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I was join a birdwatching tour in 04/06 ~ 04/24.

The location is Costa Rica, We visited almost all the famous bird-watching spots.

All we have recorded were nearly 300 bird species, nearly 150 add for myself.

Local pleasant climate, the locals are very friendly with well give message and birds.

Is a perfect birdwatching trips, ecological well maintained, so for the birds is very happiness and safety.

Of course, I need time for organizing photos, thank you all encouragement and keep support with ABERLIN.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long-tailed_silky-flycatcher

 

terms.naer.edu.tw/detail/1684689/

We saw lots of these pretty skippers in the last month of the season at the river wildflowers. Then they abruptly stopped - I think some return to Florida. This one had extra-long tails.

 

It's RAINING here at last!

Long-tailed Tit - Aegithalos Caudatus

 

The long-tailed tit is globally widespread throughout temperate northern Europe and Asia, into boreal Scandinavia and south into the Mediterranean zone. It inhabits deciduous and mixed woodland with a well-developed shrub layer, favouring edge habitats. It can also be found in scrub, heathland with scattered trees, bushes and hedges, in farmland and riverine woodland, parks and gardens. The bird's year-round diet of insects and social foraging bias habitat choice in winter towards deciduous woodland, typically of oak, ash and locally sycamore species. For nesting, strong preference is shown towards scrub areas. The nest is often built in thorny bushes less than 3 metres above the ground.

 

The nest of the long-tailed tit is constructed from four materials - lichen, feathers, spider egg cocoons and moss, with over 6,000 pieces used for a typical nest. The nest is a flexible sac with a small, round entrance on top, suspended either low in a gorse or bramble bush or high up in the forks of tree branches. The structural stability of the nest is provided by a mesh of moss and spider silk. The tiny leaves of the moss act as hooks and the spider silk of egg cocoons provides the loops; thus forming a natural form of velcro. The tit lines the outside with hundreds of flakes of pale lichens - this provides camouflage. Inside, it lines the nest with more than 2,000 downy feathers to insulate the nest. Nests suffer a high rate of predation with only 17% success.

 

Outside the breeding season they form compact flocks of 6 to 17 birds, composed of family parties (parents and offspring) from the previous breeding season, together with any extra adults that helped to raise a brood. These flocks will occupy and defend territories against neighbouring flocks. The driving force behind the flocking behaviour is thought to be that of winter roosting, being susceptible to cold; huddling increases survival through cold nights.

 

From July to February, the non-breeding season, long-tailed tits form flocks of relatives and non-relatives, roosting communally. When the breeding season begins, the flocks break up, and the birds attempt to breed in monogamous pairs. Males remain within the winter territory, while females have a tendency to wander to neighbouring territories.

 

Pairs whose nests fail have three choices: try again, abandon nesting for the season or help at a neighbouring nest. It has been shown that failed pairs split and help at the nests of male relatives, recognition being established vocally. The helped nests have greater success due to higher provisioning rates and better nest defence. At the end of the breeding season, in June–July, the birds reform the winter flocks in their winter territory.

 

Population:

 

UK breeding:

 

340,000 territories

Long-tailed Tit, Frogwell Lane Chippenham Wiltshire UK

Long Tailed Duck - Clangula Hyemalis

 

Seen here feeding on Lampreys

 

Diving duck that favors

Saltwater in winter and Arctic tundra pools in summer. Males are distinctive with black, white, gray, and brown patterns and long pointed tail. Male plumage changes dramatically from winter to summer. Females and immature males are brownish overall with whiter face and large dark cheek patch. Dives frequently to feed mainly on invertebrates.

In my opinion one of the most beautiful flycatchers here, you can find them in the mountains of Costa Rica. Early morning (around 05.30 am) he was busy to get his breakfast in collecting berries. By the way I think every birder knows you need to be early for exiting images. Have a great day and stay safe.

Please click for the larger image to see all details! Thank you for all the views, comments and fav. It is very much appreciated, though the written comments are the most interesting! Use of this image on websites, blogs or other media without explicit permission is not permitted. © Jan H. Boer 2020

The backlight gave a wonderful bokeh in this shot, one of the reasons I like it very much. I like challenges to get the most out of me and backlight shots are always a bit special to get good results. Have a nice day and stay safe my friends and thx for all the comments at my yesterdays image.

Please click for the larger image to see all details! Thank you for all the views, comments and fav. It is very much appreciated, though the written comments are the most interesting! Use of this image on websites, blogs or other media without explicit permission is not permitted. © Jan H. Boer 2020

DELIGHTFUL and often confiding little bird with a proportionately very long tail and seemingly an almost spherical body. The long-tailed Tit is often seen in rather animated flocks; it moves in a rather jerky fashion and has acrobatic feeding habits, which is so entertaining to watch, one of my favorite birds, captured through the kitchen window on a very wet day, hence the 1/30 shutter speed on a I.S.O of 1250.

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THANK YOU FOR BEING A FRIEND, please leave a comment, and I will look forward to returning the visit.

Stay safe and well, God loves you, keep a smile on your face and love in your heart for everyone..............................Tomx

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"GODs BEAUTY is SIMPLY AMAZING !"

Long-tailed Tit - Aegithalos Caudatus

 

The long-tailed tit is globally widespread throughout temperate northern Europe and Asia, into boreal Scandinavia and south into the Mediterranean zone. It inhabits deciduous and mixed woodland with a well-developed shrub layer, favouring edge habitats. It can also be found in scrub, heathland with scattered trees, bushes and hedges, in farmland and riverine woodland, parks and gardens. The bird's year-round diet of insects and social foraging bias habitat choice in winter towards deciduous woodland, typically of oak, ash and locally sycamore species. For nesting, strong preference is shown towards scrub areas. The nest is often built in thorny bushes less than 3 metres above the ground.

 

The nest of the long-tailed tit is constructed from four materials - lichen, feathers, spider egg cocoons and moss, with over 6,000 pieces used for a typical nest. The nest is a flexible sac with a small, round entrance on top, suspended either low in a gorse or bramble bush or high up in the forks of tree branches. The structural stability of the nest is provided by a mesh of moss and spider silk. The tiny leaves of the moss act as hooks and the spider silk of egg cocoons provides the loops; thus forming a natural form of velcro. The tit lines the outside with hundreds of flakes of pale lichens - this provides camouflage. Inside, it lines the nest with more than 2,000 downy feathers to insulate the nest. Nests suffer a high rate of predation with only 17% success.

 

Outside the breeding season they form compact flocks of 6 to 17 birds, composed of family parties (parents and offspring) from the previous breeding season, together with any extra adults that helped to raise a brood. These flocks will occupy and defend territories against neighbouring flocks. The driving force behind the flocking behaviour is thought to be that of winter roosting, being susceptible to cold; huddling increases survival through cold nights.

 

From July to February, the non-breeding season, long-tailed tits form flocks of relatives and non-relatives, roosting communally. When the breeding season begins, the flocks break up, and the birds attempt to breed in monogamous pairs. Males remain within the winter territory, while females have a tendency to wander to neighbouring territories.

 

Pairs whose nests fail have three choices: try again, abandon nesting for the season or help at a neighbouring nest. It has been shown that failed pairs split and help at the nests of male relatives, recognition being established vocally. The helped nests have greater success due to higher provisioning rates and better nest defence. At the end of the breeding season, in June–July, the birds reform the winter flocks in their winter territory.

 

Population:

 

UK breeding:

 

340,000 territories

(Aegithalos caudatus) I am currently having trouble with my Flickr email notifications and have missed a lot of your comments and invites. Please bear with me while I try and resolve this with Flickr and in the meantime if I miss any of your lovely invites or comments then please accept my apologies. I will try and get back up to speed as soon as I can.

 

*** Well this is my first photograph of a Long tailed Tit , I must say given the circumstances I am fairly pleased with it . It was sitting in the Cherry tree about half way down the garden it was taken from our bedroom window, handheld and through double glazing. In fact it was too far away for me to see the bird properly with my eyes so it was only when I looked at the images that I realised what I had photographed . Long Tailed Tits are fairly rare visitors to our garden

  

THANKS FOR YOUR VISITING BUT CAN I ASK YOU NOT TO FAVE AN IMAGE WITHOUT ALSO MAKING A COMMENT. MANY THANKS KEITH.

 

ANYONE MAKING MULTIPLE FAVES WITHOUT COMMENTS WILL SIMPLY BE BLOCKED

   

Long-tailed Tit - Aegithalos Caudatus

 

The long-tailed tit is globally widespread throughout temperate northern Europe and Asia, into boreal Scandinavia and south into the Mediterranean zone. It inhabits deciduous and mixed woodland with a well-developed shrub layer, favouring edge habitats. It can also be found in scrub, heathland with scattered trees, bushes and hedges, in farmland and riverine woodland, parks and gardens. The bird's year-round diet of insects and social foraging bias habitat choice in winter towards deciduous woodland, typically of oak, ash and locally sycamore species. For nesting, strong preference is shown towards scrub areas. The nest is often built in thorny bushes less than 3 metres above the ground.

 

The nest of the long-tailed tit is constructed from four materials - lichen, feathers, spider egg cocoons and moss, with over 6,000 pieces used for a typical nest. The nest is a flexible sac with a small, round entrance on top, suspended either low in a gorse or bramble bush or high up in the forks of tree branches. The structural stability of the nest is provided by a mesh of moss and spider silk. The tiny leaves of the moss act as hooks and the spider silk of egg cocoons provides the loops; thus forming a natural form of velcro. The tit lines the outside with hundreds of flakes of pale lichens - this provides camouflage. Inside, it lines the nest with more than 2,000 downy feathers to insulate the nest. Nests suffer a high rate of predation with only 17% success.

 

Outside the breeding season they form compact flocks of 6 to 17 birds, composed of family parties (parents and offspring) from the previous breeding season, together with any extra adults that helped to raise a brood. These flocks will occupy and defend territories against neighbouring flocks. The driving force behind the flocking behaviour is thought to be that of winter roosting, being susceptible to cold; huddling increases survival through cold nights.

 

From July to February, the non-breeding season, long-tailed tits form flocks of relatives and non-relatives, roosting communally. When the breeding season begins, the flocks break up, and the birds attempt to breed in monogamous pairs. Males remain within the winter territory, while females have a tendency to wander to neighbouring territories.

 

Pairs whose nests fail have three choices: try again, abandon nesting for the season or help at a neighbouring nest. It has been shown that failed pairs split and help at the nests of male relatives, recognition being established vocally. The helped nests have greater success due to higher provisioning rates and better nest defence. At the end of the breeding season, in June–July, the birds reform the winter flocks in their winter territory.

 

Population:

 

UK breeding:

 

340,000 territories

An exercise walk at Dinton Pastures.

 

Thank you to all who take the time to comment and/or fave my images, it is much appreciated.

A beautiful starling on a bad perch...

 

Kololi - Serekunda

The Gambia

Taken Stour Valley Nature Reserve, Bournemouth, Dorset

Managed to get a shot of this Long-tailed Tit with nesting materials before he disappeared into the trees. Taken on a local walk this afternoon.

 

Many thanks to all who take the time to view, comment or fave my images.

  

in our garden yesterday afternoon

 

also called Long-tailed Bushtit

Aegithalos caudatus

staartmees

Orite à longue queue

Schwanzmeise

 

Your views, favorites and supportive comments are highly appreciated.

 

All rights reserved. ButsFons©2019

Please do not use my photos on websites, blogs or in any other media without my explicit permission.

also called Long-tailed Bushtit

aegithalos caudatus

staartmees

orite à longue queue

Schwanzmeise

 

Many thanks for your views, favorites and supportive comments.

 

All rights reserved. ButsFons©2020

Please do not use my photos on websites, blogs or in any other media without my explicit permission.

An exercise walk at Dinton Pastures.

 

Thank you to all who take the time to comment and/or fave my images, it is much appreciated.

I was saddened yesterday to find someone has stolen 3 feeders in my wood area it was quite a hidden area its been fine for months I had told one person recently and he feeds the birds by just throwing seeds on the ground and a cheap fat feeder not actually saying it is this person but who steals feeders I had to get good ones to stop the squirrels destroying cheap ones. They even went in my storage bin and took a mesh acorn nut one that can't be left out because of squirrels at the moment there is only 2 fat feeders left. :-(

 

I don't have a garden and loved this place and don't really want to move everything....

Long-tailed Tit - Aegithalos Caudatus

  

Slightly textured had to remove a few twigs

also called Long-tailed Bushtit

aegithalos caudatus

staartmees

orite à longue queue

Schwanzmeise

 

Many thanks for your views, favorites and supportive comments.

 

All rights reserved. ButsFons©2020

Please do not use my photos on websites, blogs or in any other media without my explicit permission.

Female Long-tailed Duck in flight. Every time a ship would come in the canal, the ducks all took to the air.

 

20191117 9073

Two shots of my last visit to San Gerardo de Dota and of course two moountain birds. It is a long time ago I could make shots of this very beautiful member of the flycatcher family and I'm really proud of this shot, My Swiss friend Hans has a wonderful video of them. Two shots before my German friends to prepare them for this place)

Please click for the larger image to see all details! Thank you for all the views, comments and fav. It is very much appreciated, though the written comments are the most interesting! Use of this image on websites, blogs or other media without explicit permission is not permitted. © Jan H. Boer 2019

Long tailed Duck (F) - Clangula Hyemalis

 

Llanelli

 

Rare vagrant to UK.

Long-Tailed Tit - Aegithalos Caudatus

 

Thank you to all who take the time to comment/fave it is much appreciated.

Thank you to all that take the time to comment and/or fave it is much appreciated.

Thank you to all who take the time to comment and/or fave my images, it is much appreciated.

Long tailed Duck (f) - Clangula Hyemalis

 

Llanelli

 

Diving duck that favors saltwater in winter and Arctic tundra pools in summer. Males are distinctive with black, white, gray, and brown patterns and long pointed tail. Male plumage changes dramatically from winter to summer. Females and immature males are brownish overall with whiter face and large dark cheek patch. Dives frequently to feed mainly on invertebrates.

Long Tailed Duck captured near, Hamilton, Ontario.

 

Thank you very much for your visits, comments, and faves, very much appreciated! Have a great day!

 

DELIGHTFUL and often confiding little bird with a aproportionately long tail, and seemingly spheical body, a lot of people call them feather dusters. Mainly associated with deciduous woodland, they form small flocks that are rather nomadic in their habits,

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THANK YOU, for your visit, and kind comments, will return the visit to your photostream and comment on your latest image.

Do stay well and safe, God bless...................................Tomx.

=========================================

"GODs BEAUTY is SIMPLY AMAZING !"

Long Tailed Duck - Clangula Hyemalis

 

Diving duck that favors saltwater in winter and Arctic tundra pools in summer. Males are distinctive with black, white, gray, and brown patterns and long pointed tail. Male plumage changes dramatically from winter to summer. Females and immature males are brownish overall with whiter face and large dark cheek patch. Dives frequently to feed mainly on invertebrates.

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