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La ría Deseado, sobre cuya entrada se levanta Puerto Deseado, se dice que es una de las formaciones naturales más bellas de América. Pero, además, efectivamente por su geología y fauna es única, por lo que fue nombrada Reserva Natural Intangible. Es un río que abandonó su cauce, y éste fue ocupado por el mar.

La ría Deseado es única en Sudamérica, aquí la marea oceánica influye hasta aproximadamente 40 km de lo que sería la boca del río y está llena de rarezas biológicas. Y la fauna marina que penetra a esta ría es una de ellas.

Este accidente geográfico que se produce sobre el río Deseado ha erosionado a lo largo de siglos la meseta que la rodea y formado unos cañadones dignos de ver. Especialmente desde sus miradores, como el Darwin.

 

The Ria Deseado, on whose entry is lifted Puerto Deseado, is said to be one of the most beautiful natural formations of America. But, in addition, effectively for its geology and fauna is unique, so was named Intangible Natural Reserve. It is a river that abandoned its channel, and it was occupied by the sea.

The Deseado Estuary is unique in South America, here the tide oceanic influences until approximately 40 km of what would be the mouth of the river and is full of oddities biological. And the marine fauna that penetrates this estuary is one of them.

This geographical accident that occurs on the Deseado river has eroded over the centuries the plateau that surrounds and formed a few canyons worth seeing. Especially since their viewpoints, as the Darwin.

"When you see how fragile and delicate life can be, all else fades into the background".

~ Jenna Morasca

 

"The unreal is more powerful than the real, because nothing is as perfect as you can imagine it, because it's only intangible ideas, concepts, beliefs, fantasies that last. Stone crumbles, wood rots. People, well, they die. But things as fragile as a thought, a dream, a legend, they can go on and on".

~ Chuck Palahniuk

 

press L

"rosanero" the slideshow :

 

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

  

At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

 

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

 

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

 

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;

• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

 

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.

It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

 

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.

Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

 

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

 

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

"rosanero" the slideshow :

 

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

  

At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

 

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

 

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

 

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;

• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

 

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.

It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

 

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.

Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

 

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

 

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

"rosanero" the slideshow :

 

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

  

At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

 

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

 

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

 

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;

• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

 

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.

It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

 

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.

Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

 

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

 

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

font: Tropicali Script

 

textures and effects by Remember Remember

 

See more in my Winter set Here

 

Winter Sunrise by Mary Webb

 

All colours from the frozen earth have died,

And only shadow stains the cold, white snow:

But in the air the April tints abide;

Intangibly and radiantly they grow.

There bloom immortal crocuses, beside

A live-rose hedge, and irises that grow

Along a far green inlet--circling wide

Anemone fields where none but stars may go.

The ardours of a thousand springs are there;

Through infinite deeps they quicken, bright and tender:

In that sequestered garden of the air

No icy pall is heavy on the splendour.

Since you are not in the wintry world to love me,

How softly painted flushes Death above me!

"rosanero" the slideshow :

 

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

  

At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

 

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

 

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

 

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;

• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

 

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.

It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

 

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.

Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

 

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

 

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

"rosanero" the slideshow :

 

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

  

At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

 

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

 

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

 

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;

• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

 

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.

It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

 

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.

Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

 

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

 

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

Nowrūz (Persian language: نوروز [noʊruːz]), meaning 'New Day') is the traditional ancient Iranian festival and also the start day of Iranian "New Year".

 

Nowruz is celebrated and observed by Iranian peoples and the related cultural continent and has spread in many other parts of the world, including parts of Central Asia, South Asia, Northwestern China, the Crimea and some ethnic groups in Albania, Bosnia, Serbia and the Republic of Macedonia.

 

Nowruz marks the first day of Spring and the beginning of the year in Iranian calendar. It is celebrated on the day of the astronomical vernal equinox, which usually occurs on March 21 or the previous/following day depending on where it is observed. As well as being a Zoroastrian holiday and having significance amongst the Zoroastrian ancestors of modern Iranians, the same time is celebrated in the Indian sub-continent as the new year. The moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator and equalizes night and day is calculated exactly every year and Iranian families gather together to observe the rituals.

 

The term Nowruz in writing, first appeared in Persian records in the second century AD, but it was also an important day during the time of the Achaemenids (c. 648-330 BC), where kings from different nations under the Persian empire used to bring gifts to the emperor also called King of Kings (Shahanshah) of Persia on Nowruz.

 

The UN's General Assembly in 2010 recognized the International Day of Nowruz, describing it a spring festival of Persian origin which has been celebrated for over 3,000 years.In 2009 Nowrūz was officially registered on the UNESCO List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Since 2010, the United Nations General Assembly recognizes March 21 as the "International Day of Nowruz".

 

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nowruz

www.nypp.org/

   

Every Thursday, the gothic “Puerta de los Apóstoles” (The Apostles’ Gate) of the Valencia Cathedral becomes the setting for the Water Tribunal, an institution that dates back to the Middle Ages. Declared Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO, this institution regulates the use of water to irrigate the fertile plains of the Region of Valencia.

 

La Puerta de los Apóstoles de la Catedral de Valéncia es de estilo gótico y en ella se celebra cada jueves el Tribunal de las Aguas, institución de origen medieval, declarada Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial de la Humanidad por la UNESCO, que regula de palabra el uso del agua para los riegos de la huerta.

 

Ciutat Vella de València (Spain)

"rosanero" the slideshow :

 

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

  

At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

 

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

 

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

 

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;

• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

 

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.

It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

 

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.

Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

 

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

 

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

“The unreal is more powerful than the real, because nothing is as perfect as you can imagine.

Because its only intangible ideas, concepts, beliefs, fantasies that last.

Stone crumbles. Wood rots. People, well, they die. But things as fragile as a thought, a dream, a legend, a memory, they can go on and on.”

~ Chuck Palahniuk ~

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ReAWq3lyHg8

Der Djemaa el Fna ist der zentrale Marktplatz in Marrakesch in Marokko. Die Bedeutung des Namens ist umstritten. Im Arabischen heißt Djemaa el Fna etwa Versammlung der Toten. Dieser Name rührt daher, dass die Sultane zur Zeit der Almohaden den Platz als Hinrichtungsstätte nutzten. Heute herrscht ein wildes Treiben mit Gauklern und Schlangenbeschwörern, Geschichtenerzählern, Wahrsagerinnen sowie Künstlern und Musikern, ferner gibt es Verkaufsstände, an denen kulinarische Spezialitäten der Region gereicht werden. Der Kulturraum des Djemaa-el-Fna-Platzes wurde im Jahr 2001 als erster Ort in die neu geschaffene UNESCO-Liste der Meisterwerke des mündlichen und immateriellen Erbes der Menschheit aufgenommen und befindet sich seit 2008 auf der Repräsentativen Liste des immateriellen Kulturerbes der Menschheit (Wikipedia).

 

Jemaa el-Fnaa is a square and market place in Marrakesh's medina quarter (old city). The origin of its name is unclear. One translation is "assembly of the dead", referring to public executions on the plaza around 1050 CE. Nowadays the square is predominantly occupied by orange juice stalls, water sellers with traditional leather water-bags and brass cups, youths with chained Barbary apes and snake charmers. As the day progresses, the entertainment on offer changes: the snake charmers depart, and late in the day the square becomes more crowded, with Chleuh dancing-boys (it would be against custom for girls to provide such entertainment), story-tellers, magicians, and peddlers of traditional medicines. As darkness falls, the square fills with dozens of food-stalls as the number of people on the square peaks. In 2001 the square became the first UNESCO Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity (Wikipedia).

Ancient Mesoamerican ceremony/ritual still performed today. The ritual consists of dance and the climbing of a 30-meter pole from which four of the five participants then launch themselves tied with ropes to descend to the ground. The fifth remains on top of the pole, dancing and playing a flute and drum. According to one myth, the ritual was created to ask the gods to end a severe drought. The ceremony was named an Intangible Cultural Heritage by UNESCO in order to help the ritual survive and thrive in the modern world.

 

Ancestral ceremonia/rito Mesoamericano aun practicado hoy. El ritual consiste en una danza donde los cinco participantes suben a un poste de 30 metros de altura, cuatro de ellos para luego lanzarse al vacío atados con cuerdas hasta llegar al piso. El quinto participante permanece el poste bailando y tocando la flauta. De acuerdo a la mitología, el ritual fue creado para pedirles a los dioses lluvia para terminar la sequía. La ceremonia fue nombrada Herencia Cultural por la UNESCO para ayudar a preservar el ritual.

 

Deze 3 bronzen figuren staan sinds 1999 in een vijverpartij in Oudewater. Ze worden Naïaden genoemd. Dat zijn Griekse waternimfen en ze zijn waarschijnlijk dochters van de potamiden, de riviergoden. Naïaden beschermen alle zoete wateren.

 

De Naïaden raken met hun benen en haren hun alterego’s in het water. Zo raakt de werkelijkheid het niet tastbare en dat symboliseert het leven en de dood. Dat laatste was de opdracht die de kunstenares kreeg van de gemeente Oudewater.

 

Ze zijn gemaakt door Tine van der Weyer ( 1951), een Nederlandse beeldhouwster, kunstenares, ex-lerares Nederlands en ex-politica van de PvdA. Op http:/./tinevandeweyer.nl/ is meer werk van haar te zien.

 

English:

These 3 bronze figures have been standing in a pond in Oudewater since 1999. They are called Naïads. They are Greek water nymphs and they are probably daughters of the potamids, the river gods. Naïads protect all fresh waters.

 

The Naïads hit their alter egos in the water with their legs and hair. In this way reality touches the intangible and that symbolizes life and death. The latter was the assignment that the artist received from the municipality of Oudewater.

 

They were made by Tine van der Weyer (1951), a Dutch sculptor, artist, former Dutch teacher and former politician of the PvdA. More work by her can be seen at http: /./ tinevandeweyer.nl/.

"rosanero" the slideshow :

 

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

  

At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

 

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

 

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

 

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;

• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

 

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.

It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

 

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.

Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

 

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

 

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

Shrimp fishing on horseback has existed on the Belgian coast since 1510, according to historical archives. The fishing method, in which a horse pulls a net, was spread along the entire North Sea where the gently sloping beach allowed this. Since 2013, this old fishing method is Unesco Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Winter Trends_004

 

- Here are two NEW! [Aleutia] stunning pieces, both available at Winter Trends from December 8 to December 22, 2017:

 

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Intangible/69/114/25

 

- CATWA NEW COLLECTION

 

CATWA BOTOX EYES&LIPS (SPECIAL NUDE GLOSSY)

 

Available at the mainstore:

 

sold separately colors.

  

Per tu, escotesco...per compartir amb art sublim lo intangible...

:)

 

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