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This is New Routemaster LTZ 1779 captured in Regent St on route 3 to Crystal Palace in South London. The New Routemaster has also been known as New Bus for London and Borismaster. It is a diesel-electric hybrid double-decker bus manufactured by Wrightbus of Ballymena, Northern Ireland. It differs from other London buses having a "hop-on hop-off" rear open platform similar to the original Routemaster. The first bus entered service on 27 February 2012. The cost of each bus is approximately £350,000.

The Calvary is a religious, bricked and walkable monument on the Frauenberg in the municipality of Ardning and is a protected monument.

The Calvary, built in 1823, lies east of the Catholic Church of the Parish Church of the Virgin Mary, on an elongated elevation with a slight inclination of the longitudinal direction, and now functions as a place of reflection.

It was presumed that the circular monument was built at the site where once a medieval or even older fortification was built. The access path to the entrance is on the western side of the Calvary and leads over the elongated elevation along an avenue, which is lined with columns of saints on columns. The open platform with the crucifixion group is located above a few uphill steps. Opposite, in a niche with the body Jesus stands a painted lettering from the fact that the monument was renovated in the years 1897, 1950 and 1991. Via downhill steps one reaches an outer gallery leading around the circular monument. This tour leads along 16 stations (niches). There is a religious sculpture in every niche. ( Wikipedia ).

 

Otter Road bus stand. See in comments.

 

RTs – AEC Regents

 

Front - RT4022 / LUC181. New 1951 – Wombwell 1975. Ref. Ian's Bus Stop RTs – Non Roof Box.

 

Following – Possibly RT3585 / MLL895.

 

The other buses unknown identification.

 

Photographer Mega Anorak.

Steam locomotive 99 7247-2 of the Harz Narrow Gauge Railways (German: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen or HSB) en route from the town of Wernigerode to the Brocken (the highest point (1,141 m) of the Harz mountains).

The Harz Narrow Gauge Railways is a network of 1,000 mm gauge railways in the Harz mountains, in central Germany. It connects the principal towns of Wernigerode, Nordhausen and Quedlinburg and several smaller towns in the area with about 140 kilometres of track, much of which is steeply graded and picturesque.

The most popular destination on the network is the Brocken, an old Soviet listening post on top of the tallest peak in the Harz mountains, accessed by a spiral railway line, the Brocken Railway.

The railway is notable for running a significant number of its trains with steam haulage, mostly employing 1950s vintage 2-10-2 tank locomotives, hauling traditional open-platform bogie carriages.

The trains run daily to a timetable and it operates more than ten steam locomotives and seven diesel railbuses.

 

Stoomlocomotief 99 7247-2 van de Harzer Smalspoorbanen (Duits: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen of HSB) onderweg van de stad Wernigerode naar de Brocken (met 1.141 meter het hoogste punt van het Harz middelgebergte).

De spoorwijdte is 1000 millimeter (meterspoor).

De standaardspoorbreedte; normaalspoor is 1435 millimeter.

De Harzer Schmalspurbahnen GmbH (HSB) is, met een totale spoorlengte van 140,4 kilometer, het grootste smalspoorbedrijf van Duitsland. De HSB vervoert circa 1 miljoen mensen per jaar.

De HSB heeft in totaal 44 stations, 25 stoomlocomotieven, 16 diesellocomotieven, 10 motorwagens en circa 230 werknemers.

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All rights reserved. Copyright © Martien Uiterweerd. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission.

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A double-decker bus is a bus that has two storeys or decks. Double-decker buses are used for mass transport in the United Kingdom, Europe, Asia and many former European possessions, the most iconic example being the red London bus.

 

Early double-deckers put the driver in a separate cab. Passenger access was via an open platform at the rear, and a bus conductor would collect fares. Modern double-deckers have a main entrance door at the front, and the driver takes fares, thus halving the number of bus workers aboard, but slowing the boarding process. The rear open platform, popular with passengers, was abandoned for safety reasons, as there was a risk of passengers falling when running and jumping onto the bus.

 

England: Tea, Big Ben, bowler hats and red buses. One of those things is about be be dragged, kicking and screaming, into the 21st Century.

 

It's the famous red double-decker bus of course, much as we'd like to see today's young people going about their business in bowler hats rather than baseball caps.

 

Thanks to Volvo, London's fleet of red buses is gaining a hybrid drivetrain to mitigate inner-city pollution levels from the traditional diesel engines

  

Steam locomotive 99 7247-2 of the Harz Narrow Gauge Railways (German: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen or HSB) en route from the town of Wernigerode to the Brocken (the highest point (1,141 m) of the Harz mountains).

The Harz Narrow Gauge Railways is a network of 1,000 mm gauge railways in the Harz mountains, in central Germany. It connects the principal towns of Wernigerode, Nordhausen and Quedlinburg and several smaller towns in the area with about 140 kilometres of track, much of which is steeply graded and picturesque.

The most popular destination on the network is the Brocken, an old Soviet listening post on top of the tallest peak in the Harz mountains, accessed by a spiral railway line, the Brocken Railway.

The railway is notable for running a significant number of its trains with steam haulage, mostly employing 1950s vintage 2-10-2 tank locomotives, hauling traditional open-platform bogie carriages.

The trains run daily to a timetable and it operates more than ten steam locomotives and seven diesel railbuses.

 

Stoomlocomotief 99 7247-2 van de Harzer Smalspoorbanen (Duits: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen of HSB) onderweg van de stad Wernigerode naar de Brocken (met 1.141 meter het hoogste punt van het Harz middelgebergte).

De spoorwijdte is 1000 millimeter (meterspoor).

De standaardspoorbreedte; normaalspoor is 1435 millimeter.

De Harzer Schmalspurbahnen GmbH (HSB) is, met een totale spoorlengte van 140,4 kilometer, het grootste smalspoorbedrijf van Duitsland. De HSB vervoert circa 1 miljoen mensen per jaar.

De HSB heeft in totaal 44 stations, 25 stoomlocomotieven, 16 diesellocomotieven, 10 motorwagens en circa 230 werknemers.

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All rights reserved. Copyright © Martien Uiterweerd. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission.

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A double-decker bus is a bus that has two storeys or decks. Double-decker buses are used for mass transport in the United Kingdom, Europe, Asia and many former European possessions, the most iconic example being the red London bus.

 

Early double-deckers put the driver in a separate cab. Passenger access was via an open platform at the rear, and a bus conductor would collect fares. Modern double-deckers have a main entrance door at the front, and the driver takes fares, thus halving the number of bus workers aboard, but slowing the boarding process. The rear open platform, popular with passengers, was abandoned for safety reasons, as there was a risk of passengers falling when running and jumping onto the bus.

 

England: Tea, Big Ben, bowler hats and red buses. One of those things is about be be dragged, kicking and screaming, into the 21st Century.

 

It's the famous red double-decker bus of course, much as we'd like to see today's young people going about their business in bowler hats rather than baseball caps.

 

Thanks to Volvo, London's fleet of red buses is gaining a hybrid drivetrain to mitigate inner-city pollution levels from the traditional diesel engines

  

Steam locomotive of the Harz Narrow Gauge Railways (German: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen or HSB) en route from the town of Wernigerode to the Brocken (the highest point (1,141 m) of the Harz mountains).

The Harz Narrow Gauge Railways is a network of 1,000 mm gauge railways in the Harz mountains, in central Germany. It connects the principal towns of Wernigerode, Nordhausen and Quedlinburg and several smaller towns in the area with about 140 kilometres of track, much of which is steeply graded and picturesque.

The most popular destination on the network is the Brocken, an old Soviet listening post on top of the tallest peak in the Harz mountains, accessed by a spiral railway line, the Brocken Railway.

The railway is notable for running a significant number of its trains with steam haulage, mostly employing 1950s vintage 2-10-2 tank locomotives, hauling traditional open-platform bogie carriages.

The trains run daily to a timetable and it operates more than ten steam locomotives and seven diesel railbuses.

 

Stoomlocomotief van de Harzer Smalspoorbanen (Duits: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen of HSB) onderweg van de stad Wernigerode naar de Brocken (met 1.141 meter het hoogste punt van het Harz middelgebergte).

De spoorwijdte is 1000 millimeter (meterspoor).

De standaardspoorbreedte; normaalspoor is 1435 millimeter.

De Harzer Schmalspurbahnen GmbH (HSB) is, met een totale spoorlengte van 140,4 kilometer, het grootste smalspoorbedrijf van Duitsland. De HSB heeft in totaal 44 stations, 25 stoomlocomotieven, 16 diesellocomotieven, 10 motorwagens en circa 230 werknemers. De HSB vervoert circa 1 miljoen mensen per jaar.

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All rights reserved. Copyright © Martien Uiterweerd. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission.

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The Harz Narrow Gauge Railways (Harzer Schmalspurbahnen or HSB) is one of the world’s last big and daily operational steam companies, with 25 steam locomotives and a 140 kilometre 1,000 mm gauge network. The company was founded after the Second World War as a merger of two earlier companies (the Gernrode-Harzgerode Railway Company and the Nordhausen-Wernigerode Railway Company). After the WWII their entire network fell within the Soviet Zone, later East Germany. The GHE and NWE were subordinated to the East German Deutsche Reichsbahn on 1 April 1949

 

It’s network connects the principal towns of Wernigerode, Nordhausen and Quedlinburg and several smaller settlements in the area. Much of the network is steeply graded and picturesquely situated, but the most popular destination is the mountain Brocken, the highest mountain in the region and a former surveillance installation for the Ministry for State Security (Stasi) of the old DDR. You can see in the Brocken Transmitter and other installations in the background on the right. Left from the big transmitter station you can see a smaller – but still tall – building. The radome on the roof holds air traffic control radar equipment and was places there in 1991. The Brocken Transmitter is now property of Deutsche Telekom. Until 1990 this was a military area and obviously not open to the public.

 

The HSB runs a significant number of its trains with steam haulage, mostly employing 1950s vintage 2-10-2 tank locomotives, hauling traditional open-platform bogie carriages.

The company is now primarily owned by the various local authorities whose territories it serves. Shareholders are the districts of Harz and Nordhausen, the communes along the railways, the town of Quedlinburg, the municipality of Tanne and the spa company of Braunlage. Its head office is in Wernigerode, where its workshops and locomotive depot are located.

 

Technical stuff

This a single shot photo at 320ISO, f8.0, -2/3 1/600 and 45.5mils. Post-production was done with PS CC. This included a black-and-white conversion with a PS-filter, balancing the lighting in the landscape and the sky, enhancing the lighting on the train pulling into the station and highlighting the twinkle parts leftover from the rain earlier that day. The latter triggered me to create a sunray effect you can often see in the moist sky just after the rain has passed. The sunrays were created by selecting a colour range, fiddling a bit with fuzziness (@70) and the range (@61%) and introduce this as a new layer. I then developed this layer further by pulling it through a radial blur filter, set in zoom mode, and changing the angle to the upper right hand corner. This created the initial effect. After that I removed some rays in different parts of the photo as they did not look natural in the photo. This was partly the fact on the left hand side; the you can see the strong silhouette of the lighting and signalling tower. To finalize the whole procedure I reduced the opacity of the rays-layer to 57%.

Finally I added some small copyright signs. The latter is, alas, there to stay due to the frequent copying of my photos. So, don't bother commenting on that.

 

The CTA Holiday Train runs as several pairs of train cars with an open platform between them for Santa to sit on, but on its final run of the season on the Yellow Line (which uses just 2 coupled cars per train), Santa gets to ride IN the train car! I caught some of the very last trips of 2015 (and did ride the Holiday Train a little on every L line it ran on).

A double-decker bus is a bus that has two storeys or decks. Double-decker buses are used for mass transport in the United Kingdom, Europe, Asia and many former European possessions, the most iconic example being the red London bus.

 

Early double-deckers put the driver in a separate cab. Passenger access was via an open platform at the rear, and a bus conductor would collect fares. Modern double-deckers have a main entrance door at the front, and the driver takes fares, thus halving the number of bus workers aboard, but slowing the boarding process. The rear open platform, popular with passengers, was abandoned for safety reasons, as there was a risk of passengers falling when running and jumping onto the bus.

 

England: Tea, Big Ben, bowler hats and red buses. One of those things is about be be dragged, kicking and screaming, into the 21st Century.

 

It's the famous red double-decker bus of course, much as we'd like to see today's young people going about their business in bowler hats rather than baseball caps.

 

Thanks to Volvo, London's fleet of red buses is gaining a hybrid drivetrain to mitigate inner-city pollution levels from the traditional diesel engines

  

The Museum of Transport Greater Manchester is known for its collection of vehicles, but in fact they're just part of our materials that tell the story of road passenger transport in our region. We also have tens of thousands of documents, photos, timetables and everything from badges to bus stops.

 

One of the pleasures of browsing our archives is discovering the little day-to-day minutiae of bus operation - a letter to a passenger, instructions on changing a bus terminus, a complaint about a bus shelter. One of our favourites is the accident register - a book kept by each company recording the bumps and scrapes that are inevitable if you're running a fleet of large vehicles all day on busy roads.

 

This is just one page of the accident records of the Lancashire United Transport company (LUT) of Atherton, west of Manchester - it was at one time the UK's biggest independent bus operator. This page covers just a few days, specifically the 20th to 25th August 1942. The wartime blackout probably didn't help but most of the accidents are pretty routine. Each entry meticulously records the bus number, the names of the crew, the location of the accident, the names and address of witnesses and the nature of the mishap.

 

Reading from the top of this page the list of accidents is a list of minor misfortunes. The entries say 'van collided with bus'; 'bus collided with waggon gauge'; 'bus collided with wall in avoiding tractor' (we think the inspector made have 'had words' about that one); 'van collided with bus'; 'leaving in motion' (a constant hazard with open platform buses); and then, with a start, you see the next entry - 'child run over'. And next to it, in red capital letters, the simple, bald commentary 'FATAL'.

 

At 1.35pm on Sunday 23rd August 1942, young Ann Whittall of Cypress Road, Salford - close to where the M602 motorway now meets the M60 - wandered into nearby Barton Road and was run over by LUT bus number 133 driven by Driver T. Marshall - who probably never forgot that moment. Ann was just 2 years and 9 months old.

 

The inquest was held amazingly quickly, the following day in fact, when the Coroner recorded a verdict of accidental death. The last column records payments - 'TRD' (probably an abbreviation but we don't know what for) for £2.2.0, and a J. Monks was paid 17/6d - £0.75 in modern pounds sterling. And that was that - we've checked the Manchester Guardian newspaper for that week and we can't find any mention. Road deaths were more common then and this was the height of the second world war: but for those those involved, life would never be the same again.

 

Buses are fun, studying the history of buses is fascinating, but occasionally you come across stories where the cost of history was high.

 

If you'd like to know more about the Museum of Transport Greater Manchester and its collection of vintage buses, go to www.motgm.uk.

 

© Greater Manchester Transport Society. All rights reserved. Unauthorised reproduction is strictly prohibited and may result in action being taken to protect the intellectual property interests of the Society.

This remarkable vehicle was for many years Stockton's only single-deck bus. Leyland surprised the market with the Olympic, its first underfloor-engined model. Not only was it of integral construction but the bodywork was by MCW rather than its own bodybuilding department.

 

Stockton Corporation possibly created as much surprise locally, not only by purchasing a single example of the new model but by specifying a rear entrance and front exit. Delivered in 1951, MPT 858 (fleet number 26) seated 41 passengers rather than the standard 44. It must have been difficult to judge the success of a single vehicle of such unconventional layout in a fleet that was otherwise made up entirely of traditional open-platform double-deckers. The only thing that we can be sure of is that it remained unique, although Stockton returned to the concept of dual door single-deckers in its twilight years - albeit with a front entrance and centre exit.

 

As far as the home market was concerned, the Olympic was soon succeeded in Leyland's catalogue by the Royal Tiger, marking a return to conventional body-on-chassis construction (16-Jan-10).

 

STRICTLY COPYRIGHT: You may download a copy of any image for your personal use, but it would be an offence to remove the copyright information or to post it elsewhere without the express permission of the copyright owner.

Deep below the tortuous streets of the Outlaw city known as the Shade, on valley floors roofed with layer upon layer of city, in caves entombed below foundations, lies the Goblin District. These dank chambers where no human foot ever dares to tread, and no ray of sun ever penetrates, are crowded with goblins. These outcasts of outcasts live in cramped stone cells built into the rock. The streets are a haphazard, bewildering vertical maze of slowly decaying wood platforms. The air is still and foul, and the murk is only broken by dim smoky torches. All the refuse of the city above slowly filters down into the goblin district.

Naturally, this suits the inhabitants quite well, and they consider it the pinnacle of modern urban planning.

 

A thriving trade is conducted on open platforms, or wherever convenient. Traveling merchants traverse the district, bringing goods from neighborhood to neighborhood. Other enterprising traders travel up into the human districts, where the best of Rowia’s finery,* can be purchased from the Shade’s primary importers. **

 

Merchants or anyone can use the district’s wood and rope roadway system, which connects every corner of the district. This system also promotes physical exercise, as getting anywhere requires climbing ropes and crossing minimalist rope bridges. The platforms and bridges are maintained in working condition at no cost to the city, by roadway users. If something collapses, the next goblin who needs to get through the area either repairs it, or goes around.

 

Food is provided by the district’s farmers who grow fungi, chickens, and pigs. These in turn feed on the area’s primary resource, the waste which filters down from the city above.

 

Stone for building material is unlimited, and the more is quarried, the more living space is produced. Lumber for platforms is harvested by special crews of lumberers. They roam the upper districts of the Shade, looking for buildings which don’t seem to be in use.*** These are hastily dismantled and the wood is hauled down to the Goblin District.

 

At the roots of the utterly lawless Shade, the Goblin Districts have developed a rough sense of democracy in order to coexist in such close quarters. If any goblin feels he has been wronged, the accused and accuser together collect a jury of whoever is nearby, who give a verdict and declare a punishment or reparations, if necessary. Anyone who refuses to follow these impromptu rulings is expelled or eliminated. To help keep the peace, all violently-inclined goblins are sent out of the district to the Outlaw lands above, where they work as mercenaries for various bandit leaders. This system, besides removing dangerous elements of society, is one of the major sources of cash income to the district. It is also responsible for the goblins’ nasty reputation in the other factions, but they care not at all, as the upper lands are regarded as totally barbaric.

 

* That no one else wants.

** A.k.a. thieving gangs.

*** Unfortunately, mistakes are sometimes made, and lumberer casualties from irate homeowners do occur, though most don’t put up much of a fuss.

 

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A build for Lands of Rowia, a LEGO castle group in which members create a character and then use Lego builds to tell their story in a shared LEGO castle world. LoR also features motivational contests and challenges. We are currently looking for new members, so come on over, pick a faction and join the fun!

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Also an entry to the Traveling Salesman category of CCC XIV

 

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Comments, critique, and criticism welcome.

Thanks for over 6.000.000 views

 

Steam locomotive of the Harz Narrow Gauge Railways (German: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen or HSB) en route from the town of Wernigerode to the Brocken (the highest point (1,141 m) of the Harz mountains).

The Harz Narrow Gauge Railways is a network of 1,000 mm gauge railways in the Harz mountains, in central Germany. It connects the principal towns of Wernigerode, Nordhausen and Quedlinburg and several smaller towns in the area with about 140 kilometres of track, much of which is steeply graded and picturesque.

The most popular destination on the network is the Brocken, an old Soviet listening post on top of the tallest peak in the Harz mountains, accessed by a spiral railway line, the Brocken Railway.

The railway is notable for running a significant number of its trains with steam haulage, mostly employing 1950s vintage 2-10-2 tank locomotives, hauling traditional open-platform bogie carriages.

The trains run daily to a timetable and it operates more than ten steam locomotives and seven diesel railbuses.

 

Stoomlocomotief van de Harzer Smalspoorbanen (Duits: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen of HSB) onderweg van de stad Wernigerode naar de Brocken (met 1.141 meter het hoogste punt van het Harz middelgebergte).

De spoorwijdte is 1000 millimeter (meterspoor). De standaardspoorbreedte; normaalspoor is 1435 millimeter.

De Harzer Schmalspurbahnen GmbH (HSB) is, met een totale spoorlengte van 140,4 kilometer, het grootste smalspoorbedrijf van Duitsland. De HSB heeft in totaal 44 stations, 25 stoomlocomotieven, 16 diesellocomotieven, 10 motorwagens en circa 230 werknemers. De HSB vervoert circa 1 miljoen mensen per jaar.

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All rights reserved. Copyright © Martien Uiterweerd. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission.

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Bijwagen 53 is de enige bijwagen van de Kreisbahn die nog over open balkons beschikt. In de jaren dertig was dit ongemoderniseerde aanhangrijtuig gedegradeerd tot kantoortje in de werkplaats van het trambedrijf. Wegens materieelgebrek in de oorlogsjaren is de bijwagen gereviseerd en weer voor tramdienst in gebruik genomen. In de naoorlogse jaren is de bijwagen als versterkingsrijtuig in gebruik gebleven.

 

Dit is een door mij aangepast model op basis van LGB-aanhangrijtuig 3500. De Öffentliche Kreisbahn" is mijn streektrambedrijf op schaal 1 : 22,5.

 

Meer foto's van mijn modellen vindt u in de set "Öffentliche Kreisbahn".

 

Bekijk mijn fotoalbum in de klassieke versie.

RT44 and RT54 have recently changed hands in preservation. EnsignBus are storing them for the new owner at present.

A train of open platform wooden L cars rolls past Wilson Shop. At the time of this photo the old Lower Yard was still in operation (remaining from the days when Wilson was the northern terminus of the Northwestern Elevated).

 

B&W print in my collection, photographer unknown.

RAUM Leidsche Rijn Centrum Utrecht (Netherlands)

SIGMA SD Quattro

18-35

 

Raum is an open platform in LRC to explore and to create. To think and question the future of urban areas and it's people through art and design.

New Haven Railroad open platform clerestory AC-DC powered MU and a trailer (MUTs) are seen at a yard while in excursion service, ca 1940's. Some of these old original MUTs lasted into 1955. Have ridden in one of these in 1954, from New Haven to New York City during the summer on a hot day, The air conditioning was provided by open end doors and open windows, along with speed.

 

The name of the photographer is unknown and it came from a photo that was on the Internet. This photo has been cropped and modified from the original to improve its appearance.

 

Copyright Disclaimer under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for the purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

The line 7N also known as "Djurgårdslinjen" is a heritage tram line between Normalmstorg and Waldemarsudde in Stockholm. Wagon 24 was built in 1904 for Stockholms Södra Spårvägsaktiebolag and is the oldest wagon in service on Stockholms tram tracks. You can take a ride with the normal tickets from Storstockholms Lokaltrafik and i really enjoied it on the open platform. Greetings are going to the nice driver.

 

Die Linie 7N, auch bekannt als "Djurgårdenslinjen" ist eine Museumsstraßenbahnlinie von Normalmstorg nach Waldemarsudde in Stockholm. Der hier gezeigte Wagen 24 wurde 1904 für Stockholms Södra Spårvägsaktiebolag gebaut und ist das älteste betriebsfähige Fahrzeug auf Stockholms Straßenbahngleisen. Man kann die Linie mit den normalen Fahrkarten von Storstockholms Lokaltrafik nutzen und ich habe die Fahrt auf der offenen Plattform sehr genossen. Grüße gehen auch an den netten Fahrer

Back in the 1970s, life as a young bus enthusiast was full of discoveries. You could travel around the country, happen upon operators in virtually every town and village, and the vehicle variety was astounding. I recognise that those a generation older than I will want to say, 'you should have seen it 30 years before' and no doubt they're right, but that doesn't take away the feeling of wonder which went hand in glove with the hobby of our youth.

In the mid '70s I'd discovered the delights of several of our local North Staffordshire independents, principal of which was Berresfords Motors of Cheddleton. Fleet standardisation was never a concern, and buses were largely acquired if they were perceived to be a bargain ... often in multiples.

Imagine my delight therefore when Berresfords secured the Staffordshire County Council contract to provide school transport to the baths at the school I attended. The firm were never one to let convention rule them, and on odd occasions we saw things like their full fronted, open platform ex Blackpool Corporation Leyland Titan PD2, NFV 237. Imagine the apoplexy if such a bus turned up to transport school children nowadays!

Anyway, having reversed towards the main entrance to collect the next load, recently acquired ex East Kent Park Royal bodied AEC Reliance WFN 511 is seen. At this stage the bus hadn't yet been painted into livery and still wore its NBC 'Local Coach' poppy red and white.

This is a re-scan of one of my earliest negatives, sorry its not as sharp as it might have been.

An excursion dubbed the "Mountain Express" heads west on NJ Transit's Bergen County Line behind "Erie" E8As 835 & 834. The duo is leading an interesting assortment of equipment including a few private cars, NJ Transit/Metro-North commuter cars and NJT 1 (NJ Transit's former CNJ open platform observation car). The units are arranged correctly per the Erie tradition of facing odd-numbered E8s west and even east.

 

Mountain Express:

ERIE 835 E8A (ex-PRR 5788)

ERIE 834 E8A (ex-NYC 4076)

 

October 1992

TBT: Ten Years Ago In Providence By Providence Looking To The Future Now Past - IMRAN™

Exactly 10 years and 2 weeks ago I was visiting a beloved friend whom I have known since 1989 during our studies at Columbia University. Over the next 20 years, we stayed in close contact.

The 2008-2009 near-depression economic meltdown brought on by the two wars started by the previous worst-bozo in the White House, George W. Bush, had been devastating to so many, including me. I had left my job to spend time with my Dad in Pakistan in mid-to-late 2008. He died at the end of 2008 and by the time I came back to the USA in March 2009 at the height of the financial crisis so many seem to forget, I had lost almost everything I had worked 20+ years to build.

By the grace of God, and divine providence, when this photo was taken in Providence, Rhode Island, in 2010 the slow but steady Obama recovery had kicked in. In some ways, I am still catching up and recovering from the damage it did to my finances.

The ongoing Obama recovery at that time had helped. That economic recovery and period of longest growth would last for a decade -- until the total incompetence of the stupidest person (and worst ever criminal to be in the White House) Donald Trump, and his sheer stupidity in handling the pandemic brought that continuing expansion to a stop.

However, while I fear for the future of democracy in this great nation, and the threats of fascism, white supremacy, and worse seem to be the open platform for a sizable minority, just like at the end of 2008, when a positive change was in the air, I am confident that we Americans will correct our course and be an even greater America than any demagogic red hat slogan can claim. Throwback Thursday photo October 1, 2010, taken with an iPhone 4.

 

© 2010-2020 IMRAN™

 

IMG_0969

Locomotive 46 036 is heading the lengthy freight train 20603 from Iliyantsi to Mezdra with petrol tank wagons and open platforms loaded with sheet steel rolls. Out of the frame on the back of the train is the banking loco 43 547

New Haven Railroad ALCO H-1 class Atlantic steam locomotive # 1110, is seen in a yard with an employee walking across the tracks by the locomotive's pilot, ca 1930's. The locomotives is this class all became superheated between 1912-1922. Originally these locomotive when built were classed as F-1, but after 1927, they became the H-1 class. You may note that two different styles of marker - classification lamps are being used on the is locomotive.

 

The name of the photographer is unknown and it came from a photo that was on the Internet. This photo has been cropped and modified from the original to improve its appearance.

 

Copyright Disclaimer under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for the purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Attached to the "Lake Michigan" at Union Station was another business car, #99 the "Choctaw." If I was to become an official on my future employer's service, this would be my preferred conveyance. I'm sure that by the time I was working for the Rock in '72, this car was history. But meanwhile, pass me another cigar, please, while I soak in the sounds and sensations of an open platform ride on this baby!

Interesting view snapped from an open platform gate car- looks like Sedgwick.

 

B&W print in my collection, photographer unknown.

Looking back some 15 years to the space now occupied by Poznan's Galeria, a Warszawa-Zielona Gora service at 11.47 headed by EP08-007 stands at the one-time open platforms.

The background main building dates from Prussian Posen having received a period cladding face-lift.

22nd February 2004

vertigo ...

 

;-) ...

 

ƒ/8.0

85.0 mm

1/200

80

 

_NYC4580_pa2

You all know this spot is one of my favorites on the corridor and though it lacks variety it somewhat compensates for that in train volume. But once in while something different passes through. While diesels of several models pass here more than 30 times a day they are usually of the purple variety. Seeing an Amtrak diesel is rather uncommon and worthy of shooting when it happens.

 

This is an 865 test extra behind P42 114 with the Beech Grove open platform car on the rear approaching MP 198 on Track 1 of Amtrak's New Haven Line.

 

They were following outbound Keolis train 805 and despite what the clock reads on the tower of the Second Congregational Church it is not 0530 in the morning!

 

Attleboro, Massachusetts

Monday October 19, 2020

This suprisingly scenic spot at the east end of the platform in Attleboro is one of my favorites on the corridor. Though it lacks variety it compensates for that in train volume, and then every once in while something different passes through! Giiven its ease of access and proximity to home it's always worth a try to shoot the unusual.

 

Passenger diesels of several models pass here more than 30 times a day but they are exclusively of the purple variety. Seeing an Amtrak diesel powered train is rather uncommon and worthy of shooting when they do occur in a land where Acelas and ACS64s otherwise rule.

 

This is an 865 test extra behind P42 114 with the Beech Grove open platform car on the rear approaching MP 198 on Track 1 of Amtrak's New Haven Line. They were following outbound Keolis train 805 and would continue on to New Haven where the train would be looped and test right back east to Boston.

 

Attleboro, Massachusetts

Monday October 19, 2020

Steam locomotive of the Harz Narrow Gauge Railways (German: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen or HSB) en route from the town of Wernigerode to the Brocken (the highest point (1,141 m) of the Harz mountains).

The Harz Narrow Gauge Railways is a network of 1,000 mm gauge railways in the Harz mountains, in central Germany. It connects the principal towns of Wernigerode, Nordhausen and Quedlinburg and several smaller towns in the area with about 140 kilometres of track, much of which is steeply graded and picturesque.

The most popular destination on the network is the Brocken, an old Soviet listening post on top of the tallest peak in the Harz mountains, accessed by a spiral railway line, the Brocken Railway.

The railway is notable for running a significant number of its trains with steam haulage, mostly employing 1950s vintage 2-10-2 tank locomotives, hauling traditional open-platform bogie carriages.

The trains run daily to a timetable and it operates more than ten steam locomotives and seven diesel railbuses.

 

Stoomlocomotief van de Harzer Smalspoorbanen (Duits: Harzer Schmalspurbahnen of HSB) onderweg van de stad Wernigerode naar de Brocken (met 1.141 meter het hoogste punt van het Harz middelgebergte).

De spoorwijdte is 1000 millimeter (meterspoor). De standaardspoorbreedte; normaalspoor is 1435 millimeter.

De Harzer Schmalspurbahnen GmbH (HSB) is, met een totale spoorlengte van 140,4 kilometer, het grootste smalspoorbedrijf van Duitsland. De HSB vervoert circa 1 miljoen mensen per jaar.

De HSB heeft in totaal 44 stations, 25 stoomlocomotieven, 16 diesellocomotieven, 10 motorwagens en circa 230 werknemers.

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All rights reserved. Copyright © Martien Uiterweerd. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission.

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A double-decker bus is a bus that has two storeys or decks. Double-decker buses are used for mass transport in the United Kingdom, Europe, Asia and many former European possessions, the most iconic example being the red London bus.

 

Early double-deckers put the driver in a separate cab. Passenger access was via an open platform at the rear, and a bus conductor would collect fares. Modern double-deckers have a main entrance door at the front, and the driver takes fares, thus halving the number of bus workers aboard, but slowing the boarding process. The rear open platform, popular with passengers, was abandoned for safety reasons, as there was a risk of passengers falling when running and jumping onto the bus.

 

England: Tea, Big Ben, bowler hats and red buses. One of those things is about be be dragged, kicking and screaming, into the 21st Century.

 

It's the famous red double-decker bus of course, much as we'd like to see today's young people going about their business in bowler hats rather than baseball caps.

 

Thanks to Volvo, London's fleet of red buses is gaining a hybrid drivetrain to mitigate inner-city pollution levels from the traditional diesel engines

  

Parece que se está haciendo habitual que los lunes el Tramesa con destino Aranda parta de Bilbao al mediodía. Es una buena noticia porque hasta ahora era un tren imposible de fotografiar ya que circulaba siempre a horas intempestivas. Otro cambio a mejor es que ahora lo podamos ver con plataformas abiertas ya que con las bobinas a la vista el tren es más atractivo...siempre que vaya cargado ya que ahora a la vuelta de Aranda este mercante ha perdido la vistosidad que tenía con las cajas cerradas.

 

It seems that it is becoming habitual that on Mondays the Tramesa with destination Aranda leave Bilbao at noon. This is good news because up until now it was a train that could not be photographed since it always circulated at odd hours. Another change for the better is that now we can see it with open platforms because with the coils in sight the train is more attractive ... provided it is loaded because since now on the return from Aranda this freight has lost its attractive with the closed boxes.

The Venetian fortress of Koules dominates the entrance to the Venetian harbour of Heraklion, Crete. The Venetians called it the “Sea Fortress” (Rocca al Mare), but today it is known by its Turkish name, Koules.

 

The mid-15th century found Heraklion inadequately fortified and the harbour tower, the Byzantine Castellum Comunis, weak and useless for purposes of defence. In 1462 the Venetian Senate approved an ambitious programme of fortification of the city, which was to defend both Heraklion and the burgs (suburbs) outside it, according to the principles of the new bastion front system. As part of this project, the harbour tower was demolished in 1523 and replaced by the Koules fortress still standing today.

The natural rocky outcrop at this point of the harbour was banked up extensively to form the platform on which the fortress was to be built, covering an area of 3,600 m2. The work was carried out in a very interesting way: old ships were filled with stone from the island of Dia and sunk off the north side of the mole, forming a breakwater and increasing the space available.

The fortress is a two-storey building with 26 rooms. There were originally five casemates (special areas for cannon) on the ground floor. It soon became apparent, however, that the use of guns indoors was problematic, due to the limited field of vision through the narrow embrasures, and the choking smoke produced on firing. Thus the cannon were moved to open platforms on the upper storey and the casemates were abandoned.

The ground floor also housed a prison and various storage areas for food and munitions.

On the north side of the upper storey, which formed a spacious square, was the lighthouse tower. There were also quarters for the soldiers, the officers and the governor. The fortress also contained its own mill, oven and chapel, ensuring the autonomy of its garrison.

 

The fortress of Koules did not play a particularly important part during the Turkish siege of Chandax (1646-1669), as the Turkish batteries, strategically placed, were able to neutralise its firepower fairly early on and the Turks gained control of the harbour entrance.

Alexandrovsky Park is a park in the State Museum-Reserve “Tsarskoe Selo” located in the city of Pushkin in St. Petersburg, an architectural monument of the 18th-19th centuries.

 

One of the attractions of the park is the so-called “White Tower” – a pavilion built in the style of a medieval knight castle.

The height of the tower is 37.8 meters, it is surrounded by a shallow moat. The tower was built by the architect A.A. Menelas for the sons of Emperor Nicholas I – Grand Dukes of Alexander, Nicholas, Michael, and Constantine in 1821-1827.

  

The children of the emperor were engaged in military and gymnastic exercises here, on the top floor of the tower there was a workshop of the court painter, who gave them lessons in drawing and painting.

  

The facades of the tower are decorated with cast-iron sculptures of knights, on the terrace there are four cast-iron lions.

 

During the Second World War, the White Tower was almost completely destroyed, only the lower part of the building was preserved. The restoration of the monument began in the 1990s and ended in 2012.

  

At the top of the tower there is an open platform, from which you can enjoy a beautiful view of the surroundings.

 

Today, the White Tower is open to visitors and is used as a children’s museum center.

 

youtu.be/D7o89p3cAX8

Old open-platform wooden L car 2223 on the ground as a shed at Skokie Shops, 8-11-64. This row of old wood cars lasted into the late 70's, i remember seeing them at the Shops in 1978.

 

Original slide in my collection, photographer unknown.

A number of the former Green Line/London Country long Routemaster coaches were put back into revenue traffic in the early eighties.

RCL2234 had spent a couple of years as a trainer after being purchased by LT in 1978. In January 1980 London Transport started a major transformation of its RCL fleet.

Starting with RCL2239, Aldenham works removed the doors, door wiring, luggage racks and ash-trays. Vertical handrails were installed in the saloons and on the platform, and the upholstery was completely re-trimmed. At the front, standard RML valances with single headlights were substituted. Red livery with white bullseyes completed the job.

The rear aspect is shown here, with the open platform clearly visible.

The Croydon Shire Hall is a large, single-storeyed timber and galvanised iron building situated in Samwell Street, Croydon. It is one of a group of civic buildings that date to c. 1890.

 

The hall is rectangular, with a square tower centrally located at the street frontage and a later rectangular addition on the western side. An imposing sense of grandeur is achieved by the bell capped tower with its tall flagpole, clockface and ornate cast iron balustrading.

 

Although the main body of the hall is of light hardwood construction with corrugated galvanised iron external sheeting, the tower and the front verandah are lined timber, as is the floor and stage at the rear of the interior.

 

A corrugated galvanised iron sheeted roof is supported on timber trusses and is hipped at the tower end and gabled at the rear; with a separate awning roof over the front verandah.

 

The ceiling of the hall is unlined, although the later additions are fully lined internally with hardboard sheeting.

 

The front verandah has been enlarged by removing part of the original wall lining along the east and west sides of the building, infilled with hardboard internally and metal ribbed sheeting externally and provided with a wrap around band of glass louvred windows. The western extension is constructed similarly, though without the narrow metal awning that shades the louvred windows at the front of the building.

 

At the front entry of the building, doors open either side to the office area within the enclosed verandah and a short passage leads through into the main body of the hall.

 

Above the passage is a projection booth, with an intact movie projector mounted on an open platform, which is situated directly beneath the tower. Access to the booth is through the office in the eastern verandah.

 

Externally, the building is shaded by trees to the east and west and has two detached privies at the rear.

 

Two, apparently early, street lamps are located on the footpath in front of the shire hall. The footpath is finished with early stone pitched gutters.

 

Sheffield Transport service 31 was restricted to single-deckers due to the terrain. In 1954 it took delivery of two Leyland Royal Tiger PSU1/13s with Weymann standee bodywork featuring a rear entrance with open platform. RWA 222 is seen here in Pond Street Bus Station, having been renumbered from 222 to 2.

Amtrak train number P030 makes it's way eastward at Shenandoah Jct WVA on CSXT's Cumberland Subdivision, March 23, 1990. Note that this was during the time that Amtrak was hauling bulk mail on most long distance trains and the Capitol Limited was no exception with three of the MHC (Material Handling Cars) on the headend ahead of the baggage car. Also note this train sported a dome car. The rear of the train had the short lived American Orient Express luxury passenger cars and a surprise guest being Amtrak's inspection car which made it look as if the Capitol was operating an open platform observation car.

Kodachrome 200 Professional, Nikon N8008

Mooseerboden Reservior and Dams. The work on these dams was started by the Nazi Party in 1938 and they were designed to store water for the Tauernkraftwerk Power station. Much of the work during the war years being carried out by slave labour - they were unfinished at the end of the war. They were finally completed with the aid of the Marshall Plan in the late 1940s and early 50s. It has since been updated and modernised over the years and now produces 10% of all the electricity used in Austria - generating 700KWh per year. The dams are reached with the aid of the Larchwand lift. - this is the biggest open platform lift in Europe.

Clark Johnson's "Front Range Explorers" special pauses at the old St Paul Midway Depot after a rare mileage trip.

Equipment: (From rear): Caritas (open platform business car), Cimarron River (ex-Frisco sleeper), ex-Santa Fe or GN “big-dome," NYC 448 dining car; sleepers Colorado Pine, Baton Rouge; beginning with 448 all are painted in IC colors.

In this instance the word refers to what are essentially 'shock absorbers' between two heritage carriages on the Hoorn–Medemblik heritage steam railway in the Netherlands. Access was allowed onto the open platforms between carriages. The trick was to focus on the equipment rather than the track ballast whilst the train rocked and rolled along the 20 km or 12 1/2 mile journey.

 

The photo was taken two years ago.

Iba a contaros las mútiples vicisitudes por las que pasamos ayer para conseguir esta foto en nuestro querido Directo....Pero todo lo vivido pasa a un segundo plano cuando te enteras de que este mismo tren (con la composición de plataformas abiertas) ha descarrilado hoy a escasos metros de este punto que en su día albergó la estación de Sarracín. Afortunadamente la locomotora y los tres primeros vagones se han mantenido sobre la vía por lo que no hay que lamentar desgracias personales. Las fotos que he podido ver muestran un estropicio muy aparatoso, pero nada que ver con otros que he visto en el pasado y que han sido reparados en pocos días. Esperemos que al tratarse de El Directo, una línea siempre maltratada, no se duerman en los laureles los responsables de solucionar el desaguisado y podamos volver a ver en breve estos vistosos bobineros circulando entre Bilbao y Aranda.

 

I was going to tell you about the many vicissitudes we went through yesterday to get this picture in our beloved Directo .... But everything that has happened goes into the background when someone tells you that this same train (with the composition of open platforms) has derailed today a few meters from this point that once housed the Sarracín station. Fortunately, the locomotive and the first three wagons have remained on the road, so there is no need to regret personal misfortunes. The photos that I have seen show a very spectacular mess, but nothing to do with others that I have seen in the past and that have been repaired in a few days. I hope that when it comes to "El Directo", a line always abused, do not sleep on the laurels responsible for solving the mess and we can see again these colorful steel freights circulating between Bilbao and Aranda.

This batch of PD3s was delivered to Stockport in Jan/Feb 1969. This one has been preserved in the Manchester Transport Museum. This particular one was the last rear-loader delivered, in January. Some more with front-entrance bodies were registered the following month. Astonishing that an open platform bus with an exposed radiator was delivered in 1969. Two with front entrance bodywork ordered by Ramsbottom arrived even later that year. www.flickr.com/photos/jp4712/46764243984

Stockport. July 81. I seem to have caught a second generation Titan in the picture as well.

“Bring on the night, the sun is slowly fading away”

 

Self portraits began my photography career. I would beg my dad to use his point in shoot around 2006 during all the hurricanes that would hit my hometown, and for some reason, he wouldn’t allow it. So I would sneak during the afternoon or when he was taking naps, to capture my mood or something around me that showed my emotions in that moment. Maybe he didn’t want something to corrupt my self image or something beyond- that I’ll never know.

Self portraits isn’t something to “boast” your self esteem. In my darkest and lowest times, self esteem didn’t exist. But, I always found a way to connect my emotions portraying my raw self through self portraits. This was my grandmother’s sleeping gown I assume. And something about it made me want to shoot.

If you see me or other photographers taking self portraits, it isn’t a vain thing (for most of that it is). I still struggle with many insecurities but this helped through out my teenage years and early adulthood. It’s something I’ve been apart of for over fifteen years and that’s bizarre to think of. It’s helped in the sense of writing, understanding who I am, and beyond. Some of my greatest friendships began with people who felt the same with self portraits- the sense to vent. I have to thank Flickr for that primarily for giving me an open platform to show art and express my feelings. Self portraits can help in so many aspects. Find what can help you- photography or not, you’ll feel a release.

A Northern Rail Class 156 DMU departs the recently opened Platform 0 at Doncaster. The platform deals with local arrival and departures , this was the 2C40 1953 to Hull.

 

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