A little overkill if you ask me, but then again this is a post 9/11 world, and everyone could be a terrorist.

www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1096409698

   

I think it's interesting that a woman and black man helped arrest this man. 3 groups who have seen their share of persecution in the United States.

My friend designs sarees & handbags and has her own little startup company for the same. Over the months I've seen the photos which she was putting up and they really weren't doing any justice. So on Sunday I got my girlfriend to model a few of her designs and let me do the shoot.

No tripod, no lights/strobes, no reflectors, no location. Simply done at my friend's house. We did move the furniture around a bit :P

 

Note: (wiki definition: A sari or saree, is an Indian and Bangladeshi female garment that consists of drape varying from two to nine yards in length and two to four feet in breadth that is typically wrapped around the waist, with one end draped over the shoulder, baring the midriff.)

Princess of India™ Barbie® doll is awe-inspiring in her sari, the best-known type of Indian clothing. Made of soft shimmering materials, this extraordinary pink sari features golden accents and is draped around her body and over her head in an intricate style. Like some princesses, she wears a golden headpiece called a tikka, a forehead ornament. The tikka hangs above her bindi, the dot on her forehead. A golden choker and earrings complete this wonderful costume.

Golden Landmark, an old shopping mall shattered with Singaporean coffee shops, Indian clothing retails and knitting shops, is perhaps one of the few places I love in Singapore. Without any glamorous loud and noisy signatory tourism attraction, this old arcade preserves the sense of local neighborhood and authentic collective memory of Singapore amid the reconstruction of modern Singapore through giant shopping mall and well- polished architecture.

 

Pentax Spotmatic, Fujifilm Natura 1600.

Nez Perce Indian, Washington, 1899

 

Photographer:

La Roche, Frank

 

Subjects (LCSH):

Portraits-Washington (State)

Nez Perce Indians--Clothing & dress

 

Digital Collection:

Frank La Roche Photograph Collection

content.lib.washington.edu/larocheweb/index.html

 

Item Number: LAR127

 

Persistent URL:

content.lib.washington.edu/u?/laroche,165

 

Visit Special Collections reproductions and rights page for information on ordering a copy.

 

University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections content.lib.washington.edu/

  

Princess of India™ Barbie® doll is awe-inspiring in her sari, the best-known type of Indian clothing. Made of soft shimmering materials, this extraordinary pink sari features golden accents and is draped around her body and over her head in an intricate style. Like some princesses, she wears a golden headpiece called a tikka, a forehead ornament. The tikka hangs above her bindi, the dot on her forehead. A golden choker and earrings complete this wonderful costume.

Princess of India™ Barbie® doll is awe-inspiring in her sari, the best-known type of Indian clothing. Made of soft shimmering materials, this extraordinary pink sari features golden accents and is draped around her body and over her head in an intricate style. Like some princesses, she wears a golden headpiece called a tikka, a forehead ornament. The tikka hangs above her bindi, the dot on her forehead. A golden choker and earrings complete this wonderful costume.

5th and last excerpt from the Saree/Indian clothing photoshoot.

You can see more on my Facebook Page if you want.

 

Have a great week-end!

 

--

 

5eme et dernier extrait de mon photoshoot avec des saree/vêtements indiens.

Vous pouvez en voir d'autres comme d'hab sur ma page facebook si le coeur vous en dit.

Passez un bon week-end et bonne fête nationales à mes amis flickr de France :)

  

Model: Shrabani Debroy

MUA: Stephanie Guida

Stylists & Assistants: Smita Deychoudhury, Sharna Dey and Suma Das

Wardrobe by: Puja Saree

 

Lighting info

Key light: 42" Gold Reflector held by Assistant camera right

Rim light: Sun at dusk

 

Canon 5D MKII + EF 135MM L | F2 | 1/1250 | Iso 100

 

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Your comments and favs are always appreciated!

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