new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged pleiades:depicts=103123065

A stone base, built in peperino, for the display of two- to three-foot tall bronze statues. Usually dated to the 3rd c. BCE.

 

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

A stone base, built in peperino, for the display of two- to three-foot tall bronze statues. Usually dated to the 3rd c. BCE.

 

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

Located in Rome's Forum Boarium, the archaeological site of Sant'Omobono boasts a long sequence of religious occupation. This begins around the first quarter of the 6th c. BCE with an Archaic temple, rebuilt once around 530 BCE, and destroyed at the end of the 6th c. The entire area was raised ca. 5 m on a large podium that hosted twin temples of the goddesses Fortuna and Mater Matuta. The temples and precinct were rebuilt several times over the Republican and Imperial periods. Sometime in the 6th c. CE or later, the eastern temple was converted into a church, which was itself rebuilt several times and eventually dedicated to Sant'Omobono. The brick exterior of this church is a product of the 1930s, when the entire neighborhood was cleared of the apartments and other buildings that formed a dense residential area. Since 2009, the Sant'Omobono Project has been studying the archaeological remains of this site.

 

(See "Sacred Area of S. Omobono" on Pleiades)

...at the corner of the Via del Teatro di Marcello and the Vico Jugario, Rome, Italy.

 

An ancient Roman sanctuary dedicated to the goddesses Mater Matuta and Fortuna was discovered during construction of government offices in the 1930s.

 

The archaeological site--my current place of work--is under investigation by a joint team from the Sovraintendenza ai Beni Culturali of the Comune di Roma, the Università della Calabria and the University of Michigan.