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Since we are not allowed out of the house. It will be a while till a get some new photos taken. :'( We really do take for granted the simple freedoms of our lives. I MISS going for my drives and finding new places to take pictures at.

 

BUT...

 

Silver lining at hand though...

I've been looking up online for new places like stables-farms-and parcs in my area. And have contacted a couple and lined up with permission a few new photoshoots.

 

My advice to you... take this time and do some searching online as to whats in your town or surroundings. Then send them an email explaining your photographer who would like to get some practice in at there establishment.

 

You'd be surprise how many would love the idea if they get copies of your work. Which is exactly how I got to the Ecurie Le Van Stables, where I take all those Horse captures. Where I even sold many of my photos to the Owners of the Horses. Also where I recently went to take the Alpaca shot's at an Alpaca Farm. And a Dog training Kennel. Win-Win if you ask me :)

 

I can't wait for the confinement rules to be lifted and to get out there again :)

 

Be safe everyone :) xx

1859 besuchte Leutnant Steinkopf einen alten Freund in Russland. Der schenkte ihm zum Abschied einen jungen Bären, welchen er mit der Flasche aufgezogen hatte. Nicht viel später in Bernburg zurück, verschenkte er den halbwüchsigen Bären an den Landrat Bunge weiter, wie es hieß "zur Belustigung seiner Kinder". Der größer werdende Bär wurde trotz seiner Zahmheit und Anhänglichkeit, aber ohne wirkliche Abrichtung gefährlich.

In seiner Not bot der Landrat den Bären am 24. Juli 1859 seinen Hoheiten an. Die Herzogin Friederike veranlasste den Bau eines kleinen Zwingers mit Teich im alten Burggraben des Schlosses. Die Staatskasse übernahm die Kosten für Fütterung und Pflege.

In dem Bärenzwinger gab es bis August 2018 immer Braunbären.

War der Bär zwar nie Bernburgs Wappentier, so wird jedoch der anhaltische Bär erstmals vom Bernburger Fürsten Bernhard III. (er regierte von 1323 bis 1348) als Reitersiegel verwendet und ziert seither als markantes Signet, als „Logo“, das Bernburger Land.

Die Askanier und Albrecht der Bär, als Gründer des Fürstentums Anhalt, begannen erst ab 1328 zögerlich, sich des Bären als Wappentier zu bedienen.

 

In 1859 Lieutenant Steinkopf visited an old friend in Russia. As a farewell he gave him a young bear, which he had raised with the bottle. Not much later, back in Bernburg, he gave the teenage bear away to District Administrator Bunge, as it was called "for the amusement of his children". The growing bear became dangerous in spite of his tameness and attachment, but without real training.

In his need, the district administrator offered the bear to his Highnesses on July 24, 1859. The Duchess Friederike arranged for the construction of a small kennel with a pond in the old moat of the castle. The state treasury paid for feeding and care.

There were always brown bears in the bear pen until August 2018.

Although the bear was never Bernburg's heraldic animal, the Anhalt bear was first named by Prince Bernhard III of Bernburg. (he ruled from 1323 to 1348) used as a rider's seal and since then has adorned the Bernburger Land as a distinctive signet, as a “logo”.

The Ascanians and Albrecht the Bear, as the founders of the Principality of Anhalt, only hesitantly began to use the bear as a heraldic animal from 1328.

montagsforum.blogsport.eu/aktuelles/baeren-am-bernburger-...

One of the high-lights of the boat ride was getting to view the kennel that was started in 1980 by David Monson and his wife Susan Butcher, four time Iditarod Champion. While the boat idles, the guide has a conversation with the handlers on land. Susan Butcher sadly died from Leukemia 10 years ago, but her two daughters continue the dog training at Trail Breaker and speak to the tourists as the boats pass by.

 

the second in comments is a brief video if interested

 

trailbreakerkennel.com/

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Butcher

Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down

In a most delightful way

Mary Poppins

 

Our baby's sick. She started coughing last friday, and it didn't sound very well. I did some googling and the symptons looked a lot like kennel cough (that's a inflammation of the upper respiratory system). But saturday morning at the training nothing was wrong, no coughing, excited as always...At home she started coughing again...throwing up slime..So I gave her some thyme syrup and it went a little better. I couldn't

temperature her, 'cause I have an ear thing that doesn't work on animals, but she didn't feel that warm or anything. The cough decreased, but this morning she also felt really warm so I called the VET and went there with her. And sadly, I was right, she does have the highly contagious kennel cough, a throat inflammation and also a fever. Now she has painkillers and anti biotics..And I can't finnish the agility with her, which is really sad for both of us. My poor baby, she must be in pain, but she acts still very sweet and lively. I give her some honey on this photo, that and the thyme syrup she really likes :D and she's allowed to sleep on my lap on the couch till she feels better.

One of the high-lights of the boat ride was getting to view the kennel that was started in 1980 by David Monson and his wife Susan Butcher, four time Iditarod Champion. While the boat idles, the guide has a conversation with the handlers on land. Susan Butcher sadly died from Leukemia 10 years ago, but her two daughters continue the dog training at Trail Breaker and speak to the tourists as the boats pass by.

 

trailbreakerkennel.com/

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Butcher

We left Bruno's usual kennel at home for our trip to the cabin, so used this exercise pen instead. It's 4 feet high. When we returned from a family trip for ice cream he greeted us at the door, even though the pen was still locked and we were sure we had put him in there. During his freedom he had peed on the kid's bed and pooped on a fan. Yup, the poop hit the fan. Fortunately it was the base of the fan and the fan was off at the time.

 

So we thought it was a one time thing and the next day he went in the pen while the family went out for a paddle board. When we came back - he greeted us at the door again. No presents on the bed or fan this time.

 

Now what would good dog owners do but put him back in the pen and watch. Turns out escape was a simple process for our little Houdini.

 

It happens that the Studio 26 assignment was x-typchs. I knew this was my subject, but had a hard time narrowing down the photos. As you can hear from the video I took a few. In the end I think 4 photos tells the story rather well, without being overwhelming.

 

A video of this great escape is linked in the comments.

 

--------

Dogversation added Sept 28, 2018

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Dave: Hey Bruno, where are you going?

Bruno: Jail break! No walls can confine me!

Dave: Really? You're going to be an escape artist.

Bruno: Yup. Being locked in this cage is simply intolerable. It's like a horror show in there.

Dave: I thought it was an open exercise pen with soft carpeted floor with a nice towel and a good view of the lake.

Bruno: Yup. Really a substandard situation.

Dave: I think you may be setting your standards a little high. You're a new puppy who has yet learned to pee outside and likes to chew electrical cords. Kennel training is apparently a good thing to help you learn the house rules.

Bruno: Can't talk. Busy escaping.

Dave: And what is the plan when you do escape?

Bruno: Do what I do best - lounge on the bed like the magnificent beast that I am.

Dave: And that's it?

Bruno: Nope. I'll let you humans hang with me too,unless you'd prefer to spend a bit of time in an open exercise pen with carpeted floor, a towel and a nice view of the lake.

Currently the Queensland Police Service (QPS) Dog Squad acquires dogs through its breeding program and via donation from members of the public. The dogs are assessed for their potential as police dogs and following selection, they are allocated to handlers for training.

 

From early 2005 the Service opened the Puppy Development Kennel Complex at the Brisbane Dog Squad and now undertakes a Puppy Development Program. The program progresses puppies identified by the State co-ordinator as suitable for police work.

 

The puppy development program begins training pups from around 12 days old, focusing on desensitising them to surrounding noises. At eight to 10 weeks, they begin retrieval exercises to test their abilities as working dogs.

  

After this, the puppies are sent to carers throughout the state until they are old enough to begin the next series of training. Here they learn socialisation skills necessary to become a part of the community. During this time they will increase their confidence by visiting schools and shopping centres where there are crowds and plenty of activity.

 

The pups will remain in foster care until they are 12 to 16 months before they return to the complex to receive a 14 week formal training. Around 75 percent of the puppies pass this course.

  

Queensland puppies have been provided to the RAAF, other police services and Corrective Services throughout Australia.

Winterville, GA (Clarke County) Copyright 2012 D. Nelson

 

Back home in the states, I pick up Tessa from the boarding/training kennel - Pacesetter Kennel in Winterville, GA. They did a great job. Tessa did not lose any weight at all, which was a big concern - they managed to keep weight on her by feeding her three times her normal portion. Tessa went through 40 lbs of rich kibble plus oil in 3 weeks. The training went well too, and during the 90-minute debriefing, I learned more about how things were accomplished and was much impressed.

 

This is the sign at the gated entrance - I have to giggle everytime I see it. And it is highly effective!

During the Jazz Age:

 

During the 1920s, Etzel von Oeringen, a German Shepherd who began life in Berlin, Germany as a police dog, became the first animal Hollywood superstar when he came to the U.S. and became...

 

STONGHEART!

 

As J. Allen Boone, with whom Strongheart lived for a significant time, states in "Letters to Strongheart" (1939) before he was ready to be in films, his training to be a performer--indeed a "leading man" involved a major transformation: "He had everything a...police dog required--size, strength, endurance, courage, fearlessness, aggressiveness....[But] he had no sense of fun, no joy, no affection, and did not know how to play....He had to be de-regimented....He had to be taught the meaning of love and friendship; how to play and have fun; how to care for others and be of service to them....The result of all this is now kennel and motion-picture history."

 

We will tell more about that later.

 

Here, we have the climactic scene from Strongheart's movie with Clara Bow entitled "The Strongest Heart." Clara Bow plays a girl who has lost consciousness after inhaling smoke when her father's adversaries set fire to the family home.

 

Strongheart's character's prowess at creative problem-solving is such that he ties the girl to him with his leash, puts her across his body and then makes "The Heroic Leap," jumping from the top of the building before it collapses. Thus, they are both saved.

 

Strongheart! The Wonder Dog!

 

*******************************************************

*J. Allen Boone's "Letters to Strongheart" is such a wise and poignant book with a spiritual point of view.

**Also, in real life, Clara Bow and Strongheart never made a film together but in the world of Blythe, anything is possible!

 

Many revelations have come out this weekend on facebook about the identity of the people who have leaked court documents and videos from the Belfast City Council and conducted a sustained smear attack on Lennox's family for over a year . Since serious charges will probably follow I will not reveal more but it is to be hoped that the relevant authorities will release Lennox immediately in light of these incidents.

 

On Victoria's site

 

Valuable insight into the Lennox case from Jim Crosby, retired Police Lieutenant and Canine Dog Bite Investigator:

 

Over the last few months I have watched the case of Lennox, a dog seized for having the “wrong” looks, as it has unfolded in Belfast, Ireland. Lennox was seized, not for behavior, but because he has a particular physical structure. He looks like what Ireland terms a ‘restricted breed’. He is neutered, has obedience training, is properly vaccinated and was legally licensed-yet he was summarily seized and has been condemned to die. As I have watched Lennox’s case, and his impending death sentence, several things have sparked my attention. Not only does the issue of destroying this animal solely based on his looks appall me, but I am particularly concerned by the "evaluations" of Lennox that the Council and Court are depending on to make a determination of his level of threat to society.

 

To begin, Lennox has been held for over a year in a shelter facility. He has been deprived of his normal social contacts-his family, has had limited exercise and interaction outside his kennel, and has even been medicated with amitriptyline.

 

Two dog behaviorists have evaluated the dog to date. I understand both have weighed in that Lennox is not a dangerous dog. The videos and evaluations have shown Lennox to have substantial control of his behavior, that he is a sociable and pleasant animal despite his long isolation and confinement away from his home, and that he showed clear restraint when one evaluator pushed him into a trapped area in a threatening manner. At that crisis point Lennox did the only thing that makes sense to a dog; he lunged, with no contact, in order to communicate clearly that he was frightened and felt threatened when he had no where else to retreat. He did the equivalent to a human raising their voice when other means of communication fail.

 

This speaks volumes for this individual dog. Despite everything that has happened to him he still shows restraint in his behavior and a desire for human social contact. He still displays clear bite inhibition. He still responds appropriately to social cues. This is also despite the conduct of these evaluations in a restricted shelter environment.

 

The third evaluation was conducted by a police dog handler. As a retired police Lieutenant I have known a number of canine handlers-and the trainers that prepare the dogs before police get them. I have participated in the testing and evaluation of police dogs before their training. And I can say this-police canine handlers and trainers are special, valued and talented persons-but they are not behaviorists.

 

A police dog is a special animal. Only about ten percent of the candidates are chosen. They need terrific drive, huge levels of trainability, and a great desire to work in tandem with a human handler. They must be brave enough to go in where no person or animal reasonably should, yet must be able to instantly disengage when ordered to, despite inertia and provocation. They must not be aggressive, as anger would interfere with the ability to disengage at need. They must also be able to use nearly human levels of discrimination to understand when they must self-deploy to protect their handler, yet must recognize the difference between a violent suspect and the approach of an innocent child. We ask so much of them-and they give it all willingly, sometimes to the death.

 

Police dog handlers and trainers must be highly skilled to get this level or performance. But that skill is limited to the task at hand. Police handlers do not address behavior problems of other animals-they are focused on the training, maintenance and development of their special charges. These handlers conduct obedience work with their dogs as part of the control mechanism, but do not diagnose or treat problems that range from house training to nuisance barking. They do not treat, or particularly evaluate, aggression issues. If a dog exhibits aggression in training it is eliminated as unsuitable. An aggressive or "mean" dog is a risk to the Department, the handler, and the public.

 

Even Animal Control Officers may be deficient when evaluating what is a "dangerous" dog. They encounter animals that are often not at their best, often threatened or injured, and frankly do not get the behavioral training necessary to make the decision between treatment of repairable behavior and that which is clearly dangerous. They can say whether a dog's behavior, in a specific incident, meets the legal definition of "dangerous" in their jurisdiction, but often fall far short of being able to diagnose whether this was truly dangerous aggression or was a storm brought about by a collection of predictable, reasonable animal behavior and human failing. In the case of Lennox the dog warden's job was in some ways too easy; did Lennox look like one of the "usual suspects"? He did, so the case was closed, even though Lennox never had a chance to speak.

 

Assessing dog aggression, and evaluating whether a dog is "dangerous", even when presented with clear criteria (which do not exist in this case) is a job best left to those familiar with more than just whether a dog is physically able to bite. Any dog can bite-they have teeth. A competent evaluator must understand the psychological issues behind the multiple behaviors we lump together as aggression. Is the dog territorial? Is the dog a resource guarder? Is the dog fearful? Can the dog adapt to novel and potentially scary situation while maintaining an acceptable level of composure? Is the dog responsive to human signals, and is the dog able to signal its own intentions clearly? Does the dog have the inter-species social skills needed to peacefully coexist in a multi-species social environment? Those are the questions that need to be asked before determining if a dog's behavior is "dangerous".

 

Having a police dog handler evaluate Lennox for his suitability as a patrol or detection dog would be appropriate; it would be having a skilled technician and trainer choosing whether Lennox would make the cut as a working dog. We would not ask the police trainer to evaluated Fire Department equipment, even though he might like the red suspenders. To have the police handler evaluating Lennox as a behaviorist is a disservice to the dog-and the handler.

 

And the worst part of this? The case is no longer about Lennox. It is about rules, it is about discrimination, and finally about egos. Problem is, the bruised egos will heal-but when Lennox is dead, he is dead.

 

Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsman41884sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

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1884 2£lt.c fprtcte m& j?povtsmnu. 20o ATHLETICS. Athletes will be pleased to know that the track at the Olympic Grounds, Oakland, is to be pnt in order next week bo that all may start in training for the opening meet of the season, to be held by the Olympic Club on Decoration Day, May 30th. The meeting this year will no doubt excel in merit, competition and attendance auy athletic meeting ever held on the coast. Judging by the great number of new men who are going to take part in the different events, it will not be surprising if some latent talent is developed, particularly in the shorter races. It is a peculiar fact that nearly all men try sprint running on this coast, and as the competition is always a great deal more keen than in the longer races, this is a matter to be wondered at. There is a great opening at our meetings for well-trained men at long distances. It was announced in the Australian papers that Joseph O'Brien would attempt to run against all previous records from 1 to 10 miles on March 17th at Melbourne, Australia. On a fifth of a mile gravel track O'Brien made a mile in 4 minutes 18| seconds, runningthrough a large held of competi- tors, and the Melbourne Sportsman claims that he ran a three- quarters of a mile race in 3 minutes, but the track must have been short as the time is altogether too fast. At any rate, O'Brien is a wonderful runner, and there is every reason to believe that on a good track and under favorable circum- stances he can beat Cummings' record of 4:16 1-5 for 1 mile. On February IGtb, at Sydney, Australia, J. W. Byrne Cleared, with apparent ease, the great height of 5 feet 3 inches in a standing high jump in a match against J. A. Byrne. This performance is tie with the best previous record, and which was made by E. W. Johnston in Baltimore, May 27th, 187S. In another match, the week following this event, Byrne essayed to beat the record, but owing to a severe strain he did not jump up to his record of the previous week. The only two football matches played this season have been won by the University team. No doubt the other clubs are beginning to find out that they cannot defeat the Univer- sity without a great amount of practice, and as they do not particularly care to practice there would appear little hope of any more games this season. T. M. Malone, the once famous amateur runner of Ireland, is now a professional runner in Australia. Malone defeated Myers in the great international race at Burmingham, Eng- land, 1881, after an exciting finish by one-half a yard, and was the first amateur that ran even time for 120 yards. The professional events held at the Recreation Grounds last Sunday were all very uninteresting, the time in all cases being slow, and the competitors werevery unevenly matched. Weston completed his 5,000-mile walk on March loth. The last mile was made in 9 minutes 17 seconds, and which was the quickest mile in the whole walk. At a football match in England between two schools S. Brutton, fourteen years old, kicked thirteen goals out of fourteen attempts. J. Robinson defeated R. Ashworth in a 150-yards foot-race at Bathurst, Australia, for S500 a side, in the alleged fast time of 14 4-5 seconds. A. E. Nnttall and T. H. Marsh both cleared 5 feet 7k in- ches running high jump at the Cambridge Sports, March 3d. National Cross-Country Championship. The eighth annual contest was held at Four Oak Park, near Birmingham, Eng., March 1st, and resulted in the vic- tory of the Mosely Harriers' defeating Bnchfield Harriers, South London Harriers, Cheshire Tally-ho Hare and Hounds, and the Small Heath Harriers. This is the fourth year run- ning that the Mosely Harriers have carried off this cham- pionship. W. G. George was the first home in 64 minutes 47 seconds, and was followed a minute later by his club- mate Carter. ___ THE KENNEL. Visits- To Fred. A. Taft's Gordon setter Dorr. January 14th, 1SS4. Gordon bitch owned by F. W. Dunn of Battle Mountain, Nev. February 2Sth, 18S4, English setter bitch Queen, owned by A. E. Brown of Rocklin, Cal. March 24th, 1SS4, Irish setter bitch Daisy, owned by E. J. Heins, of Carlin, Nev. Mr. Neil's splendid Irish red setter bitch Lena whelped twelve puppies on 22d inst, by his dog Pat O'More, which with Lena he recently imported from a celebrated eastern kennel. There were five bitches and seven dogs in the litter. Four of the former were drowned, Mr. Neil keeping only one for his own kennel. There are, perhaps, do better bred dogs in the State than the sire and dam of these puppies. Mr. Neil is a young enthusiast in thoroughbred dogs. In forming a kennel which he intends at a later date to make prominent, he has commenced well. We hope he will have good luck in raising this first and fine litter. They are all beauties. Mr. Jones of this city, who recently imported a .brace of pure English spaniels, we understand, has been out on an extended hunt in Humboldt county to try them, and returns thoroughly satisfied with the work that they performed. We are endeavoring to obtain the pedigree of these spaniels. Some day before long the spaniel in California, as in England, will become a great favorite with gun men. It only needs his many good qualities to become known. There is no more keen, enduring, faithful or attractive dog. A number of dogs have been poisoned in St. Helena and vicinity in the last few days, no less than a half dozen dying from the effects of the fatal dose. Some of the dogs were quite valuable. We should like to know whether this comes from carelessness in some or villainy in others. Farriers will please notice an advertisement of a red Irish setter pup for sale in another column. Mambrino Trotting- Stallion BILLIARDS. An interesting game of three-ball billiards was played a few days since at the Palace hotel, the contestants being lime. Adelina Patti and Signor Nicolini, and it is absolutely as that gentleman expressed himself in regard to his opponent, "She has a genius for everything." The game has few intri- cacies Madame cannot master, and after winning the lead-off shotshe continued to play with that perfect grace she displays all her undertakings on and off the stage. In the third in- ning Mme. Patti, after making a couple of caroms, with a delicate draw shot succeeded in cornering the balls by driv- ing the first object one the whole length of the table, making it return almost dead to the lower rail. After this masterly stroke on the part of a lady she turned to her adversary, her large eyes fairly sparkling with pleasure, and said: "I will surely win now," and her confidence was not amiss. As the time rolled on so did the score, the run netting her 17 points, the largest that lady has ever completed. M. Nico- lini held his own from this on, bat Madame with runs of 3, 5 and 8, and very few misses, managed to reach her fiftieth point and game, leaving >»rn with only 41 points to his credit. Madame Patti is a great lover of this game, and frequently practices until the small hours in the morning after coming from the opera, and she never misses an occasion to do so be- tween visits during the day. The billiard table on which the game took place is situated in a room adjoining Madame's parlor, which is ornamented with the necessary racks, cues, markers, etc. The table it- self is of a small pattern of the Brunswick make, and Mr. Nic- olini says that if it were possible to have an addition to the boudoir car he would take it along to relieve the monotony of the travel across the continent. Jacob Strahle & Co. have offered a purse of $50 to be played for this evening by Benjamin Saylor and J. F. B. Mc- Cleery. It is very probable that now that the Saylor Broth- ers are no longer restrained by feelings of delicacy that stopped them from accepting McCleery's bets during the last game they played will come forward in side issues on the re- sult of this game. Of course, McCleery then could have no excuse of a lack of interest in the play. The game between W. R. F. Lowry and McCleery, which took place in the first part of the week, in Watsonville, was won by the latter, the score standing 400 to 395. Winners average 104. Billiards in all the hotels except the Occidental seem to have taken a little livelier turn within the last few days. MONMOUTH PARK. Long Branch, New Jersey, Tlie Followfn⢠Stake Is Now Open. The CHAMPION STALLION STAKES for 18S5, for colts and fillies two vears old (now yearlings), to be entered at the coarse by 4 o'clock p. ii. on tne day before the day appointed for the race, of $250 each, with 35,000 added by the Monmouth Park Association to a subscrip- tion of 3500 each bv owners of stallions, whose get alone shall be quali- fied to start; the second horse and the subscribing owner of his sire each to receive SI,000; the third horse and the subscribing owner of his sire each to receive 3500; the winner to receive the stakes of horses en- tered for the race, and one-half of the money remaining after the fore- going deductions; the other half to go to the subscribing owner of the sire of the winner; the death of a subscriber not to disqualify the get of this stallion.if the subscription be paid; each nomination to be accom- panied by a contract in the form subjoined, which, if not fulfilled punctually bv the subscriber, may be transferred to and fulfilled by any owner or owners entering in the race the get of the stallion, and such owner or owners shall in that case be entitled to start and to the benefit accruing to the subscriber from first, second or third place in the race, and to recover from him the money contracted to be paid, if no benefit accrues; fifteen subscriptions to filL Three-quarters of a mile. Form of Contract. In consideration of the money to be added by the Moniuonth Park Association to the Champion Stallion Stakes for 1SS5, and in further con- sideration of the increased value given to the get of (my Stal- lion bv the right of entrv therein, which right of entry is not to be invalidated"by (my) decease, (I) agree to pay to the Monmouth Park Association, or order, five hundred dollars on the first dav of Julv, ISS5, at its office in the city of New York. The subscription of stallions to the above stakes will close and name on April 1st, 1SS4. Subscriptions to be addressed to J. H. Coster, Secre- tary Monmouth Park Association, Madison avenue and Twenty-seventh street. New York. Mr. Lorillard continues his gift of 35,000 to the Lorillard Stakes. The Champion Stallion Stakes and the Lorillard Stakes are intended to be permanent. The Lorillard Stoke? for 1886, with the following conditions, will close and name on August 15th, 1S34. The Lorillard Stakes for 1886, for three-year-olds, of 8500 each. h. f., or onlv 310 if declared bv January 1st, 1SS5; or $50 if declared by January 1st, 1SS6; or 9100 if declared bv June 25th, 1886; with 35,000 given by Mr. Pierre Lorillard; the Association to add 31,000 for the second; the third to save bis stake ; horses foaledin the United States are not eligible forthis stake unless sired in a foreign country, or by a stallion represented by sub- scription to the Champion Stallion Stakes for 18S5. One mile and a half. GEORGE I.. LORILLARD, President. J. H- COSTER, Secretary. TROTTING STALLIONS. THE TROTTING STALLION SILVERHBBL WILLJtAKETHESEASOXOF 1884 AT THE DASH AWAY STABLES, 370 Eleventh street, between Franklin and Webster streets, Oak- Silverheet is a dark bay. foaled July 5th 1S76; bred by R.B. Chisholm of Kane Countv, Illinois. Sired by Wilson's Blue Bull, his dam Maggie Rice by Gage's Logan; grandam Fanny Stratford, a mare which nad every mark of high breeding, and was the dam of John A. Rice that showed a 2:40 gait when two years old. Logan by Rysdyk's Hambletonian; his dam Lady Wallace by Ohio With little training when four years old, Silverheel showed three heat, inside of 2:40. terms. Twentv-flve dollars the season; will make terms for insurance. Sea- son to end July 1st. SACKBIDER A < 11ISIIO l.n. Standard Trotting Stallion BILLY HAYWARD, 489, At XJXES, Alameda Cootv. Terms S^O.OO. Good pasturage 83.00. JAN. J. HARTI.V. Vz' mi. The Chico Record quotes Charley Sherman as saying that he did not think there would be any spring meeting at Chico this year. The Almont Stallion ALTOONA, BY \LMONT-first dam Theresa B.. by Prophet, Jr.; second dam Mollv Floyd, by Mohawk; third dam, by Davy Crockett, a Cana- dian pacer; fourth dam Puss, a fine road mar." imported from Canada. Prophet, Jr., by Prophet, son of Hill's Vermont Black Hawk. Altoona was bred bv Gen. W. T. Withers, of Fairlawn, i? a dirk bay, a little over fifteen and three-quarter? hands, of high form and breed' iDHe will make the season of 18W. ending July 1st, at the ALMONT STABLES. 1352 San PabloAvenue, Oakland. Terms. 830 for the season, due on or before July 1st. For further information apply to or address --â««â . V. II. 111 .<" o \ . ALMONT STABLES, 1352 San Pablo Avenue, Oakland.

 

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ABBOTSFORD. San Mateo, Cal. Record "J:! 9 ! PEDIGREE. By Woodford Mambrino: lus dam Columbia, by Young Columbus Woodford Mambrino, by Mainbrino Chief, son of Mambrino Paymaster: dain Woodbine, (dam of Wedgewood, 2:19), by Woodford, sou of Kosciusko, bv Sir Archy. Mambrino Chief was mated with Woodbine, daughter of thoroughbred Woodford, and the produce was Woodford Mambrino, a horse, taking into consideration his limited opportunities iu the stud, tliat outranks, by what he has accomplished, all other stallions. Of the eightv-nine colts and fillies sired by him at Woodburn. not more than seventy-five reached maturity, and many of these were not handled for speed. When wasted by disease, Woodford Mambrino made a wonderful campaign on the turf,and he gained on a slow track, at Minneapolis, a record of *J ill Vfi- He has thirteen sons and daughters that have trotted in 2:30 or betterâ Abbotsford 2:19'-:: Malice U:195^; Manetta 2:1!'}-:-. Mambrino £>udlev2:22; Convov2:22--; Magenta 2:24^.; Manfred 2:25; Pancoast 2:25V; R'achel 2:26X; Inca2:27; Lady McFatridge 2:29; Dacia2:2tt^; Geo. A. Aver 2:30. Woodford Mambrino was also the sire of Princeps, the sire of "Trinket 2:14. It is proper to draw acomparison between Hambletonian and Woodford Mambrino. The first named stallion founded a great family, bnt in order to do it be got 1,330 foals out of selected mares. Thlrty- sevenof these enteredtne 2:30 list, and only two of them, Dexter and Nettie, beat 2:20. Hambletonian's percentage of 2:30 performers is within a fraction of one in thirty-six. Woodford Mambrino's percentage of 2:30 performers is within a fraction of one in seven. In other woras, Woodford Mambrino, making opportunity the basis of calculation, is five times greater than Hambletonian. Young Columbus, by Old Columbus, dam Black Maria, by Harris' HambletoniaD, son of Bisnop's Hambletonian. Young Columbus was the sire of Phil Sheridan, sire of Phvllis2:17>: Adelaide 2 J9^: Common- wealth2:22; Hiram Woodruff 2:25; Valley Chief 1:25; Faustina 2;28w: Phil Sheridan, Jr.,2;29Jri; Tom Malloy 2;30. TERMS. One hundred dollars the season, to be paid before removing the animal. Mares not proving in foal can be returned the following season, free of charge. Good pasturage at reasonable rates, and extra pains taken, but no liability for accidents or escapes. WASH JAMES, A-Piii. San Mateo, Cal. The Trotting Stallions Baywood and Fleetwood WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF ISM, COMMENCING FEB- ruary 15th, and ending July 1st, at the corner of Third and Empire streets, San Jose. BAYWOOD Is five years old, dark bay, with black points, IB bands high, and weigh 1,200 pounds, fine bone, level-headed and a good mover. Sired by Nutwood; first dam by Geo. M. Patchen; second dam b Champion; third dam by Belmont." FLEETWOOD Is four years old, sorrel, with both front feet white and white stripe face; 15% hands high, and weighs close to 1,100 pounds. He is a model a perfect horse; nigh life, fine style and action, and looks like thoroughbred. Sired by Nutwood. First dam Copper Bottom Mare, by Young Atner ica; second dam the Tillottson Mare, pedigree unknown'butshe was re ported to have been bred in Kentucky. Terms. 925 for the season, or 3-10 to insure. E S. SMITH. San Jose. The Trotting-Bred Stallion

  

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

... of the browndog in it's natural habitat.

 

it's been three weeks, but i am finally, almost, sort of feeling back to normal! i still haven't had any time or energy to take pictures, so here is one more snapshot for now, and hopefully we will get our 52 weeks mojo back next week.

 

yesterday, i took alice and june to a neighboring kennel club for their agility run-throughs. it was alice's first time ever doing agility anywhere other than at our training center, and she hasn't seen any contacts or weaves or run a full course in nearly four months, so i fully intended to just get her in the ring and let her do a few jumps and tunnels, for fun. well, she entered the ring on her turn, and was raring to go, jumping up and doing the woo-woos, and biting my arm... just like she does in class! so i sent her over the contacts a few times, and she went like she never missed a minute. same for the weaves. on our next turn in the ring, we went for the whole course, and she ran it like a champ! alice browndog is back!!

 

after the run-throughs, we went for a fantastic hike. today we spent a lot of time at our friend's farm, taking care of their donkeys while they are away. the dogs love it, they get to just run around and do whatever they please. alice likes to make her rounds, checking on all of the groundhog holes around the pond, making sure the little varmints are staying in their place.

A young Greater Manchester Police pup watches keenly from the exercise area of one of the Force Dog Training Unit’s kennels as older dogs go out to train.

 

The Dog Training Unit is based at the Hough End Complex, Chorlton-cum-Hardy and is responsible for the training of all GMP dogs. The unit provides a wide range of courses including initial, refresher & continuation training for all the Force’s dogs and their handlers as well as offering training to officers of other police forces.

 

For more information about Greater Manchester Police's dogs please visit our website.

www.gmp.police.uk

  

Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsman31883sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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4; j £3S8i4,. vi^ssSC".' ^'*>l^^^T*r- Vol. III. No. 16. SO. 50S MONTGOMERY STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1883. THE KENNEL. Pacific Coast Coursing Club. The Paci6c Coast Coursing Club held its regular fall meet- ing atM erced, last Wedeesday and Thursday. The drawing took place on Saturday night as follows: Thomas Brady's white dog Lord Byron agaiust John McCormick's brindle bitch Rosie Mack; M. Devlin's white and brindle dog Chief of the Canon against T. Cronin's white and black bitch Lily of Killarney; J. C. Pennie's black and white dog Spot against F. Callahan's brindle and white bitch Mountain Girl; D. D. Koache's fawn dog Ned of the Hills against John Dugan's brindle and white bitch Sallie Henry; John Egan's brindle and white bitch Lady Franklin, Jr., against James Kelly's black and white dog Swallow; E.Talbot's blue bitch Tem- pete against John Egan's brindle and white dog Lord Lurgan; J. C. Pennie's black and white dog King John againgt D. D. Koache's brindle dog Liberator; F. Callahan's brindle and white dog Foxhall against James Kelly's black and white dog Echo; William Hatpin's black and white bitch Culverin against P. A. McDonald's black bitch Antrim Maid; William Halpin's fawn and white bitch Lady Place against J. L. Nick- el's black and white bitch Sybil. The puppies were matched as follows: W. T. Rogers' brin- dle and white bitch Lady Flood against E.Talbot's white and brindle bitch Oceanic; E. Talbot's white and brindle dog Temper against T. Brady's brindle ani white bitch Wee Nell; William Halpin's brindle bitch Lady Alice against D. L. Levy's fawn and white bitch Lucky Crook; John Egan's brin- dle and white dog Tenbroeck against T. A. Hall's black and white bitch Fannie; John Dugan's brindle bitch Sadie against T. Cronin's brindle and white dog Martin Flynn; John Egan's brindle and white bitch Melroe against M. Devlin's white and brindle bitch Lovely. The club and guests to the number of 300" reached the coursing ground at 10 a. m. Wednesday, and at once set to work to settle the vexed question of supremacy. The first day concluded the old dog stake, Judge J. C. Pennie's King John winning first, Mark Devlin's Chief of the Cannon sec- ond, J. L. Nickel's Sybil third. The ties were as follows: First ties: Rosie Mack beat Lord Byron, Chief of the Canon beat Lily of Killarney, Mountain Girl beat Spot, Ned of the Hill beat Sallie Henry, Swallow beat Lady Franklyn, Jr., Tempete beat Lord Lurgan, King John beat Liberator, Fox- hall beat Echo, Culverin beat Antrim Maid, Sybil beat Lady Place. Second ties: Chief of the Canon beat Rosie Mack, Mountain Girl beat Ned of the Hill, Tempete beat Swallow, King John beat Foxhall, Sybil beat Culverin. Third ties: Chief of the Canon beat Mountain Girl (drawn lame), King John beat Tempete (drawn lame), Sybil ran a bye. Fourth ties: Chief of the Canon beat Sybil (drawn lame). Fifth ties: King John beat Chief of the Canon and won the first prize, Chief of the Canon won the second prize, Sybil won the third prize. The ground was very hard which accounts for so many dogs going lame. On Wednesday the puppy Stakes were decided. First tiesâE. Talbot's Oceanic beat W. T. Rodger's Lady Flood; E. Talbot's Templar beat T. Brady's Wee Nell; Wm. Halpin's Lady Alice beat D. L. Levy's Lucky Crook; John Eagan's Ten Broeck beat Hall's Fannie; T. Cronin's Martin Flynn beat John Eagan's Moll Roe. Second tiesâOceanic beat Lady Alice and Templar beat Ten Broeck; Lovely beat Martin Flynn. Final tiesâOceanic beat Templar; Lovely had a bye, Oceanic beat Lovely. Oceanic won first; Lovely second; TenBroeck third. In the consolidation stake Lord Byron beat Lily of Killar- ney and Lady Place beat Chicopee. Lord Byron and Lady Place divided the stakes, $20. A $50 matjgh, between Liberator and Antrim Maid, was won by Liberator. King John, the winner of the old dog stake, was raised on the Chowchilla ranch, Merced County. His sire and dam, â Thornton and Lizzie were imported from Liverpool by the1 owners of the ranch where they now are. King John is fif- teen months old, and was not in prime condition for the match which he so gallantly won. Everything is progressing favorably for the State Field Trials. Entries are being made and the affair is taking defi- nite shape. The judges, stakes, conditions, etc., will be ad- vertised next week in this paper. The Club does not desire 50 urge its claims undnly, but it does wish every one who is interested enough to attend, to feel that a hearty welcome and every attentiou possible will be proffered. Those desiring entry blanks can get them either at this office, of Mr. J. B. Martin 123 California street or of Mr. H. H.Briggs 609 Saora- menta street. George N. Ferguson Dead. Vigilant, in the N, Y. Spirit makes the following reference to a turfman who was among the prominent old-timers in California. On my return to the city, lately, I was grieved to learn that Mr. Geo. N. Ferguson had gone to his rest about three weeks ago. He was born in 1826, near Albany, N. Y., and took to trainiug trotting horses in early life, having rode a race against Hiram Woodruff, over the Red House track, many years ago. He went to California in 1854, where he devel- oped and successfully drove some of the best horses in the country, among them the trotters New York and Gleucoe Chief. A gentleman who knew him then said: "He was the Dan Mace of the Slope." He returned East in I860 and opened a stable in Forty-sixth street, this city. Stayed there until 1875, when he opened the stable on Fifty-second street, which he christened "The San Francisco," and made it a model one for boarding fast roadsters. During the last eigh- teen years, having an able lieutenant in his son Frank, Mr. Ferguson continued his business as trainer and driver, hand- ling Kansas Chief, Needle Gun, Lady Banker, James H. Burke, whom I saw drop dead on the Buffalo track, Crown Prince, J. G. Todd, afterwards called Frank Ferguson, and Judge Scott, whose name was changed to CJoudman. He rode him in masterly style, beating Johnny Reb in harness, at Fleetwood. Mr. Ferguson was also a clever business man. No one ever heard a coarse word escape from his lips, and his company was sought by men of refinement and good breeding. His memory will be fondly cherished while those who knew him live. His son Frank continues the business of the estate. New Arrivals. Mr. Robert Neal, of this city, has recently imported from the kennel of W. N. Callender, near Albany, N. Y., an eleven months old Irish red setter dog puppy. It is by old Rory O'More, and out of Nora Callenders. The pup is rather light in frame and perhaps a little too fine in coat, and with short- ish ears, but is a grand specimen. Mr. Charley Reading has also received an Irish red, Duke, a two-year-old dog, straining to Elcho, Plunkett, Frisk and Kathleen. Duke's sire is Colgate's Pat; his dam Howe's Gypsey. Gypsey is by Montague out of Nora, a sister to Pat. Rather close breeding, but Duke is a strong, hearty dog, and promises well. Duke is three-eighths Elcho and one-eighth Plunkett. The California Coursing Club will hold its usual fall cour- sing meeting at Merced on November Sth and 9th, leaving San Francisco by special cars on Wednesday, Nov. 7th, at 4 p. M. On this occasion the club's gold challenge cup, now held by Carroll's Paul Jones and Monarch, will be up for competition. This gold cup is tne handsomest coursing tro- phy ever competed for in America, It can be seen on exhibi- tion in the jewelry store on the northwest corner of Geary and Kearny streets. The California Club members are a jolly lot and always make it a point of honor to pay every possible attention to their guests. The trip is a very pleasant one, and above all is very inexpensive. Mr. Clem. Dixon recently received from England a very handsome Fox terrier bitch, about 14 pounds in weight. She is well put up, very symmetrical and all that a fox terrier should be, from the long clean bite to the strong, stumpy tail. She is not of the toy stock, but comes from the old vermin killing strain, peculiar to the fox hunting kennels of the north and west of England, where the fox terrier is always used to drive out the fox when he bolts the earth. Such a bitch as Mr. Dixon's can kill rats against any dog near her size, draw a badger, or vanquish a weasel, stoat or any ground vermin. The strain she comes from is well known in England and has taken many prizes. Mr. Thos. Bennett, of this city, has entered his famous dog Regent in the Pacific Coast Club's Trials, and has also joined the Club. Every ownerof a superior dog should do likewise. The Derby of this year should start Mr. Upham's puppy, Mr. Neal's Pat O'More, Mr. Ben Burton's Young Irishman, Mr ivn Burling's brace of juvenile Celts and several more marked pups. The San Joaquin County Coursing Club will hold a cour- sing match at Sargent's ranch, on the 12th of November. A dog in Washington County, Ohio, cured himself of a rattlesnake bite by burying himself up to the ears in mud. THE RIFLE. Sunday at Shell Mound. The members of the Second Regiment, N. G. C, held their third shoot for places on the Centennial Team, at Shell Mound Park last Sunday. The following will compose the team, they having obtained the highest percentage in the three shoots: Messrs. Lohmeyer, Lods, Mangels, Kuhls, Warren, Laufenberg, Snow, Fennell, Lempke and Sprowl. The following was the score: SECOND REGIMENT. Lieut. Lonmeyer, Co. D {S3 ?SES £3] ~⢠mâ¢*i-*oo.a {SffijSzg 53} -"'J Ident.Ma.gelB, Co. 0 iSS^lS £3} ~J1S crt w,â, ca D |200yds-29 30-591 .â igt. Wagner, Go. 1} (500 ydsâ31 28â59 ( _U8 Private Knhls Co C 1200 yds-29 31-60| . Private B.noi8, LO. t, |500yds-28 28-56} _11G Sgt. Snow, staff. Sgt. Fennel, ( 200 ydsâ28 toOO yde-30 co. c !â¢^r27 |500 ydsâ26 Sgt.Sturke,Co.D { gjj $£* -57) -54 | -49) Sgt. Lempke Cn n â f 200 yds-28 W)* u 1500 ycs-2C Lieut. Sprowl, staff { 23 j£-S 24-50 f 28â57 1 29-01 f The members of Company D, Second Artillery, also held a shoot. The following are some of the principal scores: COMPANY D, SECOND ARTILLERY. 44553434 4-40 4444444 3 4-39 5 4-4453 3 2 4 4 4 5 5 3 4 4 5 3â38 4â38 4-37 5-37 4â37 33443444 4-36 5â3fi 3-35 â 34 3 4 4 4 3 4 4434 3 434 5444*3204 2 3 4 4 4 3- Private Wm. Thurke, 200 yds 4 Sergeant W. F. Kattleman 4 Captain P. Heinmann 3 Sergeant H. J. Wagner 4 Lieutenant J. C. Lohmeyer 4 Private E. Epsen 4 Private R. Specter 4 Private W. A. Schnoor 3 Corporal F. Smith 3 Lieutenant G. F. Reck S Corporal J. F. O'Donnell 4 Private D. Scbnibbe 3 Privates. Knoop 2 Corporal J. Wagner 0 Sergeant J. F. Meissner 4 Private Geo. Hammon 4 Private O. F. Meldon 0 The following were the prize-winners on the public target: First-Kuhls, S20 11 12-23 SecondâBee kuian, SI 2 50 ThirdâCum mi ngs, $10 FourthâErbin. $7 50 FifthâMangels, $5 SixthâGarms. S2 50 SeventhâNewmann, 51 50 4 5 3 5 4 4â33 3-33 3-31 3â31 4â30 12-20 9â19 10-18 8-17 9â17 10â13 George Thaxter, previous to his departure for California, shot a score over the Carson range, making 47 at the 200 and 48 at the 500, giving a total of 95, says the Carson Tribune: "If he does as well at Shell Mound he'll walk off with the prize. ^^^___^____ George H. Hosmei feels aggrieved over John A. Kennedy's remarks about the former's three-mile performance at Hultou, Pa., and concludes a lengthy harrangne in the Boston //- ra hi by challeuging both Kennedy and Wallace Boss. We give space to Hosmers words: "lean row an accurately measured three-mile course on perfectly still water much faster than I rowed the three1mile course at Hnlton. I know I can, for I rowed three miles under twenty minutes on the Raritan Canal, Princeton, last Spring, and several of the Princeton boys, whom I was training, held watches on me. However, if John Kennedy feels aggrieved because the referee and judges i>f Price's regatta have given me credit for breaking the record, I will try to comfort him by offering to row him over the Hultou or any other fair course, distance three miles, as soon as he desires after the ice breaks up in the lakos and rivers, the match to be for $1,000 or $2,000 a side, as may be agreed upon. Then we, as well as the public, can judge who is en- titled to the record and who is the better sculler." Continu- ing, Hosmer says: "I want to be on good terms with every- body, but it provokes me when men like Ross say what they have of me. I have heard that Ross said the accident to my boat in the final heat of the professional race at Hull not so much an accideuffas I would have pi Well, if Wallace thinks I lost that race from any cfl accident, I am open to row him three milesforuny amount of money, within any reasonable time.

  

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Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsma411902sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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THE BAYWOOD STUD THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAI- (Property of John Pabrott, Esq.) Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of High Stepping- Hackney-Bred Harness Horses WALTER SEALY, Manager. I NOTICE TO SPORTSMEN. Your attention is respectfully called to the following: SKINNER'S HAND LOADED CARTRIDGES New Stock DECOY DUCKS, Painted Properly. Pure Gum GOSSAMER COATS, warranted. CREEDMOOR SPECIAL SHOOTING SHOES as-Send for Catalog-^fi H. E. SKINNER CO., 801 Market St., S. F. Southwest Corner of Fourth and Market Streets. BALLISTITE WINS From the distance handicap of 21 yards, at the Consolidated Sportsmen's Tournament, Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept. 4 and 5, 1902, breaking 416 out of 455 Targets. The only powder to average over 90 per cent for the entire shoot. â WINS Cincinnati dun Club's Grand Handicap, from the 21-yard mark, scoring 97 out of the 100 Targets, also AVINNING Second General Average for the three days, averaging 92$" per cent, from the distance handicap of 2l yards. Cincinnati. Ohio, Sept. 23, 24 and 25, 1902, Mr. J. M. Hughes, an amateur, usine 25 grains Ballistic, 1J ounce 7} chilled in 2J inch shell, regular factory load, establishes this record for distance handicaps. I H I All A PO 75 CHAMBERS ST,, NEW YORK CITY \J. Mtm LMU \JV wWi Telephone 1747 Franklin. Importers and Dealers in Fire Arms, Ammunition and Fencing Goods. Sole Agents for BALLISTITE AND EMPIRE SMOKELESS POWDERS. A postal brings "Shooting Facts." (Second Edition.) HAZARD BLACK RIFLE POWDER SHOTGUN SMOKELESS SjULand SMOKELESS RIFLE Always Popular and Always Perfect. ALANSON H. PHELPS, Agent, 431 MARKET STREET, - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. GIBBS' CELEBBATED PROGESS OF BAPID TAXIDERMY In Practical Use Over Twenty-Five Years. Used Everywhere In America. Hundreds of Testimonials. Try and Be Convinced. Start a Class. Money In It. Be Your Own Taxidermist. Naturalists, Collectors, Gunners, Anglers, Outers, Boys, Girls, and all others interested In nature and anxious to preserve the speoimens taken in wood and field, have all felt the need of a simple method of preservation, which is free from intricacies and inexpensive. There is a method of rapid taxidermy now in extensive use, which meets the requirements of all amateurs who wish a practical and inexpensive method of preserving the trophies of the outing and collecting trip. This is not the old system of so-called stuffing, so expensive, laborious and disap- pointing, but is a rapid system, which anyone can learn at once and which is guaranteed to give satisfaction. By this process you may preserve the beautiful plumage of the grouse and woodcock, or the pike's or buck's head, or the showy feathers of the tanager. Boys, girls and all others can do good work and may make money, as mounted heads and birds find a ready sale, and besides you may teach your friends and decorate the school-room, office and dining-room with native birds and other attractions. If you are in doubt, then get your friends to go in with you ani start a class, for when several work together there is an advantage and the expense is next to nothing. On the receipt of $1, cash or stamps, I will send full printed instructions for mounting birds, heads, mammals, etc , and ail materials for mounting and preserving speoimensâincluding prepared compound, together with full directions for dressing skins with the hair on for rugs and robes, so that you will not be to the expense of one cent. Remember, I Guarantee Satisfaction or Money Refunded. Mention Breeder and Sportsman and address MORRIS GIBBS. M. D., Kalamazoo, Mich. PORTABLE SH00TINQ BOXES BUNGALOWS KEADT TO LIVE IN Durable, Convenient, Moderate In cost Catalogues and Prices by mall. BURNHAM-STAND EFORD COMPANY Corner First and Washington Sts , Oakland BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. HOLSTEINSâWinners of every 7 days' butter contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 4-yr.,3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., S. F. JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS. Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- lished 1876. William Niles & Co.-Los Angeles, Gal. AYRSHIRESâYoung Bulls, Cows and Heifers. Registered. From prize winning families. Brown & Brandon, Petaluma, Cal. Absorbiue REMOVES Capped Hock, Thoroughpin, Wind=Puffs and all Soft Bunches without Removing the hair or throwing the horse out of work. $2 per bottle, delivered. YOUNG, P. D. F., Springfield, Mass. For sale by Mack & Co., Langleyft Michaels Co. Redington & Co., J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerron all ol San Francisco. ADOffSFOORâ¢^ means disordered digestion and if not promptly attended to will develop into chronic dyspepsia. Sergeant's Condition Pills will improve the appetite by strengthening the stom- ach, and cure indigestion, general debility, nervous- ness, and all disorders arising from impaired digestion. The Pills are a scientific remedy and the standard alterative and tonic in the treatment of Distemper, Mange, Fevers and General Debility. Of dealers, 50c. and $1.00. By mail, prepaid. Sergeant's "Sure Shot" rids the Dog and Puppy of worms. Price, 50 cents. Mailed free anywhere. Sergeant's Carbolic " Soft Soap." is the only right kind made. 25c. of dealers. By mail, 85c. Our Dog Treatise, revised, and Pedigree blank will be sent on receipt of an order or 3c. in stamps. Our goods for sale by "All Druggists and Sporting Goods Dealers." F1. W. BRAUN & CO., *-= LOS ANGELES, CAU. PaciGc Coast Supply I>epot.

 

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O. DAJTCEL. HELM H. T. SPRATTS PATENT. DOG NEWARK, N. J. CAKES REMEDIES SOAP. Send for free copy of " DOG CULTURE.1 Pacific Coast Branchâ1334 Valencia Street, San Francisco Agents for "SANITAS" Disinfectant. ST. LOUIS, MO. KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS. Twentieth Annual Trials OF THE Pacific Coast Field Trials Club TO BE SUN AT Bakersfield (KEEN COUNTY) Commencing Monday, Jan. 12,1903 Members' Stake Annual Derby All-Aged Stake Champion Stake Entries for All.Aged Stake close Dec. 15,1902 J. E. TERRY (Sacramento), President. ALBERT BETZ, Secretary. No. 201 Parrott Bldg., S. F., Cal. £®*For Entry Blanks and information address the Secretary. TWO GOOD ONES. T HAVE TWO WELL-BRED GREYHOUNDS â¢*- for sale. A puppy, 16 months old, by Rocker out of Mountain Beauty, and Brlarroot, 6 years, by Hadiwist out of Lady Lowe. These Are Prospective Winners. A rare chance. Apply to A. ROY HARRISON, 78 Geary street, San Francisco. FOR SALE. Smooth Fox Terriers. INCLUDING Norfolk Trneman, Imelda, lone, Isabelie, Elmwood Vassar, etc. Terms N. H. HICKMAN, reasonable. 1767 Page St., San Francisco Wandee Kennels' Fox Terriers, WANDEE BLIZZARD, formerly Lithian Bliz- zard (Blizzard-Pop). Fee 830 WANDEE REVELRY, formerly Saltscar Rev- elry (Saltscar Gambler-Saltscar Cheerful). Fee 825 WANDEE JESTER (Norfolk Velocity-Norfolk Two Step). Fee 810 Puppies and Brood Bitches for sale. Dogs shown by appointment only. Address WANDEE KENNELS, 814 Harrison St., San Francisco, Cal. CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisements under this head one cent per word per insertion. Cash to accompany order. ENGLISH SETTEES. TpOR SALEâBLUE BELTON ENGLISH J- Setter bitch. Gabilau Lady, two years old, by Luke C.-Naucy Hanks, full sister toBuckwa; good retriever, partly broken on field work. Al o, two bitches and one dog. four months old, by Count Danstone (Ch. Count Gladstone IV-Dan's Lady); bluebelton and black, white and tan mark- ings. Address GABILAN KENNELS, Hollister, California. BULL TERRIERS. -C<OR SALEâTWO CHAMPION WOODCOTE *- Wonder puppies. One Champion Banjo young dog. One brood bitch, prize winner. Address Kennel Editor. COCKER SPANIELS. pOR SALEâCOCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES " by Ch. Hampton Goldie. Apply at junction old county and Redwood roads. Fruitvale, Alameda â VTAIROD KENNELSâA FEW SPECIAL BAR- -^ gains in puppies, young bitches, and bitches in whelp, to make room. Finely bred stock. The prize-winning Cocker, Plumeria Beau H, at stud. 123 Third Avenue, San Francisco. pLUMERIA COCKER KENNELSâAT STUD, -t Champion Hampton Goldie 53,100 (Champion Red Mack-Hampton Queen Readie). Goldie has sired more winners than all of our Coast dogs combined. See any bench show catalogue. Fee $20. Plumeria Tweedlepuncb (Champion Hamp- ton Goldie-Omo Girl). Fee §15 Young and ma- tured stock for sale. Our motto. "The Best." E. C. PLUME, 415 Third Ave., San Francisco. ST. BERNARDS. AT STUD CUBA OF KENWOOD (Glenbeigh Jr.âStella) SAM'S BOW (Plain SamâDolly Dee IT) STOCKDALE KENNELS K. M. DODGE, Manager, Bakersfield, Kern Co., Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken Dogs for sale. #» -BOOK ON- Dog Diseases How t o Feed Mailed Free to any address by the author, H. CLAY GLOVER, D. V. S., 1278 Broadway, New York. NAIROD KENNELSâA SINGLE BARGAIN in royally bred St. Bernard puppy. At stud, the noted Grand Master n, winner of many prizes and admittedly the best on the Coast. 123 Third Avenue. San Francisco. GREAT DANES. REAT DANE PUPPIES FOR SALE-BY * Blue Beard out of Maud S. Both sire and dam bench show wieners. Aoply to or address O. BERGSTEN, Center-street Station, Oakland, Cal. G fej RUSS HOUSE Montgomery, Pine & Bush Sts.

  

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Identifier: breedingtraining00butl

Title: Breeding, training, management, diseases & c. of dogs:

Year: 1877 (1870s)

Authors: Butler, Francis, 1810-1874. [from old catalog]

Subjects: Dog. [from old catalog]

Publisher: Brooklyn, D. S. Holmes

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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ite as much interest in the dogs. The only drawback to the enjoyment of the show was thedreadful howling that tilled the building and attimes almost prevented conversation. Mr,Berghs speech on Tuesday evening was in-audible six feet from where he stood. Thelarger dogs were, as a rule, dignified and quiet;but the petted darlings of the drawing-roomexpressed their anguish over their im.prisonmentand loss of home luxuries in tones that musthave pierced the very hearts of their fair own-ers. The show was in every sense a great success,and will probably prove to be the first of a longseries of such exhibitions. It was held underthe auspices of the Westminster Kennel Club, APPENDIX. 391 and for a first enterprise of the kind, the man.agement was noticeably free from annoj-ancesand mistakes. It lasted four days, and everyone who visited it was delighted and entertain-ed. But if the question of holding anotherbench show were left to the dogs, it woulddoubtless be rejected by a large majority.

 

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MK. JONESS SIBERIAN BLOODHOUND BRUNO. 392 APPENDIX THE BONES OF THE CANINE SKELETON. The tirst poition of the skeleton which claims our ;itten-tioii is the skull. The shape of this extremity is fumiliar toevery one, and differs in the various breeds, being moreelongated in the greyhound, for instance, than in the Bull-dog or Newfoundland, where it forms a well-rounded dome,witii a wide cranial cavity, or brain-pan. All that it isnecessary for the reader to note is — The General Configuration of the Skull and its differentshapes according to breed, bearing in mind that nearly allthe breeds are well developed as reganls brain-pan. The Nasal Bone, well developed in the dog. The Occipital Bone, also well developed. This portion ofthe dogs head is called the occiput. The Orbital Cavity of the E;je. The Superior Maxilla, or upper jaw. The Inferior Maxilla, or lower jaw. The teelli of thetwo jaws in the majority of breeds ouuht to meet evenly infront; in other breeds, as the Bull, the King

  

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Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsma391901sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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THE BAYWOOD STUD THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL (Property of John Pahrott, Esq.) Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of High Stepping Hackney-Bred Harness Horses VETERINARY. Ira Barker Dalziel VETERINARY DENTIST Fancy Carriage.Saddle and Road Horses for Sale Office and stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue. San Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. HERE'S AW OPPORTUNITY STANDARD BRED MARES AND FILLIES FROM $40 UP. Many of Them are Registered and Nearly All Can Be. Write for Prices and Particulars. The owner, Hon. JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, wants to sell them immediately. Is not in need of the money, but is getting too old (87) to keep on breeding Horses. Will sell one or more and will give any one a big bargain that will take them all This is the best opportunity ever offered in California to get big values for money. I>r. wm, W. Egan. M. E. C. V. S., P. E. V. M. S. VETERINARY SURGEON. Member of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- ment University of California: Ex-President of the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: Telephone West 128. BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. HOLSTKINS—Winners of every 7 days' butter contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F- H. Burke, 626 Market St., S. F. YEKBA BUENA JERSEYS—The best A. J C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henrj Pierce, San Francisco. Animals for sale. JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS. Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- lished 1876. William Niles & Co.. Los Angeles, Cal. Almeda C—Brown filly, foaled January, 1893. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Emma. Registered in VoL 13, Rule 7, as standard. Bred to Boodle Jr. Delight—Bay filly, foaled February 15, 1897. Sire, Eugineer; dam, Flossie. No marks. Bred to Boodle Jr. Bertha—Dark brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- brino; dam, Emma. Has not foaled yet. Belle-Black filly, foaled March 20, 1893. Sire, Alpheus Wilkes; dam, Lady Nelson. Bred to Boodle Jr. Trix—Black filly, foaled April 20,1899. Sire, Ecce; dam, Belle. Necessity—Light bay Ally, foaled February 22, 1897. Sire, Magenta: dam, Unique. Dora—Bay filly, foaled April 2, 1890. Sire. Reno; dam, Martha. Bred to Major. Epha—Bay Ally, foaled April 24.1892. Sire, Eugi- neer; dam, Puss. Registered in Vol. XIII. Bred to Boodle Jr. Elsie—Lightbay filly, foaled March 25, 1895. Sire, Boodle; dam, Mary C. Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. Eda—Chestnut sorrel filly, foaled April 19. 1895. Sire, Hambletonian Wilkes; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. Flossie—Brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam, Gray Eagle mare brought from Ken- tucky. Vol. XIII. Bred to Boodle Jr. Gabilan Girl—Brown filly foaled April 8, 1892. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Clara. Vol. XILT. Bred to Major Queen Bess-Brown filly, foaled April 3, 1900. Sire, Boodle Tr.; dam, Gabilan Girl. Little Ora—Brown filly, foaled March 17, 1897 Sire, Eugineer; dam Lilly B. Jane—Bay mare Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam Ballot Bos. Bred to Major Jnanita Bay filly, foaled March 26, 1896. Sire; Bay Rum; dam Lucky Girl. Bred to Boodle Jr Kitty S.—Sorrel filly, foaled April 22, 1900. Sire, Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Flossie. Flora—Bay filly, foaled February 24, 1892. Sire, Reno; dam. Lady Palmer. Bred to Major Fanchon—Bay tilly. foaled April 13, 1898 Sire, Ecce: dam, Jane. Lady Palmer—Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- brino; first dam by Luciona, he by Whipple Hambletonian. Vol. XIII, Rule, 7. Bred to Major. Llldine—Bay filly, foaled March 28, 1894. Sire, Boodle; dam Gabilan Maid. Vol. Xnx, Rule. VI. Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. AUegra—Bay filly, foaled April 27, 1899. Sire, Ecce; dam Jane. Martha—Bay mare. Sire, Mambrino Jr.; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to Major. Lilly B—Black mare (16 hands). Sire. Homer dam. Maggie Lee Registered as standard in Vol VI Bred to Major Lncky Girl—Bay filly, foaled May 24, 1889 Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam, Flossie. Bred to Boodle Jr. Miss Judy—Bay filly, foaled April 4,1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Jane- Nancy—Bay mare. Sire. Mambrino Jr.; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. Peerless—Bay filly, foaled April 5. 1891. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Jane. Bred to Major. Comfort—Brown filly, foaled May 25,1898. Sire, Magenta; dam Janet. Surprise—Brown mare. Sire, Abbotsford, son of Woodford Mambrino; first dam. Minnie by Ladd's Kentucky Hunter. Bred to Boodle Jr. Sausal Maid—Dark brown Ally, foaled January 8. 1892. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Flossie. Vol. XIII, Rule VI. Bred to Boodle Jr. Taddie J.-Sorrel filly, foaled April 2. 1896 Sire, Bay Rum; dam, Mary C. Bred to Boodle Jr. Mary C—Bay mare, foaled April 8, 1898. Sire, Antevolo 7648; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. Ruby M.—Bay filly, foaled March 28, 1898. Sire, Ecce; dam, Flora Jenny "Wren—Bay filly, foaled April 21, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr,; dam. Flora. Claire—Bay filly, foaled May 10.1899. Sire, Punch: dam. Lady St Clair Beatrice Golden—Chestnut sorrel filly, foaled April 20, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.: dam, Lady Corns tock Jr. Ontario—Bay filly, foaled April 21, 1898. Sire, Magenta; dam. Lucky Girl. Miss Nobody—Gray filly, foaled March 26, 1897. Sire, Magenta: dam, Martha. Julia Dean—Bay filly, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, Ecce: dam, Martha. Pobrecita—Black filly, foaled April 9, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Martha. Helen Gould—Bay filly, foaled March 29, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Miss Beauty. Miss Nan—Dark gray filly, foaled March 6, 1897. Sire, Magenta; dam, Nancy. Delta—Dark bay filly, foaled March 21, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Nancy. Queen Mab—Sorrel filly, foaled April 11, 1900. Sire, Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Nina B. Little Dorrlt—Gray filly, foaled March 14, 1897. Sire, Magenta; dam, Rita V. Adelaide—Dark gray filly, foaled February 20, 1897. Sire, Magenta, dam. Surprise. Evening Star—Black filly, foaled March 28, 1898. Sire, Magenta; dam, Sausal Maid. AYRSHIRES—Young Bulls. Cows and Heifers. ; Registered. From prize winning families. ; SHORTHORNS—Of the famous Golden Drop , family. All stock registered and sold on both I blood lines and individuality. Brown & Brandon, Petaluma, Cal. Address JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, Cal. ASTHMA CURE FREE! Asthmalene Brings Instant Relief and Permanent Cure in All Cases. Sent Absolutely Free on Receipt of Postal. There is nothing like Asthmalene. It brings instant relief, even in the worst cases. It cures when all else fails. The Rev. C. F. Wells, of Villa Ridge, 111., says: " Your trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good condition. I can- not tell you how thankful I feel for the good derived from it. I wa9 a slave, chained with putrid sore throat and asthma for ten years. I despaired of ever being cured. I saw your ad- vertisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting dis- ease, asthma, and thought you had overspoken yourselves, but resolved to give it a trial. To my astonishment the trial acted like a charm. Send me a full-size bottle " We want to send to every sufferer a trial treatment of Asthmalene, similar to the one that cured Mr. Wells. We'll send it by mail POSTPAID, ABSOLUTELY FREE OF CHARGE, to any sufferer who will write for it, even on a postal. Never mind, though you are despairing, however bad your case, Asthmalene will relieve and cure. The worse your case, the more glad we are to send it. Do not delay. Write at once, addressing DR. TAFT BROS.' MEDICINE CO., 79 East 130th St., N. Y. City. Sold by all-Druggists. SUNSET LIMITED One of the most magnificent trains ever built. For 1901-1902 tki-weekly via Coast Line and Sunset Route for NEW ORLEANS and NEW YORK Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p m. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays Leave LOS ANQELES 8:30 a, m Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p m. Thursdays, Saturdays. Mondays Among the world's noted High- ways of Travel not one equals the route of this train. Get the little book, "Wayside Notes," from any agent of the SOUTHERN PACIFIC Initial trip of Sunset Limited Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco CURED BY Absorbing lr,4iJl

 

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A patient writes : He was thrown from his bi- cycle, wrenching his knee. Within a few hours the pain was so bad he could not use the limb. He ap- plied ABSORBINE, JR. The next day he rode 42 miles without a sign of soreness. This unequalled Liniment costs only $1.00 per bottle by mail. MANT/FACTUHED BY W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., SPRINGFIELD, - • MASS. For sale by Mack & Co., LangleyA Michaels Co , Redlngton & Co , J. O'Kanc, and J. A. McKerrou, all of San Francisco. mm BUSINESS COLLEGE 24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 18,000 gradu- ates: 35 teachers: 60 typewriters; over 300 students annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue, E. F. HEALD, President KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS Nineteenth Annual Trials OF THE Pacific Coast Field Trials Club TO BE RUN AT Santa Maria SANTA BARBARA COUNTY Commencing Monday, Jan. 13,1902 Membe-s' Stake Annual Derby All-Aged Stake Champion Stake Entries ror All-Aged Stake close Dec. 15,1901 W. S. TEVIS. ALBERT BETZ. President. Secretary. No. 201 Parrott Balldg, S. F , Cal. 4»*For Entry Blanks and information address the Secretary. BULL TERRIER FOR SALE teddy roosevelt (Woodcote Venom-Rene) This handsome, prize-winning dog can be had at a bargain. For particulars address BYRON ER- KENBRECHER, Los Angeles, or Breeder and Sportsman, San Francisco. Boston Terrier BIlcl Popy tpOR XMAS. SIRE "TREMONT." FINE *- brindle: splendid markings. Address Mrs. H. H. CARLTON, Napa. On anything pertaining to Dogs in health or disease CONSULT ,_ A KLE|N Gen. Pac. Coast Agent Room 7, 420 Mont- Dr. Geo. W. Clayton's gomery St. (10 to 12 up-to-date Dog Medicines, a. m., 2 to 4 p. m.) Literature Free. San Francisco, Cal. Unsurpassed Kennel and Hospital accommoda- tions. Visits in andoutof town. Advice by mail. Twenty years1 experience in Europe and the East. AT STUD CUBA OF KENWOOD (Glenbeigh Jr.—Stella) SAM'S BOW (Plain Sam—Djlly Dee II) STOGKDALE KENNELS K. M. DODGE, Manager, BakerHfleld, Kern Do., Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken Dogs for sale. * Dog Diseases Hew to Feed. Mailed Free to any address by the author, H. CLAY GLOVER, D. V. S., 1278 Broadway, New York. ICTEDS^DOGS WITH MANGE 1 STANpARDJjjjNFECTANTCO. Cle>dond O

  

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U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Mustapha Mussa momentarily halts with an improvised explosive device detector dog while clearing a road here, Sept. 4. Mussa, a native of Michigan City, Ind., is the 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment kennel master and an advisor with the battalion's Embedded Training Team. Clearing roads was one of the many focuses of the five-day, battalion-sized clearing operation recently conducted in the Northern Battalion Security Area of 1/3's area of operations. The partnered operation focused on clearing roads and searching villages where the concentration of coalition forces is low.Regimental Combat Team-5, 1st Marine Division Public Affairs

Photo by Cpl. Colby Brown

Date Taken:09.04.2011

Location:GARMSIR DISTRICT, HELMAND PROVINCE, AF

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Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsman81886sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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1886 *?m itocacr ana j&iwxtsmair. 101 the reasons for suspecting that the judgment was prejudiced.' His reasons tor suspecting that the judgment was prejudiced are from plain and obvious facts, evident to all who witnessed the trials. Take the cases of the dogs Bion and Lemmie B. and Tom Pinch and Solano B. It was clear to every one but the judges that to Bion and Solano B. should have been awarded theheats. Eventhejudge, inhisofficialreport, givesBionfour points to Lemmie B.'s three, with the demerit of one false point. Again: ''The personality of a newspaper writer is of little interest to a reader," True, and that is why a newspaper writer, more particularly one intrusted with the management of an influential paper, should not cause that paper to be disgraced by using its influence exclusively in favor of a few of his own kennel friends. He should devote his talents to elevating the character of the sporting press, to treat all persons with fairness and impartiality, to know neither friends uor foes in the strict performance of his duties, to cease calling vulgar names and imputing improper motives to those who differ with him, and who probably knows more than he does, and to conduct his department with an uprightness of purpose that will give it weight and authority on all sporting subjects, whether equine or canine." Pointers and Pointers. "Blees'ee, a rabbit can hear'ee if you only winks your eye," said a poacher, who was lying in wait for a shot, to enforce silence on a boy beside him. And really the sense of hearing in animals is so cute that the words are not so hyperbolical as thev sound, as any showman who makes it his business to train them can testify. The learned pig, the conjuring pony, or the fortune-telling dog. who picks out a given card or a*certain person, as we have all seen him do at a fair or in a public house, simply depends npon his ear. First of all he is taught to walk in acircle, then to stop at the snict of the thumb and finger-nail, so lightly as to be inaudiable to any bat the animalâand the instant he hears it he stops dead or points at the card or individual he is then in front of. Talk about pointing, a Mr. Tanner, who lived in the Xew Forest, trained a pig to beat for game, and stand and back as staunch as the best pointer flog. Just before his death, this same gentleman had even made considerable progress in breaking in a deer to a similar performance. There was a man named John Parsons, who was called "Glass-leas," from the brittleness of those indispensable members,"of which he ultimately lost the use, and who was drawn about the fields in a light gig by a donkey which he used to declare would find a hare and then stand like a pointer-dog. A certain horse-dealer, hearing of this, took a pony to a neighboring Squire and declared that, like John's "donkey, it would find a hare and stand to it. The Squire, curious to see the experiment tiled, lode with the dealer to a place where the latter knew hares to abound, and being very quick at finding them, Spavin soon espied one. The pony had been carefully trained to pull np sharp at a touch of the spnr, and, this being given, he came to a dead stop and pricked up his ears. "There's a hare close by," cried Spavin, and sure enough, just at that moment out sprang puss from among some thick grass. The experiment was repeated, and the Squire was so well-pleased that he pur- chased the animal there and then, and mounted him to ride home upon, lending his horse to the dealer. In going over a bridge that rose toward the centre, the Squire tonched his steed with the spnr to quicken his pace; in a moment the pony halted with the precision of a soldier at the word of command. "What does that mean," said the Squire, doubtfully. "By gum, sir, he stood a trout," answered the quick-witted and artful Spavin. "If I'd knowel he'd stand a trout I wouldn't ha' sold him for double the money." After that the Squire, indeed, thought he had got a wonderful bargain. But you may have too much of a good thing, and when the pony pointed hares or trout in the most unaccountable places his owner very soon discovered the trick. Spavin was not again seen in that part of the country. âLie. Vict. Gazette. A Smart Dog. followed by hydrophobia. Of this fact a corresDondent men- tions two instauces, namely: Mr. Mây, late of" the B. C. S., was very badly bitten by a greyhound which had become furiously rabid; the dog then bit the swerper (mthter), and afterwards a donkey; the two latter both died raving mad with hydrophobia, but Mr. Mây never haf the slightest symptom of an attack. The second instance was that of a brother of mine, the late A. G. W. of the B. N. C. S. He was entrance, and a double staircase winding np on ei h r si t To the right are the reading-rooms, writing-rooms cafe and billiard-rooms: to the left the drawing-rooms and dining- rooms, and m a. rear extension is the beautiful, octagonal ball-room. The woodwork and carvings are all troui designs furnished by Mr. Braes Price, wh . has had general super- vision of the bnildlugo,por.,tions. A broad piazza to be in- siins"oi tti^^^^b^SS*5 maaness, my brother felt no anxiety in the matter. A few days afterwards, however, the dog become unmistakably rabid and was killed. Some weeks after this the wounds caused by the bites suddenly bec-iie inflamed and angry looking, and the doctor (a native) WBS SclJt ;ur, wh... without delay, cut out and cauterized the parts effected. Ilr. Wân entirely escaped an atlack from this dreadtul ma1-ly. We have mentioned these two cases in the BO] â - 'bat it mav be the means of preventing fear and despondency in any person who may have the misfortnne tjbe bitten by anyammsl suffering from rabies, for we have heard ibat anxietv, [eai and despondency have been known *o btiug on symptoms very analogous to hydrophobia, althonch, of course, not actually the disease itse'f. We have never heard of a human being being seized with hue hydrophobia spontaneously. In conclusion, we think it as v,e!l to mention what many persons are not aware of, that dogs suffering from rabies have no dread of water, but will driuk"it with avidity. ~" bia, therefore, as applied to dogs. Asian. is a misnomer A Duel Between a Mare and a Bull-Dog. .--â' I2S persons at tie '.me time, lhe kitchen arraignments are on a corresuoud- mgsce'e. Upstairs there are UK) V completely aT 1 testhetically famished as a woman'* b .udoir. Adjoining the club-house are the bowiing-allevs, with bachelor auan- rreuts overhead. « . ,- A broad terrace fringe 1 uith trees nine â¢utou" the nor'h shore of Tuxedo Lake is t. be usel a promeikide; and it is in. tended that a baud shall play [here in summer weather Grouped about behiu.i tue l rrace are some fifteen* or twentv cottages, of varied and picturesque design, vet all uarniouiz ing with the architecture of the inaiu buildinoa. Such, in brief, aie the elaborate ami _ i eul for creature eomfo.-ts indoors, but the real aim and Object of the club is to afford its members the best obtainable facilities for sport with gun and rod. To this eud the entire prone-ty hes been surrounded by a barbed wire fence eight feet higb the four lower feet being cat and dog proof. The list of game includes Hy.lropho- | deer, English pheasants. English partridges, woodcock, quail .-Calcutta and hare. The best woodcock ground in the countrv the â W arwrck Swamp, is jast to the south o' the like Game- keeper s cottages are scattered throaghoul the preserve^ and some of the stock is already in line condition. Tuxedo Lake was stocked by Mr. Loril ird s father mauv yeais ago with small-mouthed black bass, which have dour- A bull-dog and a young mare, belonging to a farmer, be- ; came engaged in a tight, in which the mare succeeded, after . "shed and multiplied until the fisbing is famous. The paads a hard-fought battie, in killing her adveisary. The two ani- ! and a section of the Kamapo river, which pa',-es thr. mals were stable companions, but the mare had a great dis-' P3rl,> "'U be stocked with English grayling auj rainbow like toward the dog, and worried him in every way she could. 1 Too', while other waters will be utilized for breeding Ger- One day the mare broke her halter, and seizing the dog with ma0 ?arP i°r '"it and food. Every kind of boat wiiT be at her teeth she began to shake it viciously. The dog, not lik- ! tDe disposal of sportsmen, with trained fishermen and boat- ing this kind of treatment, seized its enemy by the nose, and then followed a terrible fight. The dog shook itself loose from its foe and sprang at it, only to be kicked to the end of the barn. At last the dog succeeded in getting a grip on the mare's nose, and that was not loosened until the larger ani un- placed its forelegs on the body and tore itself away. A !ar:,e crowd had assembled to witness the fight, drawn by the wild neighs and barks of the combatants. The fight continued for about fifteen minutes, when suddenly the dog sunk its teeth in the foreleg of the mare, and in the latter's vain efforts to reach it with its mouth the horse fell directly on its foe and crushed the life out of him. As the mare rose from the body of the dog she gave a shrill neigh, and turned round and kicked the body into a shapeless mass. When informed of the fight the owner of the mare went immediately to the barn, and found his mare lying in its stall nearly dead from the loss of blood. The legs and neck of the brute were terri bly lacerated, aud its nose was entirely gone. It was impos- sible for the animal to live, and so she was shot. Conditioning Canines for Exhibition. A subscriber asks: What care and treatment should a fox- terrier receive to fit him for a showâas regards diet, treat- ment of coat, etc.? He is good looking, and I want to do him justice. How long before the show must I get to work on him? Answer.â We wonld advise two compound cathartic pills to be given in the early part of the dayâsay, two weeks prior to exhibition. When their action has been expended, keep under coarse beef soup, in which break up crackers, composed of one part linseed meal and eight parts graham flour, with bread and milk for a change, and an occasional bone. It would be advisable to give a warm water bath once a day, taking care to dry thoroughly with a soft towel; then brush lightly, and keep in a warm room for a conple of hours to secure freedom from taking cold. A short run during the warm part of the day would complete the treatment neces- sary, and insure sprightliness. men in attendance, andpriiate slaves, wagonettes, baggies and buck-boards can be ordered in a moment. In addition to the gamekeepers, a thoroughly organized police force will patrol the property, and a lock-up has been considerately provided for the accommodation of disor.le.lv characters. All the employees on the estate are to be appropriately uniformed. A charming little church overlooking tl - prevent Nature from being unduly worshippe . . L ler'sorchestra has been engaged to furnish swc*;; at s to the sound o! running waters. T ._ â .. , k-eboating, and all kinds of winter sports are to beprovi 1, an.i arrange- ments for pigeon shooting polo and'awn tennis have been entrusted to competent h.-uds. The Tuxedo Park Association is a coi puration, and Mr. Lonllard the owner of most of the stocs. He leases the house, grounds aud sporting privileges to the Tuxedo Club, and guarantees the members against loss f..r live years. The club is, therefore, a propriety club, with the rwnership vested in Mr. Lorillard. The membership is divide! into two classes, resident and non-resident members. The cor- teges referred *o are to be let to members oolv, and lau.! in fee simple will also be sold to members who des.ie to bud I. This sort of proprietorship constitut = a i ident member, aud their number is practically unlimited. Xau-r members are those who only use the clnb aotst re and their nnmberis limited to 200, and the li-tisalr< The initiation fee is S100 and the aunual dues 8100. Lev. n hundred men are now at work, aud the total upeudirnre will be nearly $l,C0O,C;3. The clnb will open ou Mav 20th, the end of the close season for black bass rishing. Capital Turf Club. A dog packing a lunch pail away from the school-house attracted the attention of one of the pupils in the grammar department the other day. The dog, which is the property of J. A. Whitaker.was observed to carry the pail down to the front gate of his master's premises, a short distance from the school-house, aud there set down his burden, claw the lid off and proceed to eat the contents of the pad. As it was after the lunch hour, the bucket contained but littleânot sufficient to satisfy his dogship's hunger. Taking the empty pail again in his mouth, he carried it into his master's yard and pnt it under the house. A second time he visited the school-house, and presently emerged with a second bucket, which he treated as the first. Stall not satisfied, he made a third trip and again took a bucket from the hallway and proceeded home- ward. Emboldened by his former success, he did not wait till he got home this time, but stopped on tue way to investi- gate the contents of his load. Tne lid of this bucket tit tightly and the dog clawed at it in vain. In the meantime, the pupil, who had been watching the performance from a window informed his teacher that a dog was carrying off all the dinner pails, so he was sent down stairs to see about it. In the hallway some thirty pails had been left by the pupils in the different departments, and among these the dog had evidently made his selections very carefully, picking out the heaviest ones, which was evidenced by the tact thjt a half dozen light pails had been carried as far as the front door and there left. The dog evidently knew he was doing wrong, else why should he hide the pails after eating their contents. He didn't want any evidence of bis guilt laying around. Smart dog!âlone Valley Echo. Prevention and Cure of Hydrophobia. Several articles have appeared in various papers regarding the prevention and cure of hydrophobia by inoculation with the virus of rabid animals, recently discovered by Professor Pasteur and there appears to be no doubt as to the succe-s which has attended his experiments. But in no case does a bona Me cure seem to have been effected when hydrophobia has become developed without the interven'.on of inocula- tion The two cases mentioned as having been cured can scarcely be considered satisfactory proofs. In one instance, the patientâa boy of nine years of ageâwas brought for treatment 60 hours only after being bitter mnch too short a time for theimvady to have developed; and in the second case, althon-b the man had been bitten tor a longer period silH he was not actually suffering from hydrophobia when brought for treatment; and both of them might have entirdy escapsd an attack, without recourse to inoculation, for, we imagine, it is well known that the bite oi a mad dog is not infallibly Dog owners will be glad to learn from Mr. Allen's adver- tisement, printed elsewhere, that they can procure "Spratt's" patent dog cakes. The biscuits are carefully prepared from beef meal aud beet root, or other laxative vegetable matter, and have proved excellent both for ordinary keunel use, and for shooting expeditions. By the addition of refuse soup, sour milk, whey or other stuff, the diet can be varied aud made attractive. Send to Mr. Alien for some of the cakes and try them. Mr. Lorillard's New Enterprise, The retirement of Mr. Pierre Lorillard from the turf calls general attention to a gentleman of whom it may be said that "the best is good enough for him." Many Americans have had equal opportunities with Mr. Lorillard for spending money, but he remains/Vc-iY-; princeps as an adept in knowing how to spend it. It has been second nature with him to have the best houses, the best yachts, the best cooks, the oest wines, the best horses, and the best lock on the turf. So much has been said and writteu about the Tuxedo Club which is incorrect, that the Star takes pleasure in giving the first correct account of this sportsmen's paradise that has been published. The remark of that farceur, Mr. Henry Draper, "that Tiffiuy has the contract for the fence," is a slight exaggeration but it will serve as a text in a description of an enterprise upon which money aud goad taste are being lavished ga'ore. Tuxedo Park is thirty-five miles from town, on theEiie road, and lies in the midst of most charming aud picturesque scenery, diversified by mouutiiu streams, bold bluffs, and long reaches of lake and pond, quite suggestive of the Adi- rondacks. The whole estate comprises 6.000 acres, and the site of the clab-house. which stands close to the lak*. is about 700 feet above the sea. The little village uf Tni which nestles under a mountain standing iminediatt ly i n .-, of the station, contains an English-looking inn in miniature, about fifteen Qaeen Anne cottages for the employees of the estat2s, a variety of shops, aud an elaborate stable wiih accomodations for 100 loorses. twenty-five of which are saddle horses, now in process ..f training. The lodge-gate stands near, and a winding macadam drive of a mile and'a quarter leads by gentle slopes np to the club-house. Tne grounds have beeu laid out by Mr. Bowditch, tbe well-known land- scape architect of Boston, who has been most Bnccessfnl iu preserving the Inxuriani wililness ol imtnre, iutersecti variety of well kept drives aud bridle-paths. The club-house itself is an elaborate three-story structure, built on massive stone buttresses, which are covered with Tbe Capital Turf Club of Sacramento is undergoing a re- organization. At a meeting held last Saturday evening.it was decided to reduce the membership fee to $10, and invite the citizens generally to enroll themselves as members. A Committee ou Canvass, consisting of A. J. Ehoades. Thos. Fox, H. M. Bernard, Frank Smith, A. J. Stemler, Geo. W. Carey, Col. Jas. McXasser, W. O. Bowers, E. G. Blessing and J. W. Wilson, was appointed, and the work thus fairly inaugurated. It appears to have been what theatrical managers call an "instantaueous success." At an adjourned meeting, held last Wednesday evening, the committee reported 13S names, with several districts yet to be heard from. A meeting will be held this (Saturday) evening, when officers will be elected aud prelimiu ry steps taken towards a spring racing meeting. For Sale. The Trotting-bred Stallion

 

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PRINCE ST3WART. Soil i.l A. . STKWAKT. Prince m v. irti. i I, â . leh white hind â â â One roadstar; I .-. m*. in in-, i p-liall hands high, and wel I - [tre-i by D. i Hi rris, ol P i] el â Hambrino; Blrrdbj Mambrtno Patchen, fall brother record, 2:18M: sire of Katie Middle tun, 2:23, and nine in J moss, the upper stories being finished in tbatchwoik and the | a Belmont mare; well bred, and could roof symmetrically gabled. The main ball in the centre is i Stewart oervt-i ⢠forty feet square, with an enormous fireplace opposite the uares Uet season, and Is â - Enquire eFO. I), si. Norfolk Stable, 1S6 KM

  

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Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsma401902sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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THE BAYWOOD STUD THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAU (Property of John Parrott, Esq.) Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of High Stepping Hackney-Bred Harness Horses VETERINARY. Ira Barker Dalziel VETERINARY DENTIST Fancy Carriage. Sad die and Road Horses for Sale Office and stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS HERE'S ANOPPORTUNITY STANDARD BRED MARES AND FILLIES FROM $40 UP. Many of Them are Registered and Nearly All Can Be. Write for Prices and Particulars. The owner, HON. JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, wants to sell them immediately. Is not in need of the money, but is getting too old (ST) to keep on breeding Horses, "Will sell one or more and will give any one a big bargain that will take them all This is the best opportunity ever offered in California to get big values for money Almeda C—Brown filly, foaled January, 1893. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Emma. Registered in VoL 13, Rule", as standard. Bred to Boodle Jr. Delight—Bay filly, foaled February 15. 1897. Sire, Eugineer; dam, Flossie. No marks. Bred to Boodle Jr. Bertha—Dark brown mare. Sire. Carr's Mam- brino; dam, Emma. Has not foaled yet. Belle—Black filly, foaled March 20, 1893. Sire, Alpheus Wilkes; dam, Lady Nelson. Bred to Boodle Jr. Trii—Black filly, foaled April 30,1899. Sire, Ecce; dam. Belle. Necessity—Light bay filly, foaled February 23, 1897. Sire, Magenta: dam, Unique. Dora—Bay filly, foaled April 2, 1890. Sire. Reno; dam, Martha. Bred to Major. Epha—Bay filly, foaled April 24. 1893. Sire, Eugi- neer; dam. Puss. Registered in Vol. ami. Bred to Boodle Jr. Elsie—Light bay fill v. foaled March 25, 1895. Sire. Boodle; dam, Mary C. Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. Eda—Chestnut sorrel filly, foaled April 19, 1895. Sire, Hambletonian Wilkes; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. Flossie—Brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam. Gray Eagle mare brought from Ken- tucky. Vol. Xin. Bred to Boodle Jr. Gabilan Girl—Brown filly foaled April 8, 1892. Sire. Gabilan; dam, Clara. Vol. XTTT. Bred to Major Queen Begs—Brown filly, foaled April 3, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Gabilan Girl. Little Ora—Brown filly, foaled March 17, 1897. Sire, Eugineer; dam Lilly B. Jane—Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam Ballot Bos. Bred to Major Juanita Bay filly, foaled March 26. 1896. Sire, Bay Rum; dam Lucky Girl. Bred to Boodle Jr. Kitty S.—Sorrel filly, foaled April 22, 1900. Sire, Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Flossie. Flora—Bay filly, foaled February 24, 1892. Sire, Reno; dam, Lady Palmer. Bred to Major- Fanchon—Bay filly, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, Ecce; dam, Jane. Lady Palmer—Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- brino; first dam by Luciona, he by Whipple Hambletonian. Vol. NTTT , Rule, 7. Bred to Major. Llldlne—Bav fllly, foaled March 28, 1894. Sire, Boodle; dam Gabilan Maid. Vol. mi., Rule, VL Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. Allegra—Bay fllly, foaled April 27, 1899. Sire, Ecce; dam Jane. Martha—Bay mare. Sire, Mambrino Jr.; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to Major. Lilly B—Black mare (16 hands). Sire, Homer dam, Maggie Lee Registered as standard in Vol VI. Bred to Major Lucky Girl-Bay fllly, foaled May 24, 1889 Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam, Flossie. Bred Boodle Jr. Miss Judy—Bay fllly, foaled April 4,1900 Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Jane. Nancy—Bay mare. Sire. Mambrino Jr.; dam Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. Peerless—Bay fllly, foaled April 5, 1891. Sire Gabilan; dam. Jane- Bred to Major. Comfort—Brown fllly, foaled May 25,1898. Sire Magenta: dam. Janet. Surprise—Brown mare. Sire, Abbotsford, son of Woodford Mambrino; first dam. Minnie by Ladd's Kentucky Hunter. Bred to Boodle Jr. Sausal Maid—Dark brown filly, foaled January 8. 1892. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Flossie. Vol. XTJI, Rule VI. Bred to Boodle Jr. TaddieJ.—Sorrel fllly, foaled April 2, 1896 Sire, Bay Rum; dam, Mary C. Bred to Boodle Jr. Mary C.—Bay mare, foaled April 8, 1898. Sire. Antevolo 7648; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. Ruby M.—Bay fllly, foaled March 28.1898. Sire, Ecce: dam, Flora. Jenny Wren—Bay fllly, foaled April 21. 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr,; dam. Flora. Claire—Bay fllly, foaled May 10.1899. Sire, Punch: dam. Lady St. Clair Beatrice Golden—Chestnut sorrel flllv, foaled April 20, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.: dam. Lady Comstock Jr. Ontario—Bay fllly, foaled April 21. 1898. Sire, Magenta; dam, Lucky Girl. Miss Nobody—Gray fllly, foaled March 26, 1897. Sire, Magenta: dam, Martha. Julia Dean—Bay filly, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, Ecce; dam, Martha. Pobrecita—Black filly, foaled April 9, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Martha. Helen Gould—Bay fllly, foaled March 29, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam. Miss Beauty. Miss Nan—Dark gray fllly, foaled March 6,1897. Sire, Magenta: dam, Nancy Delta—Dark bay filly, foaled Maich 21, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Nancy. Queen Mab—Sorrel filly, foaled April 11, 1900. Sire, Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Nina B. Little Dorrit—Gray filly, foaled March 14, 1897. Sire, Magenta: dam. Rita V. Adelaide—Dark gray filly, foaled February 20, 1897. Sire, Magenta, dam. Surprise. Evening Star—Black filly, foaled March 28,1898. Sire, Magenta; dam, Sausal Maid. Address JESSE D. GABS, Salinas, Cal. ASTHMA CURE FREE! Asthmalene Brings Instant Relief and Permanent Cure in AH Cases. Sent Absolutely Free on Receipt of Postal. There is nothing like Asthmalene. It brings instant relief, even in the worst cases. It cures when all else fails. The Rev. C. F. Wells, of Villa Ridge, 111., says: "Your trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good condition. I can- not tell you how thankful I feel for the good derived from it. I was a slave, chained with putrid sore throat and asthma for ten years. I despaired of ever being cured. I saw your ad- vertisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting dis- ease, asthma, and thought you had overspoken yourselves, but resolved to give it a trial. To my astonishment the trial acted like a charm. Send me a full-size bottle " We want to send to every sufferer a trial treatment of Asthmalene, similar to the one that cured Mr. Wells We'll send it by mail POSTPAID, ABSOLUTELY FREE OF CHARGE, to any sufferer who will write for it, even on a postal. Never mind though you are despairing, however bad your case, Asthmalene will relieve and cure. The worse your case, the more glad we are to send it. Do not delay Write at once, addressing DR. TAFT BROS.' MEDICINE CO., 79 East 130th St N. Y. City. Sold by all;Druffgists.

 

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IDr*. w xxl, F\ ZETgaii. M. K. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. VETERINARY SCRGEON. Member of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. England; Fellow of the Edinburg Veterinary Medical Society: Graduate of the New Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- ment University of California; Ex-President of the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: Telephone West 128. BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. HOLSTEINS—Winners of every 7 days' butter contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 4-yr., 3-yr. and 3-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams competing. 5th year myHolsteins have beaten Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. H. Burke, 626 Market St., S. F. TEKBA BUENA JERSEYS-The best A. J C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henrj Pierce, San Francisco. Animals for sale. JERSEYS, HOI>STKINS AND DURHAHS. Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- lished 1876. William Niles & Co. Los Angeles, Cal. AYR SHIRES—Young Bulls. Cows and Heirers Registered. From prize winning families. SHORTHORNS—Of the famous Golden Drop family. All stock registered and sold on both blood lines and individuality. Brown & Brandon, Petaluma, Cal. SUNSET LIMITED One of the most magnificent trains ever built. For 1901-1902 tri-weekly via Coast Line and Sunset Route for NEW ORLEANS and NEW YORK Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p m. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays Leave LOS ANGELES 8:30 a. m Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p m. Thursdays, Saturdays. Mondays Among the world's noted High- ways of Travel not one equals the route of this train. Get the little book, " Wayside Notes," from any agent of the SOUTHERN PACIFIC Initial trip of Sunset Limited Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco Nineteenth Annual Trials OF THE Pacific Coast Field Trials Club TO BE RDX AT Santa Maria SANTA BAKBARA COUNTS Commencing Monday, Jan. 13,1902 Membe-s' Stake Annual Derby All-Aged Stake Champion Stake Entries rorAU-Aged Stake close Dec. 15,1901 W. S. TEVIS. ALBERT BETZ, President. Secretary. No. 201 Parrott Bnildg, S. F , Cal. «*-For Entry Blanks and information address the Secretary. On anything pertaining to Dogs in health or disease cossr" L. A. KLEIN. Room 7, 420 Mont- gomery St. (10 to 12 to 4 P. M.) Gen. Pac. Coast Agent Dr. Geo. W. Claytons up-to-date Dog Medicines. LiteratureFree. San Francisco",'Cal' Unsurpassed Kennel and Hospital accommoda- tions. Visits in andoutof town. Advice bv mail Twenty years' experience in Europe and the East AT STUD CUBA OF KENWOOD (Glenbelgh Jr.—Stella) SAM'S BOW (Plain Sam—D)Uy Dee II) STOCKDALE KENNELS K. M. DODGE, Manager, Bakerafleld, Kern Co., Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken Dogs for sale. #* Dog Diseases o "tot to r*e©TTH5T-V*.D4RDO!LOf TAB f&STAHDAJtDDiAIMTCTAM CO. Cl,-.;'^ Without the KNIFE You can remove Soft Bunches like Goitre, Tumors, Gangloin, Bursal Enlargements, etc. WITH Absorbine, Jr. Pleasant to use. Highly perfumed. $ 1.00 per bottle by mail. Describe your case fully. Address W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., SPRINGFIFXD, - m MASS. For sale by Mack&Co., Langley& Michaels Co , Redington & Co., J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerroii, all of San Francisco. [MfliU BUSINESS COLLEGE 24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 18,000 gradu- ates; 25 teachers: 60 typewriters; over 3C0 students annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue. E. P. HEAtD, Preslden H. F. LORQUIN TAXIDERMIST Dealer in Naturalists' Supplies CCIEXTTFIC MOUNTDCG OF BIRDS. RUGS, ^ Heads, Animals, Fishes, Reptiles, Insects 319 Kearny St. (upstairs) San Francisco. Phone. Black 5332

  

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Identifier: newbookofdogcomp01leig

Title: The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: Leighton, Robert, 1859-1934

Subjects: Dogs

Publisher: London New York : Cassell

Contributing Library: Webster Family Library of Veterinary Medicine

Digitizing Sponsor: Tufts University

  

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hem. The puppies are usuallywalked by the young sportsmen at theirhomes, and a prize is given every winterhalf for the best walked Beagle. Theappointment of the Master used to restwith the Captain of the Boats, but thiscustom has fallen into abeyance. He actsas huntsman and is assisted by three whips.All four wear brown velveteen coats, andsome seventy boys are allowed to run withthem. There were at one period two packs,a Colleger and an Oppidan, but they wereamalgamated in 1866, and now any boymay put his name down to join, his admis-sion being determined by the Master. Thesubscription is thirty shillings, reduced tofifteen shillings at half-term. The Beaglesrun every half-holiday during the Easterhalf, and there is usually a good field. Beagles are not always looked upon withfavour by the authorities at Eton, andattempts have occasionally been made tostop the sport; but it is well disciplined,and there is no doubt that it provides anexcellent training for our future Fox-hunters. 23^

 

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POINTERS AT SCHOOL ON THE MOORS.Photograph by C. Rcid, Wishaw. CHAPTER XXIII.THE POINTER. BY G. S. LOWE. Sportsman, sir? asked Mr. Jingle, abruptly turning to Mr. Winkle A little, sir, replied that gentleman. Fine pursuit, sir, fine pursuit. Dogs, sir ? Not just now, said Mr. Winkle. Ah ! you should keep dogs—/;;/: animals—sagacious creaturesPointer—surprising instinct. ■dog of my own once—Pickwick Papers. IT has never been made quite clear inhistory why the Spaniards had a dogthat was very remarkable for pointingnil kinds of game. They have always beena pleasure-loving people, certainly, butmore inclined to bull-fighting than field-craft, and yet as early as 1600 they musthave had a better dog for game-findingthan could have been found in any otherpart of the world. Singularly enough, too,the most esteemed breeds in many countriescan be traced from the same source, suchas the Russian Pointer, the German Pointer,the French double-nosed Griffon, and. farmore important still,

  

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Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsma171890sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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1890 %\tt %xzt&tx atid j^wcismatj. 515 THE KENNEL Dog owners are requested to Bend for publication tbe earliest possi- ble notices of whelps, sales, names claimed,presentations and deaths, In their kennels, in all Instances writing plainly names of sire and dam And of grandparents, colors, dates and breed. Fixtures- BENCH SHOWS. Northern Illinois Poultry and Pet Stock Association's fifth annual bench Bhow, Rockford, ill., December 10, II, 12, 13, 14, IB and 16, John Teague Secretary Kennel Department. The Central Indiana Poultry Association's fifth annual benob show, Richmond, lnd., December 10 to 17. J. O. Myers, Secretary. 1891. The Buckeye Poultry and Pet Stock Association's bench Bhow. Ca- ton. O., December HO and . 1, and January 1, 2 and 3. James Sterling, Secretary. Michigan State Poultry and Pet Stock Association's twelfth annual bench show, Jackson, Mich., January 7,8, 9, 10, 11, 12,13 and li. 8. H. Slifer, Secretary. Central City Kennel Club's inaugural bench show, Jackson, Mich., January 10, 11, 12, 19, and 14. Dr. E. L. Kimball, Secretary. Sonth Carolina Poultry and Pet Stock Association's Internationa* Exhibition, Charleston S. 0., January IS, 14, 15. 16 and 17. Benj. Mo- inaes, Jr., Secretary. Louisiana Poultry and Pet Stock Association's first annual bene0 show. New Orleans, La., January 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25. A. E. Shaw Secretary. Elmira Poultry and Pet Stock Association's bench show, Elmira, N. Y., January 21. 22,23, 24, 25 and 26. Oarl Hart, Secretary. Sonth Carolina Kennel Association's inaugural bench show, Green- ville, 8. 0., January 27, 28, 29 and 30. F. F. Capers, Secretary, Westminster Kennel Club's fifteenth annual bench show. New York, February 24, 95, 26 and 27. James Mortimer, Superintendent. Maryland Kennel Club's second annual bench show, Baltimore Md., March 3, 4, 5, and 6. W. Stewart. Diffenderffer, Secretary. Duquesne Kennel Club's inaugural bench Bhow, Pittsburgh, Pa., Maioh 10,11,12 and 13. , Secretary. Massachusetts Kennel Clnb, Lynn, Mass , second annual bench Bhow, March 24, 25. 26 and 27. D. A. Williams, Secretary. New England Kennel Chub's seventh annual bench Bhow, BoBton, Mass., March bl, April I, 2 and 3. E. H. Inoore, Secretary. California Kennel Club's bench show, San Francisco, Cal., April , 1891. J. B. Martin, Secretary. Cleveland Kennel Olub's fourth annual bench show, Cleveland, O., April 1, 2, 3 and 4. 0. M. Munball. Secretary. Mascoutah KennelClub's third annual bench show, Chicago, 111., April 8, 9, 10 and 11. G. H. Goodrich, Manager. FIELD TRIALS. Philadelphia Kennel Club's seventh annual trials, December 15, Dea tone vi lie, Va. 1891. Southern Sportsmen's Association's annual field trial, Lafayette, La., January 13. John R. Renaud, Secretary. Pacific Kennel Club's eightb annual field trials, January 19, Bakers- field, Cal. H.H Brtggs,Secretary. Southern Field Trial Club's third annual field trials, New Albany, Mlaa., February 2. T. M. Brumby, Secretary. Visits. Mr. M. Kerr'a Fanny, foxterrier bitch, to J. B. Martin's (San Francisco, Cal.) Blemton Shiner (Champion Blemton Rubicon—Blemton Brilliant) on Nov. 24, 1890. Sales. J. B. Martin, San Francisco, Cal., has sold: Foxterrier dog puppy Foxey (Regent Vox—Blemton Saffron) oat of Jessie to P. E. Mendoza, Stockton, Cal. Thos. J. Ballantine, Peoria, Illinois, has sold La Veta (Champion Kash—Fair In*z), fawn with black muzzle pug bitch in whelp to Lord Clover (Champion LoriB—Nellie) to J. B. Martin, San Francisco, Cal. Whelps. Mr. C. A. Sumner's Foxterrier Bonnie Bess 13080 (Warren Jim ex Warren Forment) whelped one dog and two bitches to his Blemton Vesuvian 14290 (Champion Luoifer ex Blem- ton VeBta), at Los Angeles, November 25th. Champion Gladstone is Dead. The following letter will be read by all sporting men with regret. The owner of the grand old dog says: Friday, November 20th, as the sun was sinking in a cloud- less sky, old Gladstone walked into the front yard and lay down, as was his custom, basking in the evening sun; in an hour a man went to bring him in the house for the night and found him dead. So peacefully did his life ebb away, with- out a struggle, no one supposed him dead. His appetite was good to the last: there was no shriveling from old age, not a callous growth so usual in dogs of his age. His hearing failed about a year ago, and cataracts formed over eaah eye causing almost blindness, otherwise he looked the perfect dog he was even in death. The day he died the air was crisp, the leaves browned by recent frosts, the cover just killed inviting one to taste the held after Bob White. Many, many such days has the writer followed the noble old dog on just such a day, the happiest of his life, as he saw him leap held after field, and made point after point with the graces none but he possessed in comparing the style of others; his was left out, a clasB unto itself. His rapid circles when in quest of game were like the eagle swoop?, so rapid; bis eyes dilated with enthu- siasm when in tbe held, showing his intensity of purpose, his wonderful endurance, never yet equaled. It wbb a btting day to end the life of such a grand dog. Only a Bhort time ago the agent of one of the principal museums came to me and offered me quite a sum for Gladstone. When be told me his mission I remarked, I feared Gladstone had not many months to live, but be should die a natural death and in the handB of one he had served so long and faithfully. I was fortunate in getting a gentleman, who has beeD a taxidermist, to prepare bim for sending away to the best tax idermist I know of for mounting. I have preserved the last quail, Bnipe, woodcock and chicken he pointed and had them mounted. He will, when mouDted, be the central figure of the gruup. Ab, what pleasure they will recall. P. H. Bryson. Memphis, Nov. 21, 1890. The king of bird-dogs the world over was Champion Glad- stone. He had no equals. He was one of thoFe remarkable productions which nature, for some unaccountable reason, occasionally lends to all of her species. In the equine world there has been but one Maud S; in tbe elephantine world but one Jiimbo; in the intellectual arena but ooe Webster, so in thecaoine world, there has beeu but one Gladstone. The sportsman who has been deprived of tbe pleasure of seeing Gladstone in the field has beeu deprived of the grand- est sight whioh has ever been presented to the sporting world. To describe him would be almost [impossible. He stood alone, towering so far above all other dogs, as to ren- der comparisons impossible and utterly useless. He made his first public appearance at Hampton, Iowa in 1877. In the following November he appeared in the field trials, at Nashville, Tennessee. In speaking of his death the Amerioan Field closes a fine review of his life and character as follows: "Suoh a dog no one had seen; such a dog no one had believed possible; and the opinion was expressed and went forth that no one on the grounds had seen suoh a dog before, and they were all men of experience and owners of good dogs. We were vindicated; we had not said such a foolish thing as believed to be at the time; and Gladstone's fame was spread far and near, and as he grew* in years he grew in fame until by universal consent he was the uncrowned king of field dogs, and men of experience ceased to ra'e other dogs by him, so far ahead was he of everything else. The greatness a dog achieves brings for it the same bitter strife that greatness brings for a man, and Gladstone was an illustration of this. Never did a dog engender so much hatred. There are three positions in life, imbeoility, medi- ocrity, superiority. The first excites pity, the Becond exoites nothing, the third excites envy and its offspring hatred. Gladstone proved this. Gladstone's various races are so much a matter of history that it is not necessary to go into them. The following is his list of winnings: Bench shows: First in open class, special for the best English setter and special for the best setter of any strain, St. Louis, 1878; champion and special for the best setter of any strain, Boston, 1878; champion and special for tue best imported setter, any strain, and special for beBt setter, Baltimore, 1878. Field trials: First, Poppy Stake, Nashville. 1877, and third with Dog Whip, Brace Stakes, same meeting: second with Lincoln, Brace Stakes, Nashville, 1878; first, Eastern Field Trials, All-Age Stake, 18S0. Had we owned Gladstone, we could not have thought more highly of him than we did. In closing our remarks on his death, the question is, shall we ever see his duplicate? No man can predict with a certainty what will or what will not be; everything is possible, but this hardly probable. If how- ever, the world snonld ever see such a field dog again it must be from the loins of the grand old champion's descendants. Al Farrow.

 

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JG.Sire "Menlo Chief." 1 G. Dam (G. Sire "Monarch." (G. Dam We present herewith the portrait of the greyhound Al Farrow, winner of the great $500 stake, given by the Inter* State Coursing Association at their grand Meet at Merced, California, on the 18th, 19th and 20th of last month. This now famous dog won the first money and honors in a 4S dog entry, in which was presented the cream of the grey- bound family of the entire country. Of this phenomenal coursing dog but little is known tuat would indicate his right to the title of King of the Course, save the faot as demonstrated at the above M6et that he pos- sesses power and endurance in a degree hitherto unde- monstrated by the greyhound family. The pedigree of this dog, as far as we have been able to learn, is as follows: fSire "Black Bart"... AL FARROWJ j Dam "Black BesB"... He was whelped in Maroh, 1888, and was bred by Mr. Cooney, of San Jose. He is the winner of a large number of first class prizes in former courses run in this State. He is a deep orange brin- dle, with dark shadings, stands 26 inohes high, and weighs 65lbs.: his Ekull measures 15in.; nose, 5in.; cheBt 28Mn.; loin, 2Hin.; body, 25iu.; tip to tip, 61in. While in the above mentioned meet this dog did not have the peculiarly heavy work of some others, yet he won, and won easily, and it would not be at all surprising to any of the gentlemen who witnessed his marvelous work there to see bim make grand efforts to still remain at the head of the course in future contests. We learn that the noted fielder, Spring, the winner of the last of the Western Field Trials, died recently at West Point, Miss. He was owned by Mr. R. M. Hutchins, of Galveston, Texas. One of the most earnest fanciers ot the canine race in this city is Mr. J. B. Lewis of 409 Bryant St. He is the owner of some fine pointeis and in the past has possessed some re- markably fine dogB. The headquarters of tbe California Kennel Club is at his real esta'o office, 430 Montgomery St. This organization will hold its regular annual meeting for the election of officers for the eDsuing year on next Tuesday evening at the laBt above mentioned number. The attention of all kennel men is called to the advertise- ment of dog medioines by Mr. E. T. Allen, 416 Market St. this city, wbioh appears in this issue. He presents a remedy *or all the ills of the dog family. The field trials at Bakerstield which will open on the I9th of January, bid fair to exceed in interest all those of the past. The southern part of the State will be represented more fully than ever before. Advises from that section indicate a lively interest in this event. Not the least annoyance to the dog fanciers of the old world; is the contemptible dog thief, who is ever alert to seize and make off with good dogs of any class. The Stock-Keeper, of recent date, gives an account of a ras- cal who stole a young ladie3 pug while she was out walking with it, and is now doing hard labor, for three months in Maidstone, Gaol, for the theft. It is gratifying to notice the effect which the grand cours- ing meet at Merced haB had in greyhound circles throughout the State. It is evident that new faces will appear in the fu- ture coursing meets without the loss of any of the old ones. Several new dogs are in training, and it will be no matter of surprise to tbe initiated to see much of surpassing inter- est manifested iu the coursing meets of the future. The proposed Thanksgiving meet of the Occidental Cours- ing Club was postponed until New Sear's day. This aotion was taken by reason of the fact that this event, at the time originally proposed, followed the Merced meet too closely to allow many of the dogs that h»d taken part iu that event, to be placed in form for the Occidental meet. All will be well by the ooming of the new year, and some good sport may be expected at that time. The judges in the Eastern Field Trials were Messrs. Si- mon C. Bradley, Greenfield, Conn; Thomas Johnson, Win- nipeg, Manitoba, and W. W. Titus, Mount Pelis, Miss. Id champion stakes Gath's Mark won. For the Lorillard medalB: in dogs, O. W. Donner's Roi D'Or won; in bitches, F. R. Hitchcock's Annie F. The trials were quite largely attended and the interest was of the first nature from opening to finish. The famous St. Bernard, Prince Battenberg, K. C. S. B. 20,837, is dead. It was this dog that beat Plinlimmon at the Birmingham Show some three years ago. Of this splen- did animal The Btock Keeper at that time wrote: "Our personal opinion, as distinguished from what our re- porters may have said on different occasions, is not unknown to the St. Bernard world. In spite of the learned minds ar- rayed against us, we conscientiously upheld Mr. Betterton'a judgment at Birmingham when he yielded to type and char- acter in putting the lovely Prince Battenberg over the giaDt Plinlimmon. For canine beauty we know no dog so wor- shipful as Prince Battenberg." Mr. James Watson of Berkeley has now in transit from Liverpool a brace of setters than which no finer dogs can be found in the entire country. Mr. Wat3on has imported per- haps more good dogs than any other one man in the West. He now ha3 in his kennels one of the finest Foxterrier bitches in the West, Gip by name, and she is a beauty. He haB been singularly unlucky with a number of his dogs, espe- cially Black Joe, as fine a pointer as the State ever knew, that was accidentally drowned, and Brunette, the splendid little greyhound that died from over-exertion after a swift wild chase, in addition to a long gruelling course which she won at Merced. The many friends of Mr. Watson will sin- cerely wish that success may attend these new and splendid dogs which he is now bringing out. The second act in the comedy wherein Mr. 0. J. Peshall was indicted by the Grand Jury for criminal libel, sayB the Tarf, Field and Farm, on affidavits made by A. P. Vreden- burg, Secretary of the American Kennel Club, and Messrs. Anthony and Wilmerding, was enacted at tbe Court of Gen- eral Sessions, Part I, Thursday, Nov. 20th. Mr. Peshall wbb on hand ready to go on with the case, but the complainants pleaded for time. Mr. Peshall arose and severely denounced tbe methods adopted by the complainants, and demurred against delay. Judge Fitzgerald, from the beuch, presiding, in reply, stated that, Mr. Peshall being ready, he might ap- ply for a dismissal. Mr. Peshall's answer was that he did not wish the case dismissed, but wanted it tried on its mer- its. Tbe date for act three is set for the December term, and will be the first case on the calendar Monday, Dec, 1st. We had the pleasure last week of viewing Mr. Gavin Mc- Nab'B "Ingleside Crown Prince," a marveloiiBly developed pup of the mastiff family. This splendid animal was pur- chased recently by the above named gentlemen from Mr. Moore of Massachusetts. His pedigree iu part is as follows: G. G. Sire, Champ. f Sire.Illford Chan- cellor ' Caution.. a .*"" o . ** o . I G. Dam.Brenda Scun- dia Dam,Madge Mint--; lng |G. Sire.Obflinn. Mint- ing Lg. Dam.Beae, A. K. 2977 Crown Prince 105*4 . I Claudia. G.G. Sire, Turk. G. G. Dam, Brenda. G. G. Sire, Maximi- lian. G G. Dam, Cbani- brlan Princess. G. G.Siro, Major. G.G. Dam, Mollle, (Imported). It will be noticed that Ibis dog is only but little paBt his half year date; he is beautifully proportioned, and tips the scales at 135 pounds. Should he continue a uniform develop- ment, he will undnubtedly prove one of the most wonderful dogs in the entire country. All those interested in the mastiff family should no! see this handsome representation. Mr. Mooro prone ] him the finest specimen he haB ever sent out to the

  

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Title: Breeder and sportsman

Identifier: breedersportsman31883sanf

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Horses

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : [s. n. ]

Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant

  

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1883 Jpuc breeder and ^ortsnmw. 253 regarding the old time practices and the great divergences of the present day. The young men engaged in the profession are not so well posted, and though they have heard any amount of comparative talk, can scarcely realize that the stories are correct. The few old time trainers that are left have adopted the system iu vogue, though still clinging to a few of the customs that prevailed when they began practic- ing. It is not necessary to hark back to the days of Dutchman, Americus, or still further in the dim and shadowy recollec- tions of octogenarians for illustrations. The driver and trainer of O'Blennis, Gordon Abrarns, was recognized as one of the foremost trainers of his day, and as short a time ago as 1S59 we watched his operations. O'Blennis was running out preparatory to carrying him to New Orleans for a winter campaign, but he had a small black mare in training that was to accompany him. At or before the break of day the muzzle was taken off, and she got her first feedâhow much we never could learn, as the groom appeared to be loth to discover what his instructions were in respect to what she ate. At all events it was oats that had been "chopped," that is, put in a strong barrel aud beat with the edge of a garden spade until the hulls were loosened. These were taken on sheets and winnowed, so as to get rid of the loose hulls aud dust. To this was added oue-tbird or a quarter of hominy, that, too, having been shaken to get rid of the meal. Her first feed eaten, aud then the groom walked her in hand for a couple of hours, after which she was driven, jogged ever so long, and then sent at her best pace for several miles, walked again in the "cooling out" process, with occasional swallows of water. The hay was timothy, "pulled," stripped between the hands until the blades were removed and all the top eould be spanned with the hands. Before her third feed, which was given at noon, she had an hour's walk; then at 3 p. m. another feed, followed b}T a long walk, after which she â was "done up" and fed again. The last thing at night was to give her another feed, after which the bed was adjusted, the muzzle put on, and about the only undisturbed period of the twenty-four hours was from then until the early morning meal. "Drawing" preparatory to a race was an intricate piece of business in those days and only the high professors of the art could manage it properly. So many "go down" (swallows) of water, such a reduction of hay, nntil the proportion was almost infinitessimal. Then every training stable was adorned with bottles enough to set up a country apothecary's shop, with balling-irons, drenching-horns, fleams and blood- sticks, twitches and hobbles. There was no end to the balls. Sweating balls, fever balls, condition balls, balls for the water, to give lustre to the coat, to fine the legs, to clear the wind. Before he was put in training, after having been laid up for the winter, a course of physic was the proper thing, this con- sisting of violent purgatives administered at three different times, with an interval of so many days between them. We have always thought that James L. Eoff had more to do with inaugurating a more sensible system of training trotters than any man of that time. It is certain that he was the first to reduce the work and to abridge the long tiresome walks. He also had a better idea of how a trotter or pacer should be driven so far, at least, as to give up the terrible pull at the bit which was then the custom. As the English say, he had hands as well as head, and though an ungraceful rider, his "heels" were all right as he had not a superior in the pigskin when trotters or pacers were to be piloted. Unquestionably one great advantage came from commencing as an amateur, and therefore not so firmly bound by the traditions of the stable. He, in a measure, was guided by lessons acquired from his individual observations, and did not depend on cus- toms inaugurated centuries ago. He did his own thinking. As we write a conversation with Simon Anderson comes freshly to memory, though it is fully twenty-five years since the relation. The occurences spoken of was over forty years ago, when Eoff was engaged in the manufacture of cider. The sparkling nectar was in high repute all over the North- east, and it was all he could do to supply the demand. Busy as a young, energetic man could be, working with a will and with no time to branch into other pursuits. He owned a pacing mare, called Cider Maid, that Anderson was driving, and had lost two heats. Eoff took Anderson's place in the sulky, won the race, and on subsequent trials he could always ride or drive her faster than his trainer. According to An- derson's account this was the first of his handling fast horses, and never having thought of it when Eoff was present it is without verification on hisupart, though there is no reason to doubt the accuracy of the statement. Not very long after the settlement of Wisconsin Mr. Craig, of Philadelphia, sent a number of thoroughbreds to that State, and the trainer was Simon Anderson's father. The location was only a short distance from Madison, and though the stock was of great benefit to the State they were not very successful on the track. At that time Galena was the "racing center" of that portion of the country, and the horses from Kentucky, Tennessee and Alabama were shipped there by the Mississippi river. A great deal of money was betted by the lead miners, and in the neighborhood of Galena were three race courses. When the gold fever broke out the lead mines were nearly depopulated, and a large number of the descend- ants of the winners were brought to California. A great pro- portion of emigrant mares from that section and Western Missouri were more highly bred, and have been one of the causes of the superiority of California stock. When a California pedigree is lost on the side of the dam it is a just inference that the animal either traces to an emi- grant mare or to the natives. Iu either case there is likely to be merit. Iu gathering the team which was to make the tedious journey across the plains, the very best within the circumstances of the Argjnauts were secure.!. Mares were chosen in preference to horses, as it was well known that they were better adapted to travel through the alkaline dnst. It was also known tnat mares could endure a scarcity of water better than horses, and whenever the choice lay be- tween two animals of the opposite sex the female was selected. Though the name of mustang was held to be a sinister appel- lation, for many good qualities the native California horse has never had a superior. That California is favorable to a growth which is conducive of speed is proved by the native cattle, which could run like racehorses, and which were as shapely as a gazelle. It is true that their progenitors, imported from Spain, were active specimens of the bovine race, though there is little question that the descendants had a greater gift of speed, and better fortified with endurance. The California hare is also said to be faster than those of Great Britain, and they are certainly a good deal larger. The 2:10 which Johuson the pacer scored to his credit in Chicago has "rehabilitated" the sidewheelers in the post of honor which was held so long by Pocahontas. Until the sec- onds were knocked off by the trotters from the record of the wonderful daughter of Cadmus, time and time again, there was still an enduring belief that the pacing gait, in point of speed, was next to the flying gallop. Then the pacers went completely out of fashion, and the best of them could only pick up a few scattering crumbs from the tables of the trot- ters. The ban amounted to complete ostracism, and every one who was unfortunate enough to own a pacer was busily at work with shackles and toe-weights to "convert" them to a more righteous method of progression. Billy Boise, Ma- goozler, Dan Yoorhees, Sweetzer, etc., made an expiring effort to keep up the sport, but without avail, and there was an interregnum when there was no one to wear the crown of lateral motion. Again, there has been a change. Little Brown Jug raised a furore when he put 2:11| on the black- board to fail ignobly when he essayed to lower it. St. Ju- lien and Maud S. toppled him down, for with his feet ruined by shoes he could not even move a side at a time. This year, however, has been a great one for the pacers, and ad- miring thousands have witnessed the struggles between Rich- ball Westmont, Buffalo Girl and others, and then came John- son to raise the har with the fastest mark of all. The old pacer Longfellow was enjoying a let-up at the Oakland track some years ago. In the daytime he ran in a small lot adjoining the course. The enclosure was about 150 yards of the inside track, reaching from the judges' stand along the homestretch. There was a pacing race and a trot the same afternoon. When the pacers were scoring Longfel- low would "shack" back with them, wheel when they did, and lead the field as far as the confining fence would permit. When the trotters started he was contented to watch them, without any desire to take part in the fight. These glorious October days pass like a light cloud before a brisk breeze. Not a minute, from the time the sun peers above the Contra Costa range until it sinks deep behind the Pacific, of disagreeability. It is irksome to stay within doors, and we are prone to economize a few hours of the more sombre night in order that the sunshine can be en- joyed. Then, for this week there has been such a brilliant moon, and the air so mellifluous that there was another temptation, and the desire to stroll about, with the shadows so distinct and the illuminated gaps so bright, that the shut- ters had to be closed in order to overcome the blandishments of Luna. It is a glorious world that lies between the crests of the Sierras and the Pacific, and notwithstanding so much of the primeval curse is still in force as compels, at times, the sweat to fall from the brow in huge globules, there is so much to give heartfelt thanks for that tired brain and mus- cles must join in the thanksgiving hymn. "Keep to the Left.' The ownership of one hundred millions of dollars does not justify a disregard of the rules of the track, as Mr. Yanderbilt has, doubtless, learned by this time. Fortu- nately he was not much hurt, as the risk of serious injury was great, and had it been another driver than Robert Bonner, whom he met, it is very likely that there would have been a more disastrous termination. A man of less nerve than Mr. Bonner, would have endeavored to pull outside, after he saw that a collision was imminent, in which case it is long odds that the force of contact would have been terribly augmented. Then Mr. Bonner would not get out of his way, and so compelled the railway king to surrender a part of the space he had usurped, and thus taught him a lesson that will have lasting effects. There is scarcely a season that one or more horses are noc killed by a transgression of the rule of keeping to the left, and this example being so notable in all probability will have a better effect in teaching obedience than all the casualities that have preceded it. Mr. Bonner would not have surrendered his right for all the magnates in the land, and every driver is under obligations to him for the lesson he gave. THE KENNEL. Mr. Post's Back Down. Editor Breeder and Sportsman: Mr. Post I notice in your last declines to make a match against my dog on any fair terms, and tries to cover up his backdown by insinuating that I and my dog are not fit associates for his blue blood setter and his aristocratic self. The fact is just as I always surmised: Mr. Post is afraid to match Dido for aDy amount of money, ou any sportsmanlike terms. When he challenged Bob and Kate so freely I suspected a bluff, but had no idea that he would iguomiuiously back down from a cur dog. As to myself I can only repeat a previous offer to bet Mr. Post any part of SHOO that I am his physical superior at any manly sport he can name, but as he has positively said he "will not accept the offer I do not care to parade it and will let the mat- ter drop only demanding that before Mr. Post makes another blow about his great bitch he will accept my challenge which is still open. Videx. A Pup's Strategy. The question, "Can .inimals reason?" has often been as- serted iu the affirmative, as often denied, and is yet unset- tled. There seems to be little doubt, however, that the most intelligent animals do possess some reasoning powers, and not a few remarkable incidents have beeu related of the sa- gacity of some of the domestic animals. A well-known gen- tleman of this city gives the following account of the din- ning strategj' of a puppy to obtain a good dinner at the expense of a party of cats. The cats consist of a mother with a family of four sturdy kits, all possessing to an unus- ual degree of fierceness an intense antipathy for the canine race. The cats are regularly given a substantial meal of meat and other appetizing viands, to which, it is needless to say, puppy is not an invited guest. Any ap- proaches on his part were warned off with savage growls and a liberal display of clawsâso for a* time the poor dog looked on and enjoyed a sort of Barmicidal feast. But, when the other day the cats had a finer dinner than custom- ary, puppy carefully considered the matter and determined to make a bold move and secure his share of the coveted victuals. Accordingly he approached to a safe distance and then executed, with great rapidity, a flank movement upon the enemy, and backing suddenly in among the surprised cats, seized a portion of the meat and, as only his rear end was presented to the foe, made off with the spoils without serious damage. Twice pup repeated the operation, and, al- though the somewhat demoralized cats made a vigorous at- tack upon him, his strategy saved him. Thus he secured a good meal by his ingenuity, and the cats no longer object to his company during meal hours.âLos Angeles Herald. "We are sorry to see that some of our correspondents have the asperities more than the amenities of literature at their command. We think it, however, due to one of our correspondents, X, to say that in all his letters he has been governed by a sense of moderation and insinuations to the to the contrary are not fair. It is a great thing in England to own a stallion like Hermit, His list of 1SS4 is full alreadyâthat is, he has been secured for the service of fifteen mares, exclusive of his owner's, at 200 guineas each. DwyerBros. have won upwards of ©100,000 so far this sea- son. In their eight years' connection with the turf they have won more than $400,000. And this, too, in face of the fact that in 1S77 their winnings were less than $3,000. DIETZ' AXLE OIL. PATENT COMPOUND OIL.

 

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Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

If you plan on keeping a kennel of 75 plus dogs, and also plan on entering the big races here in Alaska - you'd better like the cold. Just booting up your team for a training run, can numb up your fingers until you can hardly maneuver the Velcro needed to keep those booties on their little canine feet.

If you plan on taking out just 14 dogs, that means you will boot up 56 times. Brrrr . . .

*( The 20/21 Iditarod is scheduled to start on March 6, 2021 in Anchorage. As I write, Anchorage has plenty of snow - but who knows what kind of weather will hit between now and then. Keep tuned . . .)

On Saturday the Cape Fear Kennel Club showed what their dogs can do at the North Carolina Coastal Land Trust's event at the Five Eagles Farm in Pender County. This farm is adjacent to the Northeast branch of the Cape Fear River. The dogs have been (well) trained to retrieve items. In this case its the orange decoy.

 

Mr. Thomas has helped shape the property by digging a number of ponds to help facilitate the training. However, as part of his conservation easement on the property, they are also performing longleaf pine restoration, prescribed burns, and many other practices to enhance food for wildlife. This is truly multiuser conservation.

This is all the posing he'd agree to. Baby steps.

 

Failed Foster, we've had him almost a year now.

 

He was in the shelter for 45 days.

He did not do well in the kennel environment.

They had him on the euth list due to attitude problems.

We agreed to "foster" him for a rescue group that pulled him the day he was supposed to be put down.

After we'd had him a short while we realized he had bad hip dysplasia and a serious attitude problem and felt we'd never be able to find him a home with someone who'd have enough of a sense of humor to care for him properly, plus he was growling at us less, so we decided to keep him.

After obedience training, pain pills and a trip to the beach he's made huge progress. He no longer growls or "guards resources" and is becoming very affectionate. He plays with our other dogs, watches out for Mikey and is anxious to learn & please.

 

But he's still definitely not like everybody else.

youtu.be/BFkYoT5Gezo

The Border Collie is a working and herding dog breed developed in the Anglo-Scottish border region of the United Kingdom for herding livestock, especially sheep. It was specifically bred for intelligence and obedience. Considered highly intelligent, extremely energetic, acrobatic and athletic, they frequently compete with great success in sheepdog trials and dog sports. They are often cited as the most intelligent of all domestic dogs. Border Collies continue to be employed in their traditional work of herding livestock throughout the world.

 

The Border Collie is descended from landrace collies, a type found widely in the British Isles. The name for the breed came from its probable place of origin along the Anglo-Scottish border. Mention of the "Collie" or "Colley" type first appeared toward the end of the 19th century, although the word "collie" is older than this and has its origin in the Scots language. It is also thought that the word 'collie' comes from the old Celtic word for useful. Many of the best Border Collies today can be traced back to a dog known as Old Hemp.

 

In 1915, James Reid, Secretary of the International Sheep Dog Society (ISDS) in the United Kingdom first used the term "Border Collie" to distinguish those dogs registered by the ISDS from the Kennel Club's Collie (or Scotch Collie, including the Rough Collie and Smooth Collie) which originally came from the same working stock but had developed a different, standardised appearance following introduction to the show ring in 1860 and mixture with different types breeds.

 

Old Hemp, a tricolour dog, was born in Northumberland in September 1893 and died in May 1901. He was bred by Adam Telfer from Roy, a black and tan dog, and Meg, a black-coated, strong-eyed dog. Hemp was a quiet, powerful dog to which sheep responded easily. Many shepherds used him for stud and Hemp's working style became the Border Collie style. All pure Border Collies alive today can trace an ancestral line back to Old Hemp.

  

I had mentioned that I am in a training class at the shelter, and well, Stevie is a star pupil. So far she knows sit, lay down, and she crawls for treats (I love this!), and we're working on loose leash walking, and sit-stay, and lay down-stay. So far she will stay when people walk by and when small dogs go by. She still gets up when a large dog crosses her path and we're working on this, aren't we, girl? Guess who has fallen in love with Stevie?

 

She still has more things to learn in the next two sessions so she can receive her certificate/diploma that will go on her kennel door, hopefully helping her to get adopted...

 

Getting there, ODC

.:Short Leash:. Cozy Kennel

@ Boardwalk Event

 

• original mesh

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• 7 solo bento enabled animations

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• 7 door sign options (home sweet home, beware, beloved pet, do not feed, bad puppy jail, home for wayward pups, and paw heart)

• working door with lock and access options

• mod/copy/NO transfer

 

*** 25% off for Short Leash group members- WEAR YOUR TAG! ♥ ***

 

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For 12 Months for Dogs -- 7/12

 

For 366: The 2016 Edition -- 213/366

 

When I saw the theme for this month, I was excited for a variety of reasons. One is that I love fairy tales and setting up photos that represent them. Another was that this month marks the third anniversary of Flattery joining our family.

 

Flattery's life is a bit of a fairy tale. Before she came to us, she was training for a life on the race track. When she got to the track, she got very sick, and nobody I've talked to seemed to know what it was. What we do know is that she lost a lot of weight and all of her fur. In a last ditch effort to save her life, her trainer sent her to the adoption kennel. The adoption kennel had her for over six months before they even considered placing her in a home because they didn't know if she'd survive. We went up to visit the kennel to write a blog post story, but had to meet a few of the dogs. We'd recently lost one of ours and were still a bit heartbroken. I wanted to adopt another Greyhound that everyone would fall in love with and would make everyone want a Greyhound of their own. At first, all I saw was her kinked tail, goofy ears and the scar on her behind. But when I looked at her through the camera lens, I saw those stunning eyes and she was incredibly sweet. Two days later, we went back to bring her home and she remembered us.

 

We have had some trials with her, but I have always been glad we brought her home. She is funny, sweet and endearing all at the same time, even while she's stealing your food or causing some other mischief. She has made our home so much happier and she has really earned her fairy tale ending, even though it was really the start of a new chapter.

 

You can read more about Flattery at TalesAndTails.com.

  

Beluga. I love every single thing about this dog. He came to me 4 years ago from a distance kennel. His person was training at the time for the Yukon Quest and the Iditarod. She described Beluga as the best dog she'd ever had and he had recently come off a 300 mile race where he led her team the entire way. "So why would she give him up," You ask?

 

The reason she gave him up was, "he wasn't happy." It seems he was becoming stressed on runs of over 50 miles (80km), and distance racers need to run 50 or more miles at a time. So as her mileage increased she had to leave Beluga behind in the dogyard; to a sled dog this is like a form of punishment; so either way he was unhappy.

 

I don't run those distances, rarely run 30 miles at a crack, so I decided to take him; in fact I was honored to have him offered to me. At first I wasn't entirely impressed with him, she had talked him up so much, about his disposition and smarts, but he wasn't a great leader for me, and he was a bit standoffish. He was okay, he held the team out and he knew the commands, but often he was stubborn, and didn't seem to want to take commands from me. But eventually that changed, I learned that he was testing me, he didn't trust me. Building that trust would take time. It took almost a year and now four years later I know how great he is, so smart, so well mannered, so loyal to me and he's both strong and sensitive. We're partners now and I think he loves me; I know I love him. He's eleven years old now, I don't really want to think about him not being in my team, hopefully he has at least one more season in him.

 

Oh, and we celebrate two birthdays today, Beluga and Pepsi. Pepsi came from the same place as Beluga. I'll try to post Pepsi a bit later. Thanks for looking and reading.

 

today, the dogs and I went to a local kennel club for agility run-throughs, then we went on a little walk at a nearby park. since we are deep into hunting season now, and my girls' prey drive sometimes overcomes their obedience training... we were restricted to leash walking today. boring!!! but at least we all got some exercise, and as a bonus... we ran into this adorable little herd of goats! alice mostly just watched them. june, of course, wanted to herd them. but, we quietly observed each other for about ten minutes, and then we moved along down the trail.

These folks are from a Mount Forest area boarding kennel and training facility. They are regulars at our Festival and Fall Fair. They supply great photo ops.

Echo joined our family today. Keiko and June are shadowing her every move and don't seem to be intimidated by her but Rusty is really unsure and feel he needs to hiss and growl.

 

Potty training is going to be a full time job. She's already had multiple accidents because I wasn't watching her even though she was near me. It's amazing how often puppies have to go.

 

I have got to keep my eyes on her so cannot be on the computer [unless she's kenneled]. My time on Flickr is going to be very limited for awhile. I can see that she's going to be a handful. She's a vocal dog....will whine when she's put in the crate in protest...but will finally give up and go to sleep after a few minutes of shrilled pitched whining.

 

It's the first day away from her mother, littermates and all that is familiar to her.

 

What have we done? It's going to be a very very long six months or year making sure Echo is trained correctly and I'm determined to put the time and energy into it. Even if it means I won't be here much in the meantime. Wish me luck....I'm going to need it.....raising a puppy --esp a cattledog pup will be a major undertaking to do it right.

 

When we look at Sophia today, it's amazing to think that not long ago she was a scared baby, living in the shelter. Today she is happy, well balanced and starting her new life with a wonderful forever family.

 

But a few months ago, Sophia's future looked quite bleak until one day someone stepped forward and fought for Sophia to have a second chance.

 

I received a call one morning from a dear friend that is a pit-bull lover/owner, with a desperate plea for help.

 

Through a friend on Facebook, she knew of a family who recently moved to a Los Angeles housing complex that didn't allow Pit Bulls. The family had a three year old, female blue American Pit-bull named Sophia that had been with the family since she was a puppy. She was a lovely family dog raised with young children.

 

The owners made an attempt to find Sophia a home via FB posts and word of mouth, and for a few weeks, while they searched, Sophia lived in the family’s car and was only let out for occasional bathroom breaks. Ultimately, they decided their only option was made to take Sophia to the shelter.

 

No one, not even their children, knew the truth of Sophia’s fate…

 

Late one night my friend was on the LA City shelter site looking for a dog they had recently seen at a shelter adoption event. She couldn't find it and just happened to click on the “randomizer” button of available dogs. The first dog that popped up was Sophia… And she had been in the shelter for more than 66 days.

 

She asked me to reach out and see what we could do. I called the shelter discovered they had Sophia labeled as "aggressive" and "unapproachable" to the point they couldn't even vaccinate her. This day was supposed to be her last day and they were just waiting for a certain person to arrive to help handle her while they euthanized her. All of this from a dog who had spent the first 3 years as a family pet with little kids.

 

I made a mad dash to the shelter and was prepared for anything. When I got there Sophia was standing at the front of her kennel and very interested to meet me. She was slightly shy, but responsive to my attention. Without a doubt though, she was scared out of her mind in the kennel and confused why she was there.

 

I pulled her out of the kennel, got her in the play area and she was instantly giving kisses, doing tricks and showing her belly. We spent more than an hour together to be sure she wasn’t aggressive with me, other people or dogs and she passed every test. Quite simply, she was lovely.

 

So, of course I pulled her from the shelter. She happily sat in the back seat of my car all the way to the vet and continually popped up front to give me a kiss or two… or three.

 

I sent Sophia to training to insure she didn't have any issues we missed and a few days into it, the trainer called and said "I don't understand while Sophia is here. She is wonderful!"

 

Two weeks later, Sophia was adopted. Her parents decided to continue training and they have taken it so far that they're even looking into training Sophia to be a therapy dog!! All this from a Pit Bull the shelter had labeled as aggressive and unapproachable.

 

Let this be another reminder to us that you cannot judge a dog based solely on its breed, and- it's not fair to judge a dog when they are in a shelter, scared out of their minds.

 

If you were suddenly stuck in a cage in a strange and stressful place, you too would behave differently.

 

For more rescue stories like Sophia's, please follow Bill Foundation on Facebook www.facebook.com/billfoundationdogrescue

 

Xo

 

Annie

 

www.billfoundation.org

 

Click HERE to see Sophia with her forever family: www.flickr.com/photos/billfoundation/9627823702/

  

Fenway is a 2 year old Boykin Spaniel a breed of water retriever from South Carolina. He calls Northern California home. Photo taken at Solano County, California. They are a driven and smart breed and great duck-dogs!. Fenway is from the Pocataligo's Kennel in South Carolina..

Taken at the Chena, Alaska kennel, an hour outside of Fairbanks.

(175/358)

 

I awoke with a goal to get her acquainted with her kennel. Mildly successful.

I'm trying to get Suria and I certified so we can be a dog team in the Chicago public schools-based program SitStayRead. Children with weak reading skills read to a dog. The program has been shown to improve these children's' reading skills by almost 50%. A wonderful program in my estimate, and a good outlet for a bored dog.

 

However, so far it doesn't bode well for a certain dog. I went to a dog owners' info session yesterday to find out the requirements for the dog to pass the test. Suria will assuredly fail on most of the requirements. She has to come when called. Fail! Lie down when commanded to. Fail! Stay on the spot when I move away from her. Fail! Act calmly when the children come to read to her. On the street when a child comes up and asks to meet her, her usual reaction is to get so excited she spins around in circles, Fail! Not react when the trainer comes in the room, comes and talks to me, and ignores her. Fail! Not require undue attention from me, but concentrate on interacting with each child. In other words not require constant cuddling and attention from me. Fail! Not straining at the leash when there are distractions. The dogs have to pass through school corridors on the way to the classroom, and not try to greet the passing children since some come from cultures where people are afraid of dogs. Suria is always straining on the leash and lunging at any dogs or squirrels she sees. Fail! The only positive note being she can retake the test however many times I wish. So, it'll be like the driver who keeps retaking their driving test a gazillion times before giving up in despair. If she lives that long. Oh, the only other positive note, we agreed she'll only participate in the first grade program where there's only one dog, so she doesn't have the opportunity to try and kill the other dogs.

 

Speaking of not coming, she had a banner day yesterday, so to speak. She was playing ball in prison (tennis court) when she decided she was overheating so burst out of prison, ignoring my yelling, and shot down into the lake to cool down. I chucked balls in the lake for awhile, but then she saw a duck and decided it would be more fun to retrieve the duck. She started following it, and the duck just kept leading her farther and farther away. More yelling. They headed up the coastline until they were out of sight. I raced out to the end of the pier only to see a little white dot, her face, almost at the Evanston border. She finally gave up but didn't come back to the park we were in, just turned in at the park north of it. So, I had to race up the sidewalk into the other park. There she sat on the shore, waves lapping around her, chewing on her ball. A woman sitting on the shore was relieved to find out I was her human. Suria had appeared out of nowhere and tried to con her into throwing her ball for her. When I returned to the park the fellow dog owners there had some helpful suggestions including buying myself a wet suit. Sigh!

 

I'm quite sure it's all my fail in fact. Failed to train her! In my defense we got our previous dog, Saskia, from the same kennel. No training was needed. She was submissive to other dogs, obedient, could walk off leash without distraction, etc., etc.

Echo was weighed [ 13. 13 pounds], had her temp taken [here] , nails trimmed and ears swabbed. Also got nasal vaccine for kennel cough since she's going to be around a lot of dogs the first year of her life via training, etc.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Brian Moreno, kennel master attached to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, receives a ferocious bite on the arm from Military Working Dog Chris during training in subject control techniques at Joint Security Station Loyalty, eastern Baghdad, Iraq.

 

Joint Combat Camera Center Iraq

Photo by Staff Sgt. James Selesnick

 

www.dvidshub.net/?script=images/images_gallery.php&ac...

KEATS is a handsome Pit Bull who’s a little under one year old. He’s a gentle, friendly young dog who has a rather shy, sensitive side that will respond well to kind handling and positive training. He’s a little unsure of other dogs, but tries his best to make friends.

Keats is looking for a loving, patient family willing with help him build his confidence.

 

Keats lives in Kennel 29.

For more information about Keats contact doginfo@apsofdurham.org.

Lots more shots of the parallel bar competition and other shots of jumping through the hoops.

 

The Lost Coast Kennel Club (LCKC) provides the people of coastal northern California with opportunities to meaningfully interact with their dogs by providing forums for ring practice, earth dog, tracking, Canine Good Citizen test, conformation, obedience, agility and other dog-related events. Protect and advance all pure-bred dogs, encourage sportsmanlike competition at AKC sanctioned events, and to provide education and exhibitions concerning dog ownership, care, training, and recreation.

 

If you are a member of the Kennel Club and would like a copy of one of your dogs photos please Flickr mail me and I will be happy to send a copy to you.

With joy in our hearts and tears in our eyes, we send Yellow Girl back to The Seeing Eye. During her first month back, she will adjust to living in the kennel. She will meet new friends, both human and quadruped. She will have medical exams. She will be observed and evaluated. Once she is given clearance, she will be assigned to an instructor and begin formal harness training. At this time we will receive a postcard informing us of this good news.

 

We often hear, “I could never give her back.” I can assure you, this is not an easy time for us, however we knew she was never our dog. We spend the last year loving, training and grooming her for this day. It is always bittersweet. She will remain in our hearts forever.

 

We hope you enjoyed following along. Your views, favorites and comments mean much to B and I. We thank you. I promise you will hear any news as soon as we receive it. And, in about 5 months, when we attend her “town walk” (graduation) I will be certain to post photos.

 

Endings lead to new beginnings ~

 

Submitted to ODC/ topic ~ POV

Depends on how you approach puppy raising, from my POV it’s great fun and very rewarding.

This is RUPERT, a gentle, affectionate Plott Hound/Carolina Dog mix who’s a little under one year old. He’s a very endearing, people-focused young dog who has a rather sensitive, submissive side, so he’ll do well with kind handling and training to build his confidence. He’s quite playful once he warms up – he loves to pounce on a ball, and loves his toys!

Rupert will be a sweet family pet.

 

Rupert lives in kennel 40.

For more information about Rupert, contact doginfo@apsofdurham.org.

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