new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged indian+embroideries

Free download under CC Attribution ( CC BY 4.0). Please credit the artist and rawpixel.com.

 

Higher resolutions with no attribution required can be downloaded: www.rawpixel.com/category/public_domain

Identifier: principlesofdeco00dresuoft

Title: Principles of decorative design

Year: 1870 (1870s)

Authors: Dresser, Christopher

Subjects: Decoration and ornament Decoration and ornament

Publisher: London New York : Cassell Petter & Galpin

Contributing Library: Dorothy H. Hoover Library, Ontario College of Art & Design

Digitizing Sponsor: The Ontario College of Art & Design

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

. This parti- cular class of ornamentforms the backgroundto many old pictures,a most interesting col-lection of which existsin the museum ofCologne, and is cer-tainly worthy of themost careful study. As to flat silkwall-damasks, whichare used in some ofthe ujjper-class housesas wall-paj)ers are usedin the middle-classhouses, all that needbe said is that theyshould be treated aswall decoiations, andnot as fabrics whichare to be seen folded.Were I asked whetherI approve of thesedamasks as wall cover-ings, I should say,Certainly not. A

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Fig. 94. wall is better treated as a wall, and not so covered with drapery as to leave spacefor vermin between the wall and its enrichment. There is also the further objectionthat the lines where the fabric is joined are visible, and these are most certainlyobjectionable. Besides the illustrations of German ornament just given, we figure also aspecimen of Indian embroidery on cotton (Pig. 94). I cannot too strongly recom-mend the designer of patterns for woven goods to study the native fabrics of India,exliibited at the Indian Museum, Whitehall. Besides the collection liere brought together, there is also in most of our INDIAN EMBROIDERY ON COTTON. 115 manufacturing towns a large series of specimens of these cloths deposited with theChamber of Commerce, and these can be consulted by all respectable members of the

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Here's another page I'm coloring from my upcoming Folk Art Coloring Book. This page was inspired by Rabari Bharat, the colorful embroidery of the Rabari people in western India. I was lucky to visit some villages in Rajasthan when I was 19, where I was mesmerized by the vibrant patterns and dazzling details of their textiles. They sew small round mirrors into their embroidery which makes them even more eye-popping. When I closed my eyes at night, I'd see these shapes and colors dancing through my mind. I greatly admire the diligence and creativity of those who create these time-consuming textiles, so it was a lot of fun to design a coloring page in honor of their handicraft. I'm coloring this page using pens and gel pens (specifically, Staedtler Triplus and Sakura Gelly Roll).

Jamie Malden hosts textile holidays to India, to explore and discover the colours and textile techniques of block printing and Indian embroidery first hand. Only come on a Colouricious Creative Holiday if you love textiles - you will have a wonderful trip with like minded people who also love textiles. to learn more, go to the Creative Holiday section on www.colouricious.com

Rabar Bharat (Indian embroidery) coloring page that I designed for my Folk Art Coloring Book and colored in with gel pens.

Jamie Malden hosts textile holidays to India, to explore and discover the colours and textile techniques of block printing and Indian embroidery first hand. Only come on a Colouricious Creative Holiday if you love textiles - you will have a wonderful trip with like minded people who also love textiles. to learn more, go to the Creative Holiday section on www.colouricious.com

Jamie Malden hosts textile holidays to India, to explore and discover the colours and textile techniques of block printing and Indian embroidery first hand. Only come on a Colouricious Creative Holiday if you love textiles - you will have a wonderful trip with like minded people who also love textiles. to learn more, go to the Creative Holiday section on www.colouricious.com

Jamie Malden hosts textile holidays to India, to explore and discover the colours and textile techniques of block printing and Indian embroidery first hand. Only come on a Colouricious Creative Holiday if you love textiles - you will have a wonderful trip with like minded people who also love textiles. to learn more, go to the Creative Holiday section on www.colouricious.com

Fabric from my colection of Indian embroidery work , then connect together with needle work.

Jamie Malden hosts textile holidays to India, to explore and discover the colours and textile techniques of block printing and Indian embroidery first hand. Only come on a Colouricious Creative Holiday if you love textiles - you will have a wonderful trip with like minded people who also love textiles. to learn more, go to the Creative Holiday section on www.colouricious.com

Jamie Malden hosts textile holidays to India, to explore and discover the colours and textile techniques of block printing and Indian embroidery first hand. Only come on a Colouricious Creative Holiday if you love textiles - you will have a wonderful trip with like minded people who also love textiles. to learn more, go to the Creative Holiday section on www.colouricious.com

Jamie Malden hosts textile holidays to India, to explore and discover the colours and textile techniques of block printing and Indian embroidery first hand. Only come on a Colouricious Creative Holiday if you love textiles - you will have a wonderful trip with like minded people who also love textiles. to learn more, go to the Creative Holiday section on www.colouricious.com

Identifier: marlboroughhouse00beav

Title: Marlborough house and its occupants, present and past

Year: 1896 (1890s)

Authors: Beavan, Arthur H. (Arthur Henry), 1844-1907

Subjects: Edward VII, King of Great Britain, 1841-1910 Marlborough House, London

Publisher: London : F. V. White

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

ncess of Wales.Here it is that dinners are given, when the partyconsists of more than four or five guests, yet is notsufficiently large to necessitate the use the principaldining-room. The walls are covered with maroon figured velvetof Eastern design, the windows being curtainedwith the same. On the floor are Indian carpetsand rugs. Chairs of carved English oak, uphol-stered in cloth of gold, brought by the Princefrom India, couches in the sam^ material, butsomewhat lighter in tone—exquisite colours on awhite ground—with cushions, as a rule partly con-cealed by gorgeous elephants housings of greenand gold velvet, are grouped about, and a largedivan in the centre covered with Indian embroidery,produces a distinctly Oriental effect. In the windows facing west, are glass-topped tables,full as they can hold of medals, keys, and trowels,chased and engraved. Should the Prince ever haveto earn his living as a mason, there are trowelsenough to serve not only for his lifetime, but for that

 

Text Appearing After Image:

I o c X <c X ft! *3 g Marlborough House. 31 of several generations to follow. All these objectsare, of course, mementoes of the laying of founda-tion-stones and the opening of public buildings. A particularly handsome vase, the gift of theCzar Alexander II. of Russia, stands near thesetrowels, on a pink marble pedestal; and, displayedin a prominent position, is a magnificent shield, saidto have cost .£20,000. In a corner of the room, covered by an elephantstrapping, is a horizontal grand piano in a rosewoodcase, by Brinsmead, presented to the Princess ofWales by the Grand Lodge of Freemasons in 1888.Upon it repose many cylinders of solid silver, con-taining addresses received by the Prince during hisIndian tour. How many such documents, elaborately engrossedand illuminated, recording the undying loyalty anddevotion of corporations, municipalities and publicbodies all over the kingdom, must not His RoyalHighness have received in the course of his life!—■all neatly packed in cas

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Jamie Malden hosts textile holidays to India, to explore and discover the colours and textile techniques of block printing and Indian embroidery first hand. Only come on a Colouricious Creative Holiday if you love textiles - you will have a wonderful trip with like minded people who also love textiles. to learn more, go to the Creative Holiday section on www.colouricious.com

Jamie Malden hosts textile holidays to India, to explore and discover the colours and textile techniques of block printing and Indian embroidery first hand. Only come on a Colouricious Creative Holiday if you love textiles - you will have a wonderful trip with like minded people who also love textiles. to learn more, go to the Creative Holiday section on www.colouricious.com

Kutch embroidery is a beautiful and heavily detailed form of Indian traditional embroidery which originates from the Kutch and the Saurashtra regions of Gujarat. This embroidery with its rich designs has made a notable contribution to the Indian embroidery traditions.

 

PROMO OFFER: marketplace.secondlife.com/p/Auralia-Inika-Top-Black-Mait...

 

INSL: maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Zelopian/211/129/1793

 

Inika Top comes in 11 variants with Copy and modify permissions.

These were two vintage Indian embroidery booklets that I got in a tiny Indian Habberdashery in mauritius .. the entire shop was about 20 x 10 meters and had 7 sales assistants working in it ... what a find!! if any one wants a copy let me know

These were two vintage Indian embroidery booklets that I got in a tiny Indian Habberdashery in mauritius .. the entire shop was about 20 x 10 meters and had 7 sales assistants working in it ... what a find!! if any one wants a copy let me know

marketplace.secondlife.com/p/99L-60Off-PromotionArisArisB...

 

PROMOTION ONLY 99L$

LIMITED QUANTITIES AT THIS PRICE

PROMO ONLY IN MARKET

 

REBEL CAPRIS:

 

You can never miss good jeans in your closet! All styles can be combined with a good pair of jeans, it depends on your imagination.

18 Modelos

With the most fashionable styles, precious lace stitched to the broken, random stitches or beautiful lace on the sides, broken colors or indian embroidery, Discover them!

 

Sizes:

 

3 - For Belleza: Freya, Isis, Venus

2 - For Slink: Physique and Hourglass

1 - For Maitreya

2 - For eBODY: Classic & Curvy

2 - For Tonic: Curvy & Fine

1 - For TMP

1 - Hud

 

Rigged, New Materials

 

The model in the pic, wearing a Maitreya mesh body (Lara)

 

Try the Outfit with any mesh body.

Indian embroidery by artisanne-textile

voir le blog www.artisanne-textile.fr

15 novembre 2016

Mango, the king of fruits is also the national fruit of India, available in plenty during summers.

The most famous of all the available mango varieties is the Alphonso, a small, yellow mango that is among the nation’s sweetest, costliest and the tastiest.

 

The mango is the national fruit of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and the Philippines.

There are said to be at least 1000 types of mango in India.

In Delhi they have a Mango fiar every year with some 550 varieties on display!

Bangalore has a fair in Lalbagh Gardensn every year as well, little smaller though.

 

In Hinduism, the perfectly ripe mango is often held by Lord Ganesha as a symbol of attainment, regarding the devotees potential perfection. Mango blossoms are also used in the worship of Goddess Saraswati.

 

Mango leaves are used to decorate archways and doors in Indian houses and during weddings and celebrations like Ganesh Chaturthi. Mango motifs and paisleys are widely used in different Indian embroidery styles and are found in Kashmiri shawls, Kanchipuram silk sarees etc. Paisleys are also common to Iranian art, because of its pre-Islamic Zoroastrian past.

 

In several cultures, its fruit and leaves are ritually used as floral decorations at weddings, public celebrations and religious ceremonies.

This was a custom order, refinishing a dresser than had been in my client's family for a long time. They requested that I incorporate Frida Kahlo in some way, and that I use some positive quotes that would be inspiring for their daughter, who will use the dresser.

  

This design was an attempt to recreate a beautiful portrait of Frida by the photographer Nickolas Muray.

 

blogged here: goodmotherlizard.blogspot.com/2010/05/dresser.html

Kedleston Hall (National Trust). Derby, Derbyshire, UK.

Free download under CC Attribution ( CC BY 4.0). Please credit the artist and rawpixel.com.

 

Higher resolutions with no attribution required can be downloaded: www.rawpixel.com/category/public_domain

Identifier: principlesofdeco00dresuoft

Title: Principles of decorative design

Year: 1870 (1870s)

Authors: Dresser, Christopher

Subjects: Decoration and ornament Decoration and ornament

Publisher: London New York : Cassell Petter & Galpin

Contributing Library: Dorothy H. Hoover Library, Ontario College of Art & Design

Digitizing Sponsor: The Ontario College of Art & Design

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

Fig. 94. wall is better treated as a wall, and not so covered with drapery as to leave spacefor vermin between the wall and its enrichment. There is also the further objectionthat the lines where the fabric is joined are visible, and these are most certainlyobjectionable. Besides the illustrations of German ornament just given, we figure also aspecimen of Indian embroidery on cotton (Pig. 94). I cannot too strongly recom-mend the designer of patterns for woven goods to study the native fabrics of India,exliibited at the Indian Museum, Whitehall. Besides the collection liere brought together, there is also in most of our INDIAN EMBROIDERY ON COTTON. 115 manufacturing towns a large series of specimens of these cloths deposited with theChamber of Commerce, and these can be consulted by all respectable members of the

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Fig. 1)5.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Enjoyed making these colourful birds. Gujrati design worked in chain stitch.

Clay embroidery, Agate, and swarovski beads.

Art Bead Scene's August challenge is "The Indian Rug", I just found it on Aug 28. Since I am working on Embroidary these days I had fun making these beautiful pair. The work is so beautiful reminds me thread work of Kashmir(India), so I have named it Kashmiri Earrings.. MAde with Polymer clay, Brass, Swarovski Crystals, Swarovski Rhinestones, Moss Agate.

Art Bead Scene's August challenge is "The Indian Rug", I just found it on Aug 28. Since I am working on Embroidary these days I had fun making these beautiful pair. The work is so beautiful reminds me thread work of Kashmir(India), so I have named it Kashmiri Earrings.. MAde with Polymer clay, Brass, Swarovski Crystals, Swarovski Rhinestones, Moss Agate.

Fun and colourful birds based on traditional Gujrati designs. Easy and quick to make.

 

Free download under CC Attribution ( CC BY 4.0). Please credit the artist and rawpixel.com.

 

Higher resolutions with no attribution required can be downloaded: www.rawpixel.com/category/public_domain

These embroideries of mine will be stuck on plain cards to make greeting cards.

Textures has been a very popular trend for Autumn/Winter 2010-11. So here once again I have reworked this jacket using vintage Indian embroidery, tassels, beads , fabric petals and lace. I enjoy using any form of textiles and colours in all my work,, so this was a joy to design and make. Created by hand wth love

Autumn/Winter 2010-11 collection

Art Bead Scene's August challenge is "The Indian Rug", I just found it on Aug 28. Since I am working on Embroidary these days I had fun making these beautiful pair. The work is so beautiful reminds me thread work of Kashmir(India), so I have named it Kashmiri Earrings.. MAde with Polymer clay, Brass, Swarovski Crystals, Swarovski Rhinestones, Moss Agate.

Identifier: illustrateddicti00moll

Title: An illustrated dictionary of words used in art and archaeology. Explaining terms frequently used in works on architecture, arms, bronzes, Christian art, colour, costume, decoration, devices, emblems, heraldry, lace, personal ornaments, pottery, painting, sculpture, &c., with their derivations

Year: 1883 (1880s)

Authors: Mollett, John W. (John William)

Subjects: Art -- Dictionaries Archaeology -- Dictionaries

Publisher: London, S. Low, Marston, Searle and Rivington

Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

likea boss ; raised ornamental work. Embowed, Her. Bent. An arm embowedhas the elbow to the dexter. Embrasure, Arch, (i) The interval betweenthe COPS of a battlement. (2) An expansion ofdoorways, windows, &c., given by slanting thesides. (See Splay.) Embroidery is one of the oldest of the orna-mental arts, .^ome specimens of ancient Egyp-tian embroidery are exhijjited in the Louvre, andHerodotus mentions the embroidered vestmentsof the gods in Egypt. The Israelites appointedAholiab, a cunning workman, and an embroi-derer in blue, and purple, and scarlet, and finelinen, to be chief embroiderer to the sacred ark.The prophet Ezekiel mentions the embroideryof Tyre. It was the principal domestic occu-pation of ladies in Greece, from the days whenPenelo]5e embroidered a garment for Ulysses,representing a dog chasing a deer. The Romanscalled embroidery Phrygium, and imported ART AND ARCH/EOLOGY it largely from the East. In later times Byzan-tium was celebrated for its embroidered eccle-

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Y.-^. ■2Zii. Indian Embroidery. In the Indian section ofthe South Kensington Museum. siastical vestments. Pope Paschal, in the 9thcentury, was the greatest patron of the art.When the Caliph Omar pillaged the Fersiaiipalace of Khosroes, he found there a carpet ofsilk and cloth of gold, sixty cubits square, hav-ing a garden depicted upon it, and rubies,emeralds, sapphires, beryls, topazes, and pearlsarranged with consummate skill to representtrees, fruit and flowers, rivulets, fountains, rosesand shrubs. Our English word embroideryis derived from the Celtic brouda, to prick.Anglo - Saxon embroidery was celebrated through -out Europe as Ofns Anglicamim. The celebratedBayeux tapestry is attributed to the 12th century.A copy of it may be seen in the South Kensing-ton Museum. The art decayed in Englandduring the Civil War of the 17th century. Embrued, Her. Stained with blood. Embu. A French term for the loss of tone in an oilsketch, caused by the absorption of the oil whilstit is drying.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

This was a custom order, refinishing a dresser than had been in my client's family for a long time. They requested that I incorporate Frida Kahlo in some way, and that I use some positive quotes that would be inspiring for their daughter, who will use the dresser.

 

This design was an attempt to recreate a beautiful portrait of Frida by the photographer Nickolas Muray.

 

blogged here: goodmotherlizard.blogspot.com/2010/05/dresser.html

Identifier: animalproducts00simm

Title: Animal products;

Year: 1877 (1870s)

Authors: Simmonds, Peter Lund, 1814-1897. [from old catalog]

Subjects: Animal products. [from old catalog] Domestic animals. [from old catalog]

Publisher: New York, Pub. by Scribner, Welford, and Armstrong

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

on deer.Deer skin leggings or breeches made of deer skin are much likedand used by the hunters in North West America. In the small Indian village of Lorette in Canada no less than2,500 deer skins, besides a large number of those of other wildanimals, are worked up annually into winter shoes and mocassins,and as many as 20,000 pairs are made from that number, sellingwholesale at an average of from one to two dollars per pair; 1,000pair of raquettes or snow shoes, selling at from three to six dollarsa pair; 300 Indian sleds or toboganes selling at from one to twodollars a pair; besides a quantity of ornamental articles of consider-able value—thus yielding a return of upwards of ^7,000 to thehunters and natives of this one village for their years industry. Deer hair when it can be obtained is used for stuffing saddles,for which it is a good material. Case 96 contains samples of deer DEER HAIR. 185 hair and fancy Indian embroidery work made with it in Canada,slippers, baskets, &c. e

 

Text Appearing After Image:

DEER HAIR MAGNIFIED. It, has been made known by Professor Busk, that the hair ofthe deer tribe is peculiar, being almost entirely cellular; and thehair has been described and figured by Dr. Inman in an ablepaper, On the Natural History and Microscopic Character ofHair, published in the Proceedings of the Literary and Philo-sophical Society of Liverpool. The subject here figured is theskin and hair of one of the North American reindeer • but thestructure seems to be the same in all deer—in the moose, thered-deer, roe-deer, musk-deer, &c, but not in the antelopes. The figure on the right hand represents a somewhat magnifiedportion of the skin, with both kinds of hair issuing from it; theleft-hand figure represents a more highly magnified small hair;the upper centre figure shows a highly magnified portion of the 186 DESCRIPTION OF DEER HAIR. large hair; the lower centre figure, a transverse section of this;and the middle centre, a longitudinal section. Dr. Inman says : In the dee

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

1 3 4 5 6