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She get's an A+ for great social skills. Teething/biting is better. Potty training is going well --fewer and fewer accidents. But daytime crate training proves to be difficult...mainly because she wants to be with us all of the time. Today we tried leaving her in the crate and going outside so she'd be alone in the house. Not good. Puppy class teacher gave me homework on how to make it better.

 

Well, between taking her for her morning hike, taking her out for socialization, and keeping her tethered to me for potty training---putting her in and out of the crate a dozen times a day until she get's comfortable with it just seems daunting. How on earth do people who work full time train their puppies? I'm retired and it eats up my entire day. Not complaining.....just sayin'.

“Caught with my pants down again...”

 

Puppies love to play tug of war, even if it's when you're not ready. Pulling on Mom's pants is a wonderful substitute for that rope toy left in the other room. There's never a moment of peace when there's a cute new puppy dog in the house! Won't you consider making fun and happy memories with Man's Best Friend?

 

Save a life by adopting a homeless pet. Maybe an older dog that is already potty trained may be a better choice for some people? If you’d like to help out dog rescue, this image is available on products at Zazzle and Redbubble.

 

A special "thank you" goes out to AirBeagle and T-florie for their generous contributions to making this picture possible.

 

Echo joined our family today. Keiko and June are shadowing her every move and don't seem to be intimidated by her but Rusty is really unsure and feel he needs to hiss and growl.

 

Potty training is going to be a full time job. She's already had multiple accidents because I wasn't watching her even though she was near me. It's amazing how often puppies have to go.

 

I have got to keep my eyes on her so cannot be on the computer [unless she's kenneled]. My time on Flickr is going to be very limited for awhile. I can see that she's going to be a handful. She's a vocal dog....will whine when she's put in the crate in protest...but will finally give up and go to sleep after a few minutes of shrilled pitched whining.

 

It's the first day away from her mother, littermates and all that is familiar to her.

 

What have we done? It's going to be a very very long six months or year making sure Echo is trained correctly and I'm determined to put the time and energy into it. Even if it means I won't be here much in the meantime. Wish me luck....I'm going to need it.....raising a puppy --esp a cattledog pup will be a major undertaking to do it right.

 

Today [Saturday] Echo has been with us for two weeks. Here's how things are going:

 

1. Potty training : 2 stars. It's a work in progress.

2. Teething: 1 star. I look like a drug junkie from all the puncture wounds up and down my arms.

3. Chasing cats: 3 stars. She has a friendly curiosity about the cats--she just needs to let them come to her instead of vice versa.

4. Crate training: 3 stars. She's great at night. Not so much during the day.

5. Social skills: 10 stars. She's outgoing and friendly towards all strangers.

6. Cuteness: 10 stars. Very photogenic girl.

 

Obsessions:

1. Brooms She goes bonkers over brooms --she wants to attack/ bite it when I'm sweeping so I have to sweep when she's not around.

2. Paper towels [or any rag ]. She goes bonkers over paper towels if she sees me on the floor wiping up a spill. She gets so excited and will snatch the paper towel from my hand and shred it up. I cannot clean the floors when she's around.

 

Well, it's been a very exhausting two weeks. I knew having a new puppy would be work but I guess I've forgotten how much. But for every "challenge" in training her, there's double the good times having this new pup in our lives.

A dog is a man's best friend...

This is Nell, a former breeding dog and puppy mill survivor. The breeder dumped her after the second Caesarian. Not longer "worth" as a breeding dog this guy seemed to be too glad to give her away. Nell is such a sweetheart and one of the nicest pooches I ever had. What a big heart she has and she still trusts humans, curious, fearless and loving everyone around her. She came into my life about two years ago when friends working in a shelter called me they needed an experienced French Bulldog owner. Nell was returned twice before because of behavioural issues. Behavioural issues...aha. Well if these issues refer to Nell doing potty in the house what about some training then? Beside that how was Nell to know she's not allowed of doing this when it didn't matter for 6 years living in a cage? Destroying things? Well, if you leave paper boxes be sure she'll gonna help you tearing them into pieces to better dump them in the trash can. Sneaking onto the couch and acting like it exploded? Have a good laugh and give Nell hugs. Nell not going for a walk? Either carry her outside or leash her and be as stubborn as her. You'll always win ;)

There are endless things I could tell but I can't see any behavioural issues. She's a Frenchie and if owning one you need to know them. Most ppl buy a French Bulldog because they're so cute, don't want to spend much money on them and then are "surprised" what kind of dog they have. Beside that you always have medical issues with this breed. The more ppl want this "fashion" dog the more puppy mills will breed them for fast money the more health issues this breed will have. What a vicious circle. To me as a bulldog lover the only way to get a bulldog (or any dog) is to adopt not shop

9 weeks old. Super busy all the time. Potty & crate training in progress. Both going reasonably well. Her "teething" is going strong.....her razor sharp puppy teeth need to be chomping down on something all the time.

UPDATE: Shelby has found her terrific forever home family!

 

Meet Shelby, available for adoption!

 

She is a sweet, social little Terrier mix born around November 2014. Shelby is spirited, playful and loves other dogs and does very well with children. She is very teachable and sits for her food. She is very affectionate and loving. She loves nothing more than to cuddle with her foster family and fall asleep in their arms. Shelby is doing well with crate and potty training and also sleeps through the night. She currently weighs 15lbs and will weigh around 35lbs full grown.

 

www.carolinapaws.com

www.facebook.com/cpaws1?fref=ts

(Filling in for 12-31-12) Image from the past. This is the last self portrait for this "366 days 2012" project I had a little difficult time keeping up with it during the last months of the year. I used images that I took from the past 2010 & 2011 self portrait projects, to fill in to complete the project. The images I used had never been used before. This project is fun but it did required some time and motivation. I don't know if you know but my family got a new puppy so during the last months I spent time potty training him and helping him get used to us and our home. We're very happy with him, he's a great addition to our family.

I have a new project for 2013, I'll be photographing my family and sometimes I'll do some self portraits too. I don't want to do a 365 days project this time, I'm not sure if I'll post more or less images, we'll have to see how life goes. I thank you so much for checking out my projects :)

 

I wish you all a very prosperous and joyful new year 2013!!

 

(p.s. as I was posting the last images, I found out that a few months back I mess up the numbering of the self portraits :(

it's now corrected.)

 

www.abigailharenberg.com

I am here to drop off old towels and blankets to the no-kill SPCA shelter of Wake County. Animals have been a passion of mine since I was born. I wish I could spend more time here volunteering with these sweet babies, but I would end up taking them all home with me. I know there are ‘designer dog’ trends and cat trends but if you are in the market for a pet please consider checking your local SPCA for an animal. Adopting an older animal is a great way to avoid some of the potty training and teething that you would inevitably endure with a new puppy and they are just as worthy of your time. I also want to mention how important it is to spay and neuter your pets and to leave breading to the professionals. There are plenty of pets in shelters across the United States and there is no reason to add to that number. #spca #raleigh #dogs #cats #adoptyourpets Photo by @korirachel / on Instagram www.instagram.com/p/BDoOvaQjh7N/

Bree is somewhat pleased with the puppy training progress......

 

Happy Weekend!! 😊

Goliath is so cute with his girls

Happy Holidays, everyone! My name is Maci! I am a little girl with a big heart in need of a forever home and someone to love for life. I'm about 4 months, but I only weigh 11 lbs., so I'm not going to be a very big dog when I'm all grown up. I love people and enjoy being close to them and spending time with them. I'm not a fan of being left alone right now. I get along great with other dogs and the cat here in my foster care home. I think big dogs are so cool and I want to be everyone's friend. I am working on potty training and I'm doing really, really well. I learn from the big dogs here, too. I sleep in my crate at night and I'm doing really good in that area as well. I'm a lovable, playful, curious puppy who adores everyone. I do have a more laid back personality than a lot of other pups my age. I'm not real hyper or crazy. I'm just happy and content to have companionship and love. Please give me a chance to become your newest family member! If you have the time and patience to raise a wonderful puppy like me, please apply today! Adoption fee: $100. Fee includes testing, deworming, vaccinations, spay/neuter, 60 days of free pet insurance and microchip. Apply online: www.pawsforliferescue.org.

Our perpetual puppy is gone. “Energizer Bonnie” was active, always on the go until the last week of her life. The day we met her at her breeder’s she was soon tearing around the yard with Bridget, our black standard, having the time of her life just as if they had been bonded buddies for years. I had a small stuffed toy in my hand when she zoomed up behind me, snatched it, and was gone. Bonnie was 7 months old when we first met her, ice white with just a trace of apricot in the ears and she had nice conformation. She demanded attention and always let you know if she wanted something.

 

Bonnie loved life, lived to run, leap, play, bark, and continuously worked at getting into places where she did not belong. She lived for the tease and chase and would still taunt me to come get her right up until her last week. The first week at home with her, I walked into the kitchen to find her standing on the kitchen counter. We have yet to figure out how a 7 month old standard poodle was able to jump on a kitchen counter with cabinets above it. Bonnie figured out how to do it. Those first weeks, she routinely refused to come in with the other poodles and it would take 15 to 20 minutes to get her in since all she wanted to do was play tease and chase. She delighted in tormenting Rusty, our apricot toy, and zooming around the backyard with Bridget. Bonnie dearly loved any kind of stuffed toy and we quickly learned that she would eat the stuffing and chew on the squeaker. We had to put all stuffed toys where she could not get to them and she still managed to get to toys and eat parts several times in her life, once requiring surgery and another time an endoscope to remove a piece. Purses, drawers, and anything else she could open and get into was fair game. This resulted in Bonnie being crated anytime we were away to keep her out of trouble. Fortunately, she loved her crate, but there was one time we came home and found a hole scratched halfway through the sheetrock by her crate. Thankfully she never did it again. Bonnie would never sleep on the bed with us. She would sleep beside the bed on a pad and for years would jump on the bed on Saturday mornings to cuddle with us. If she needed to go out in the early mornings or was ready to eat breakfast on weekends, she would gently scratch the side of the bed to wake me. In later years, when we started feeding her several smaller amounts during the evening, she would come nip us and bark when she knew it was time to eat.

 

I had already been working Bridget in obedience training so I started Bonnie in training as well. She was never enthusiastic about working in obedience, but she dutifully learned to heel somewhat and learned all the other Novice level exercises as well as Rally Obedience. She earned her Companion Dog title in three straight outings and earned Rally Novice, Advanced, and Excellent titles in nine straight outings. Bonnie was halfway through an RAE title when she developed an autoimmune disease and we retired her. She did everything I asked her to do despite not being overly enthused with going into the ring. Bonnie also became a registered therapy dog and we mainly visited nursing homes in San Saba, Texas when we went to my parents’ house for the holidays and other occasions.

 

Unfortunately, Bonnie developed quite a few health issues in her life. She suffered from chronic ear infections due to food allergies which we fixed with a novel protein diet. In 2009, Bonnie developed Immune-mediated Thrombocytopenia (IMT) and began treatment for it. True to form, we did not even realize that Bonnie was ill until we discovered small bruising on her body after brushing her. During the initial treatment, while Bonnie was not as active as usual, I never remember her having any of the usual side effects of immunosuppressive drugs and steroids. She seemed to be mostly unaffected by the drugs. During this time, she also became hypothyroid.She rebounded early 2010, her platelets crashed around Thanksgiving, she was changed to another immunosuppressive drug, and she crashed again Thanksgiving 2011. Her internist recommended surgery to remove her spleen.With a very high probability of success and since Bonnie was young and still in overall good health, we made the decision to put her through the surgery. She came through with flying colors and remained in remission from that time. In mid-2013, she developed irritable bowel disease but once again rebounded after treatment. Bonnie was happy, enjoying life, and seemed to always be able to rebound from any of these serious diseases that she developed.

 

In August 2015, Bonnie bloated the week of her 12th birthday. We rushed her to the ER vet where she was quickly stabilized. At midnight, Bonnie was walking around and alert, but a little agitated. The ER vet and I agreed that she should stay overnight for observation and be given a sedative. At 7 am the next morning, she was groggy, but walking. Bonnie had been given Acepromazine and by the time I got Bonnie to her internist for a followup, she was in hypotension with a heartrate of 200 and blood pressure around 30. She almost died, but her very capable internist once again saved her life. Bonnie made a good, but slow recovery from bloat. We noticed that her rear end weakness that had started earlier in the year had gotten worse. Towards the end of the year, she improved. We had also found out that Bonnie’s pupils were no longer responding to light as they should which left her squinting in bright sunlight.This was due only to old age and nothing could be done.

 

In late February of this year, Bonnie had a flare up of her IBD and was switched from a maintenance dosage of prednisone to a maintenance dosage of budesonide. When we took her in early March for a dental to remove a molar with a cavity, our dental vet found that her liver values were extremely high. After all the medications that Bonnie had successfully tolerated through the years, there was finally one that she could not handle. Her internist reduced the budesonide dosage to once a day and her liver values started coming down. Bonnie was feeling good, eating well, playing and happy, but we could see that her rear end weakness was starting to get more pronounced again.

 

On Friday, April 29th, later in the evening I saw that Bonnie was having much more difficulty walking and did not look well. She saw her vet on Saturday morning and had quite a bit of trouble getting up and walking. The vet found nothing overt except some possible pain in her pelvic area. She was walking with some shakiness the remainder of the day, but was getting around and ate her supper. Sunday morning around 5 am, she woke me attempting to get up. She could not get up and could not initially walk by herself. At noon Sunday, she was not better and we went to the ER vet. She had a slight fever, her blood work was good with her liver values even lower, and a chest x-ray showed nothing of concern. We declined to leave her overnight since there was nothing definite that could be treated. We made a neurological appointment for Monday afternoon and said we would attempt to get an emergency consult earlier in the day. Monday morning, Bonnie was unable to walk or stand by herself. I helped her outside so she could potty and fed her a few bites of canned food with her pills. She was hungry, but the clinic had requested that we not feed her in case the doctor needed her to be fasted for testing. Our vet secured an emergency consult at 11 am. The neurologists found that Bonnie’s ability to walk and stand varied over three different exams and were somewhat baffled. We had an ultrasound done, the results of which were not promising. The lymph nodes in the area of her stomach were enlarged. It was explained to us that this could be due either to complications from IBD or, of course, cancer. We put her on steroids and fluids overnight to see if there was any improvement although the doctor cautioned us that with only two doses of steroid, there would not be much improvement. However, we wanted to give Bonnie a chance since she always had a great will to live and a great capability to rebound. She was alert and wanting to walk. Tuesday morning, there was no improvement and Bonnie actually appeared to be a little worse and she had not eaten overnight. We decided to bring her home and see if she would perk up there and show any signs of improvement. Sherry had previously talked with our dental vet who told us that all of Bonnie’s symptoms pointed to a great probability of cancer, especially since she had so suddenly lost her mobility and had a fever from unknown sources. Our vet echoed that sentiment when he called to give us results of our mini’s wellness blood work exam.

 

Bonnie would not walk when I picked her up at the specialty clinic. After arriving home, I helped her out of the truck and as I was helping her to walk, she headed for the gate into the backyard. She needed to relieve herself but she was not going to do it on the driveway. I supported her as she walked around the backyard until she found the spot she wanted. Inside, I put her on one of the nice, big dog beds in the den and we fed her scrambled eggs, liver treats, some of our regular dog food that she could not normally eat, and even a couple of small pieces of banana nut bread that she loved to try and steal off the counter when Sherry baked it. She attempted to push up on her front legs twice, clearly wanting to get up, but she could not. She would be very alert and responsive to what was going on and then sink onto the dog bed to rest since all this effort exhausted her.

 

Bonnie wanted to live. Bonnie didn’t want to give up. Sherry and I had no illusions about her chances of improving after watching her a short while. I kept repeating over and over in my head that I did not want to end her life as I kept answering that we had no choice, we had to do this. Her life was actively running and playing. She could no longer do those things. Bonnie had been beat down so severely by this illness so quickly. I wanted to save her so very badly. I carried Bonnie to the car and Sherry called our vet to let them know we were on our way. At our vet’s, Bonnie was again very alert with her head up. We fed her more treats and then the nurses took her to place the catheter. When they returned with her, after a few minutes, Bonnie laid over on her side while we talked to her, hugged her, and stroked her body. She was tired, her strength waning. I could tell she was ready to give up the fight. As the injections were administered, I held her muzzle in my hand so she could smell my scent while I stroked her head as she passed quietly and peacefully. This was a day I never wanted to come even as I knew it assuredly would. This was a day I would always pretend was far away in the future. Then the day came far too soon.

 

There will never be another like Bonnie. There will never be another pair like Bridget and Bonnie. They were made to be together. We were so very fortunate to find them separately and bring them both into our home to share so many adventures together with us. I was always amazed how well they meshed and complemented each other.

 

Goodbye my dear girl, we loved you beyond all measure and will miss you even more. Twelve years and eight months were not enough, but it was all we were given.

   

A D O P T E D.

 

After dreaming of this my entire life, and volunteering with various shelters wishing I could take every animal home, I've did done it, and this doggy now has a home.

 

I NEVER planned on adopting a puppy. I was looking for a slightly older dog, but I had some pretty horrible experiences with other shelters and rescue groups. This organization really stood out. They move dogs faster than any other I've encountered (and are now sponsored by Petco as a result of their great efforts!), are responsive, and put their hearts and souls into placing these guys into good homes.

 

He and his littermates were pulled from animal control in Kentucky along with their mom (yet another reason I love this org -- they don't leave the mom to die). They were on the list for euthanasia, but thankfully they were all saved. He has been such a champ so far! He's on some meds for the various shelter ailments, and he happily takes them, even sucking the medicine dropper dry! As far as potty training goes, I'm in awe; if he could hold it, I swear he would be fully-trained already. He has not made one mess (and LOVES the peanut butter treats he gets as a reward for going outside, haha).

 

It's been a sleepless weekend -- I feel like I've just given birth to a child! -- but he's so insanely grateful.

  

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UPDATE: Elsa was adopted! More here: www.facebook.com/cpaws1/photos/a.566047433430692.10737418...

 

I spent some well-needed puppy time yesterday, photographing this sweetie. Elsa is a beagle/golden retriever mix born December 26, 2017. She's a strong-willed, smart and determined little girl, and loves to play. She is doing great with potty training and is up to date on vaccinations. She will be spayed, microchipped, and will weigh between 35-45 lbs full grown.

 

Today was "socializing" day. I took Echo to a sheep herding trial --she was handled and petted by dozens of strangers/ children. And she watched Border collies herd sheep.. Also, our neighbors stopped by to see her and she visited my dad and his dog Annie. She got a heavy dose of socialization.

 

No potty accidents today---i'm taking her outside A LOT to make sure she goes before she get's the urge to go inside.

 

She still squeals in the crate. But slept thru the night --last night.

 

Rusty is giving her the evil eye and keeping his distance. Keiko & June aren't as upset about her.

 

More in comments.

Just when I thought we were making progress on potty training, Echo had two accidents within one hour this afternoon....this after being outside every 15 mins or so....seriously. I never let her out of my sight. A setback ...but that's how it goes.

 

She's teething big time.....her razor sharp teeth likes to grab everything that is in front of her......everything. I have small puncture wounds up and down my right arm. sigh. She has doggy toys scattered around the house in every room but she prefers things like the clothes that I'm wearing, dish towel, paper towels, the coffee table, the swivel chair.

 

She likes to run after the cats. She's on a leash hooked up to me, but she still tries. The cats don't like that. So they give her a wide berth.

 

Oh lord. I've forgotten how much work it is to raise a puppy....esp a cattle dog pup.

 

Also, the pregnant stray cat at my cat colony was a no-show this morning so I was disappointed about that. Emory has cataract surgery tomorrow --and it's hard to watch a trap when I have Echo with me [can't leave her home with Emory until she's potty trained--he's just not quick enough to know when to take her out] so I'll have to put off trapping the cat until later.

 

This was taken at the beach [river] across the street from my cat colony.

A dog is a man's best friend...

This is Nell, a former breeding dog and puppy mill survivor. The breeder dumped her after the second Caesarian. Not longer "worth" as a breeding dog this guy seemed to be too glad to give her away. Nell is such a sweetheart and one of the nicest pooches I ever had. What a big heart she has and she still trusts humans, curious, fearless and loving everyone around her. She came into my life about two years ago when friends working in a shelter called me they needed an experienced French Bulldog owner. Nell was returned twice before because of behavioural issues. Behavioural issues...aha. Well if these issues refer to Nell doing potty in the house what about some training then? Beside that how was Nell to know she's not allowed of doing this when it didn't matter for 6 years living in a cage? Destroying things? Well, if you leave paper boxes be sure she'll gonna help you tearing them into pieces to better dump them in the trash can. Sneaking onto the couch and acting like it exploded? Have a good laugh and give Nell hugs. Nell not going for a walk? Either carry her outside or leash her and be as stubborn as her. You'll always win ;)

There are endless things I could tell but I can't see any behavioural issues. She's a Frenchie and if owning one you need to know them. Most ppl buy a French Bulldog because they're so cute, don't want to spend much money on them and then are "surprised" what kind of dog they have. Beside that you always have medical issues with this breed. The more ppl want this "fashion" dog the more puppy mills will breed them for fast money the more health issues this breed will have. What a vicious circle. To me as a bulldog lover the only way to get a bulldog (or any dog) is to adopt not shop

The apples are getting big and the ones that drop off Penny is enjoying! lol...almost the weekend...yay! We're getting a new puppy this weekend. Sam wants a male ....my gosh..how will we ever be able to go anywhere with 3 dogs!!!!!!!!!!? I'm not very happy...puppies are a lot of work...potty training..augh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Am potty training our new puppy, a miniature schnauzer so there are frequent trips outside which he has confused with playtime. Here he decides to climb up a planter of pansies and of course, has to taste them. I'm like a new mommy again. This is best viewed on black.

 

Thanks for stopping by. Fair warning, as with most "new" parents, I will be posting too many pix of him in the days and months ahead! lol

A dog is a man's best friend...

This is Nell, a former breeding dog and puppy mill survivor. The breeder dumped her after the second Caesarian. Not longer "worth" as a breeding dog this guy seemed to be too glad to give her away. Nell is such a sweetheart and one of the nicest pooches I ever had. What a big heart she has and she still trusts humans, curious, fearless and loving everyone around her. She came into my life about two years ago when friends working in a shelter called me they needed an experienced French Bulldog owner. Nell was returned twice before because of behavioural issues. Behavioural issues...aha. Well if these issues refer to Nell doing potty in the house what about some training then? Beside that how was Nell to know she's not allowed of doing this when it didn't matter for 6 years living in a cage? Destroying things? Well, if you leave paper boxes be sure she'll gonna help you tearing them into pieces to better dump them in the trash can. Sneaking onto the couch and acting like it exploded? Have a good laugh and give Nell hugs. Nell not going for a walk? Either carry her outside or leash her and be as stubborn as her. You'll always win ;)

There are endless things I could tell but I can't see any behavioural issues. She's a Frenchie and if owning one you need to know them. Most ppl buy a French Bulldog because they're so cute, don't want to spend much money on them and then are "surprised" what kind of dog they have. Beside that you always have medical issues with this breed. The more ppl want this "fashion" dog the more puppy mills will breed them for fast money the more health issues this breed will have. What a vicious circle. To me as a bulldog lover the only way to get a bulldog (or any dog) is to adopt not shop

At my mom's, since Milo is still in the potty-training process, we've had to make impromptu barricades to keep him in the kitchen. While Pippin can rather easily spring over the card table here, Milo tries to use his sheer body force to bust through it.. he's been able to twice now, lol.

I need to make some puppy photos for a book about, you guessed it, puppies. This is one for the "potty training" part.

"But its raining," she said as she produced the saddest face she could to melt my heart to let her back in the house.

 

The perils of potty training!

Talk about a good snow puppy! He loves the snow and has braving all these snow storms since the second week of December! Potty training has been going smoothly outside, he has been such a good boy!

A dog is a man's best friend...

This is Nell, a former breeding dog and puppy mill survivor. The breeder dumped her after the second Caesarian. Not longer "worth" as a breeding dog this guy seemed to be too glad to give her away. Nell is such a sweetheart and one of the nicest pooches I ever had. What a big heart she has and she still trusts humans, curious, fearless and loving everyone around her. She came into my life about two years ago when friends working in a shelter called me they needed an experienced French Bulldog owner. Nell was returned twice before because of behavioural issues. Behavioural issues...aha. Well if these issues refer to Nell doing potty in the house what about some training then? Beside that how was Nell to know she's not allowed of doing this when it didn't matter for 6 years living in a cage? Destroying things? Well, if you leave paper boxes be sure she'll gonna help you tearing them into pieces to better dump them in the trash can. Sneaking onto the couch and acting like it exploded? Have a good laugh and give Nell hugs. Nell not going for a walk? Either carry her outside or leash her and be as stubborn as her. You'll always win ;)

There are endless things I could tell but I can't see any behavioural issues. She's a Frenchie and if owning one you need to know them. Most ppl buy a French Bulldog because they're so cute, don't want to spend much money on them and then are "surprised" what kind of dog they have. Beside that you always have medical issues with this breed. The more ppl want this "fashion" dog the more puppy mills will breed them for fast money the more health issues this breed will have. What a vicious circle. To me as a bulldog lover the only way to get a bulldog (or any dog) is to adopt not shop

I guess it is official now... I gotta take a break from Flickr for a wee bit longer... =(

 

I was already pretty busy before, but 4 weeks ago I added more "duties" into my life by buying a little 8 week old puppy.. she is now getting used to her new home and routines, nevertheless she still requires a lot of attention, especially in the chewing and potty training department... so, until the training is done, i'm afraid i won't be able to spend time much time on Flickr at all...

 

I will visit your stream when i can... until then, take care!!...

 

will miss you all and your sometimes cheeky comments... hehe...

 

XOXOXO... =)

School days for kids and puppies as Echo attends her first puppy class tonight. Not sure if they'll allow owner to take pics....I'll probably just carry my point & shoot to be discreet and snap a few pics if allowed. It will be interesting to see how Echo does around other puppies. The first of many months of classes for her.

 

Trees are rapidly turning colors--it looks a lot like Fall these days.

 

Dog Days Training facility. www.dogdaysnw.com/

A dog is a man's best friend...

This is Nell, a former breeding dog and puppy mill survivor. The breeder dumped her after the second Caesarian. Not longer "worth" as a breeding dog this guy seemed to be too glad to give her away. Nell is such a sweetheart and one of the nicest pooches I ever had. What a big heart she has and she still trusts humans, curious, fearless and loving everyone around her. She came into my life about two years ago when friends working in a shelter called me they needed an experienced French Bulldog owner. Nell was returned twice before because of behavioural issues. Behavioural issues...aha. Well if these issues refer to Nell doing potty in the house what about some training then? Beside that how was Nell to know she's not allowed of doing this when it didn't matter for 6 years living in a cage? Destroying things? Well, if you leave paper boxes be sure she'll gonna help you tearing them into pieces to better dump them in the trash can. Sneaking onto the couch and acting like it exploded? Have a good laugh and give Nell hugs. Nell not going for a walk? Either carry her outside or leash her and be as stubborn as her. You'll always win ;)

There are endless things I could tell but I can't see any behavioural issues. She's a Frenchie and if owning one you need to know them. Most ppl buy a French Bulldog because they're so cute, don't want to spend much money on them and then are "surprised" what kind of dog they have. Beside that you always have medical issues with this breed. The more ppl want this "fashion" dog the more puppy mills will breed them for fast money the more health issues this breed will have. What a vicious circle. To me as a bulldog lover the only way to get a bulldog (or any dog) is to adopt not shop

t is not a fan of tethering.

 

by the way, i love having an actual need for my wellies :) the part of the lawn we're standing in is always damp (except at the height of summer), because it's shaded by the tree just out of frame. it's usually muddy and wet, and T hates walking in the wet grass. i sprayed a lot of puppy potty training stuff in the sunny part of the lawn, and they were both drawn to it immediately.

 

the goal is to not just get them to stop going in the house, but to stop going on the concrete. there, it just dries up and smells and even though i hose it off nearly every day, the stains don't come out.

 

my gosh these two little dogs are the most work i've ever had!

 

large!

We hosted a teen sleepover again this year for New Year's Eve, which I think is launching me into 2017 with a tad bit of insomnia, especially after a stretch of a few late nights with potty-training puppy, Pax. But it was nice to hang out with a few fellow homeschooling moms and contemplate the New Year ahead!

We hosted a teen sleepover again this year for New Year's Eve, which I think is launching me into 2017 with a tad bit of insomnia, especially after a stretch of a few late nights with potty-training puppy, Pax. But it was nice to hang out with a few fellow homeschooling moms and contemplate the New Year ahead!

a friend said the Lennies follow me around because I love them so... I have been thiinking about a new puppy, but this one might eat less! Hmmm... wonder about potty training? any ideas on how to potty train a cloud?

 

Many of you already know my stories about my folks and how they taught me to love nature (Mom always noticed things like this cloud) but if you want a taste more you can read a blog post over here with a short story wp.me/p23Ni1-h2

  

©Darlisa Black

  

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Please do not use any of my photos without my permission.

 

You can see my blog here with links in the sidebar to all my sites for photography

starlisa.net particularly check out the PRODUCTS links at the top of the page for my calendars and books, or CURRENT EVENTS to see what local Fairs I will be doing with my photography.

  

and my daughter is working on recording her second album now... you can hear her first one here music.leannansidhe.com/album/fragile-dreams

 

Small Business Saturday coming up soon! Remember folks like us for Christmas Presents

 

HAPPY THANKSGIVING EVERYONE! I am thankful to be alive here another day... thankful for family love, for the beauty of Nature, for the gift of a camera that allows me to share that beauty!

There is not a list of reasons long enough to accurately summarise the need for dog potty training. It’s easier, it’s cleaner, it helps in forming a routine… the list could go on.

  

A dog eats at least twice a day, and because the animal is so full of

vigour and activity, it is ...

 

petsutra.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/PetSutra-Dog-Pott...

 

petsutra.com/dog-potty-training-psychology/

Ricky : "Mom. Weenie's not going potty. He starts to go, and then a car drives by and he stops! He tries again, and he hears a bird and he stops!"

Me : "Training a puppy takes time, Ricky."

Ricky : "We have been out here for hours and hours!!"

Me : "It's been five minutes..."

Ricky : "Really??"

Me : "Really.."

Ricky : "Maybe we can put one of those cone things on his head so he doesn't get distracted??"

Me : "Uh.. no."

Ricky : "Ugh. Weenie, stop looking at me with those puppy dog eyes and do some poops!!"

Not really though, we have to full grown puppies that drive me nuts as it is!

 

To bad you can't "freeze" them at a certain age, after potty training but before they develop a sense of independence and "make me" attitude!

  

Just another outing with Pax on the potty-training journey.

How can I toilet train my puppy/dog?

To make the process of toilet training successful and as efficient as possible, you need to use reward-based positive reinforcement training. The first step is to give your dog plenty of opportunities to go outside. The second is to reward the dog every time (or as often as possible) they toilet in the place where you want the dog to go.

The reward must occur immediately after the event (within a few seconds), not when the dog comes back inside, as the dog will not make an association between going to the toilet in the right spot and the reward unless it is given straight afterwards. The reward can be in the form of praise (a pat on the chest or saying 'good' dog in a pleasant tone of voice), offering a food treat or giving the dog their favourite chew toy.

This system relies on you supervising the dog as much as possible throughout the day so as not to miss the opportunity to reward the dog for the good behaviour. The more often you can do this, the faster the dog will learn. You should also look out for signs showing the dog is about to go to the toilet so you can take them outside and are ready to reward them as soon as they have finished. When dogs are about to go to the toilet they tend to sniff the area, circle and then pause in the spot (though individuals may vary so owners may watch their dog to get an idea of what they do).

Remember to take your puppy or dog to the toilet area first thing in the morning, as dogs will often need to go to the toilet at this time. Take them to the toilet area frequently.

Positive reinforcement also involves ignoring 'unwanted' toileting – i.e. if the dog goes to the toilet in the wrong place it is best to display no reaction. You should clean the area thoroughly with a non-ammonia based cleaning product (these can be found at your local veterinary clinic or animal supplies store) to take away the scent and reduce the likelihood of the dog using the same place again next time.

Old-fashioned responses such as 'rubbing the dog’s nose in it' or administering any form of punishment will not teach the dog anything, in fact it may actually delay the learning process. The dog may instead learn that toileting in front of the owner is inappropriate and this then makes rewarding toileting (when they do go in the right spot) difficult.

It is very important to note that young puppies often do not have full control over their urination until they are a bit older. That is, urination is a developmental process, so very young puppies can make a toileting mistake without being able to prevent or control it.

 

kb.rspca.org.au/How-can-I-toilet-train-my-puppydog_296.html

There are numerous reasons to train your dog. Perhaps it was that irresistible puppy or the dog with lovable eyes! Regardless of your situation, you need to teach your dog how to be obedient. You need to make sure you train them well. Here in this article, you'll find some great ideas to help.

 

Training is an ongoing process - your dog needs to be constantly reminded of the rules! Often, owners get the feeling that they do not need to continue working with the dog once it is trained. Don't allow your dog to get out of the habit of good behavior. This is why on-going training is important.

 

As you train dogs, it is necessary to utilize a consistent tone and volume when giving commands. They will know this tone of your voice and associate it with being in trouble. It also allows your dog to realize the differences in each command.

 

Make sure food and outside time are scheduled to help break your dog into being an inside dog. This way, you are aware of when your dog will need to do his business, and you can take him outside before an accident occurs. A regular schedule will also give your dog a chance to learn how to exercise self-control, as he will know that a trip outside is eminent.

 

Remember to exercise patience whenever training your dog. This prevents both of you from getting irritated and angry with the training. Understand that your dog actually wants to please you, however he/she can be confused with what it is you want them to do.

 

Make training with your dog fun. If you do so, your dog will feel closer to you, and even respond to training better. Training can be a fun experience, however, getting some enjoyment for yourself and the dog through play is a good thing.

 

Make sure training periods are short in duration. Your pet probably lacks a generous attention span, making it more likely that he will thrive on brief training sessions. You can choose to adopt a more intensive regimen, but only if you are willing to allow your dog a few moments of relaxation and play to break up the session.

 

Always get your dog's attention the same way. Try to use the dog's name in the start of the command. Give a simple command after beginning with the dog's name. A dog will immediately respond to their name. After grabbing their attention, they will be prepared for their instructions.

 

Avoid letting your dog have accidents when potty training. Watch for signals that your dog has to go out to relieve himself. Pacing back and forth, snuffing and whining are some common signs. When you notice this, do not delay. Put your dog on a leash and take him where he should go. Reward the dog for using the bathroom outdoors. Eventually, he will learn to ask to go out.

 

Training needs to continue during the dog's life. Just because your dog isn't a puppy, it doesn't meant his learning stops. If you provide positive reinforcement for desirable behaviors, your dog will continue to be obedient, and when you provide your dog with consistent discipline, negative behaviors are less likely to occur.

 

As soon as you get your puppy, the first thing to teach him/her is their name; this will help build a bond between animal and human. Use their name often, and then teach them how to come to you when called. His name should be the first word he learns. It's important that the time spent with your puppy is quality time. Spend your time playing with your puppy. This way he will get to know you quicker and will begin to trust you faster. When you set this trust early on, the puppy will be more open to the next steps in training.

 

When training a dog to a leash it is important to keep the leash loose. When you take your dog out for a walk, he will want to explore. Because of their eagerness; they tend to strain on the limits of a leash. The smart owner will deter this behavior by having his pet walk without tension on the leash.

 

Dogs will be dogs, so give your dog outlets to work out his canine behaviors. Any dog requires a healthy diet, room to move about freely and constant stimulation.

 

So are you prepared to get started now? With any luck, the tips in this piece have provided you with great ideas for dog training. Few things are more gratifying than a healthy relationship with your trained pet. But, you have to apply yourself. It will be well worth it at the end of your training when you have your dream dog. Use the tips that you like the most, and enjoy a better-behaved dog. mypetfriends.biz

In the randomness of life's ebb and flow, we never considered that our very first standard poodle would be our very best. After having had toys and a rescue mini after we were married, I told Sherry that I really wanted to get a standard and we decided that we would look for an older puppy or young adult. Sherry found a breeder that had both older standard puppies and a one year old standard. We drove over and met Bridget along with her sire and dam. She was a gorgeous black, full of life and happiness. The breeder, who ran a doggie day care and pet sitting service, told us Bridget split her time between the house and the kennel. We talked with her until almost dark, discussing Bridget, viewing her older puppies, and finally deciding to take Bridget home with us. Bridget's breeder had already sent in her registration papers, registering her as Whelan's Bridget Monet. We decided to keep her call name the same as her registered name since she was already familiar with it.

 

By the time we left, it was too late for us to pick up a crate. Having only toys and a mini, we had no crates that Bridget would fit in. The next day was Sunday and we would be gone for worship most of the morning. We were not completely thrilled with leaving Bridget in a new surrounding without crating her, but we decided to take a chance and leave her out in the house. When we returned, Bridget had peed on the floor in one spot and bent the den mini blinds in one place. That was the only time Bridget ever pottied in the house until she had major surgery many years later. She immediately adjusted to our house and was completely at ease with our two toy poodles and our mini. While we had trained our toys to sit and a few other commands, we had never formally had them in training classes. We decided it would be a good idea to take some formal classes with Bridget considering her larger size. Fortunately, Sherry had met a young woman who was a trainer at the nearby Petsmart and who had some background in obedience. We took two classes with her and Bridget was a quick study leaning sit, stay, down, and numerous other commands. The trainer encouraged us to continue training with Bridget and we were lucky enough to find a dog training club only about 20 minutes from our house. Thus began Bridget's obedience career.

 

One of the many reasons Bridget holds such a special place in my heart is that she was my Novice A dog. We learned together and benefitted from numerous experienced obedience handlers at our club. We got our feet wet getting a CGC and continued training for Novice obedience for the next year. Our first time in the ring was a disaster, but we persevered and with the guidance of one of the club's very experienced trainers, Bridget earned her CD in three straight outings. We continued on with Open and there Bridget found her true love in obedience: jumping and retrieving. Bridget was not what I would call an instinctive retriever who would automatically pick up items when she went outside or bring items back to me. However, once she figured out what I wanted her to do with a dumbbell, she loved it. She wasn't too keen on heeling, but tolerated it. I had also started Bridget in rally obedience as we were finishing up her CD and with only a few nights practice, we took first place for both of our first two legs in Rally Novice. One of my many fond memories of rally is Bridget waving her front paws as she dropped when we had to execute the moving down on the rally course. However, we were less successful in Open. We got two legs quickly and then took forever to get that last leg as Bridget would either go down on the long set or ignore the drop on recall. Having earned her Rally Excellent title, we were also going after the RAE title and through the months of going to shows to get that last CDX leg and her 10 legs for the RAE, I could tell that her interest in obedience was starting to wane. We trained in Utility for a few months and she liked the scent articles, but her heart just was not in it anymore. I could tell she was either bored or not interested. I really wanted to get a UD with her, but I was not going to push her or force her to train when she was not happy training. Up until her last year, Bridget was always thrilled when I got out her dumbbell. She would happily retrieve it across the den and bring it back to me. When I gave her the release command, she would jump up in the air like she always did during practice sessions and race to the kitchen for a treat. Years later I happened to run across an AKC publication that had Bridget ranked the #9 poodle in AKC rally placements for 2006.

 

Bridget's most endearing trait was this perfect combination of temperament and personality. She never met a stranger, she was so expressive, she was very interactive with people, and she was stable and predictable in all situations. She was never destructive, always happy to crate up, and up until the end of her life never soiled the house unless she was very ill. She never so much as indicated any intention to bite or have other adverse reactions to people. I remember a gathering at our house not too long after she came to live with us where the adult daughter of one of our friends accidentally stepped on Bridget's tail. She jumped up and looked at the friend's daughter with an expression that said "Why did you do that?" She never showed any aggressive actions toward our other poodles and was very gentle with our toys and minis. The only time she ever growled at them was if they attempted to interrupt her when she was drinking or eating and it was a low warning growl. She was quite the talker and had this very plaintive bark that indicated when she was wanting something or when one of the other poodles had wronged her. With her facial expressions, I almost expected her to start talking at times. She was very emotionally tuned into us and seemed to just intuitively know what we were thinking. When both Sherry and I had major surgeries, she would not leave our side and either slept beside us or on the bed with us.

 

However, as do many standards, Bridget had an independent mind and she could be stubborn when she decided she did not want to do something. And she could be sneaky about it with a sense of humor. I had constructed a bar jump to use at home to practice jumping with Bridget. We were practicing one afternoon and I had sent her over the jump a few times. We set up for another jump and when I commanded her to jump, she took off toward the jump, veered off, and ran toward the house instead. The practice session was over as far as she was concerned. Her one shortcoming was that she hated German Shepherds for some reason. She never actually tried to aggressively attack or bite them, but would fly at them in a rage to warm them off.

 

Bridget had a fairly high prey drive and would chase squirrels and lizards all day if we let her. She wouldn't sit straight in the obedience ring, but I have seen her more than once in a perfect sit for at least 30 minutes at a time watching for squirrels. Bonnie became very annoyed with her after Bridget decided that she preferred watching for squirrels rather than playing all the time in the backyard. Bridget never managed to catch one, but did kill a large black rat and bring it into the house one evening.

 

Bridget also introduced us to the world of standard poodle burps. Our toys and minis never did this and we were quite taken aback the first time she let out one of those big burps. She was quite the burper, more so than Bonnie was and now Brodie.

 

Bridget enjoyed good health and she had no significant illnesses as she aged. Then on September 11, 2011 when Bridget was 9, she suffered a stroke. As we initially struggled to understand what was going on, taking her to our internist and a neurologist, her symptoms worsened. Since Bridget was in good health and was still young, we had the neurologist run a MRI and a spinal tap. The results showed a lesion on the right thalamus with associated bleeding. By the time the MRI was done, the bleeding had stopped, but Bridget's recovery was far from certain. However, the prognosis was good since there were no tumors or cancer associated with the lesion and Bridget was in good health. Supportive care was all the neurologist could offer and the rest was up to Bridget. She remained stable for several days, but did not show any real improvement until the end of the week. After we brought her home, she regained almost all of her normal capabilities within 6 weeks except for a slight dragging of her left foot and some slight stability issues. She was happy and healthy again and enjoying life. In November of 2013, Bridget woke up in pain when she attempted to get up one morning and we rushed her to the ER vet. We were devastated to find that she had a large tumor on or near her spleen. The issue was complicated since the neurologist had told us that, as a stroke survivor, Bridget would be more susceptible to complications when put under anesthesia and we should not do so unless we had no choice. Fearing the worse since we knew hemangiosarcoma was a very great likelihood, we made the choice to risk major surgery since Bridget was still in overall good health and still young at 11 years. We were once again blessed as the tumor was a benign hematoma and Bridget survived the surgery with no major complications. However, she had a long recovery and the residual issues from her stroke were more pronounced, especially with her fine motor skills. Despite these issues, Bridget remained happy and active and still played occasionally with Bonnie and Brodie.

 

As Bridget continued to age, she had her good and some not as good days. Her liver values had started to climb, but no indications of liver disease was ever found and she showed no other symptoms. She had to have two teeth extracted at the end of 2015, the first two teeth she had ever lost, and came through the procedure with flying colors and had no complications. After we lost Bonnie in May 2016, Bridget slowly began to get more frail and wobbly at times. She collapsed twice near the end of the year, but our vet found nothing significant and she was quickly back to her normal self each time. As the first of the year rolled around, she began to have less of an appetite and wondered if she would make her 15th birthday. At her yearly checkup in March of this year, her kidney values were above normal and she was diagnosed in early kidney failure. The months of April and May were very tedious for us as we tried to find anything that Bridget would eat for any length of time. We were happy to be able to celebrate her 15th birthday on May 1st and Bridget, while still not eating well, was still happy and had her short periods of sprinting in the backyard. In early June, we discovered that she had a nasty UTI and began an antibiotic. She did not respond well so after a few days, we had our vet give her IV fluids for three days. This helped a little, but she still was not completely well. A follow up two weeks later showed the UTI was still not cleared up so we had it cultured and found the correct antibiotic. At the end of the week, Bridget was visibly better and starting eating real dog food again. She was improving daily and was more active and energetic than she had been for the past month. We were thrilled that Bridget had made good progress and were looking forward to having her checked again at the end of the month to make sure the UTI was gone.

 

Bridget, what happened that early afternoon of July 13th? I wish I knew. You were normal that morning, ate well, and when Sherry left around noon, you ate a few treats along with the other poodles as you and the other poodles went into the bedroom. When I came home at 3:30, you had vomited bile in the bedroom and I could tell you were not feeling well. You refused to eat and about 30 minutes later, you threw up bile again two times. I was able to get you to the vet for an exam, blood draw, and a cerenia injection. You were not feeling well all evening, panting, and when I left for work Friday morning, the look in your eyes told me you were not better. The blood work results came back around 10 am on Friday and showed nothing. The vet said kidney values were actually better than last time. I left work and took you back to the vet for x-rays. The x-rays showed nothing. Yet, you were not well, your breathing was strange, and when I held you, I could feel you trembling as you breathed. You had little energy. Our vets were stumped, there was no diagnosis, and therefore, nothing that could be treated. Supportive care such as IVs were offered, but neither our vet nor Sherry and I thought that would actually help. I don't know if you had suffered some type of neurological incident or your body had just finally worn out from old age and the effects of the UTI.

 

After seeing the look in Bridget's eyes earlier that morning and observing her at the vet's, I had already come to the conclusion that this was very likely the day our journey with Bridget would end. Our vet confirmed to us that, in his opinion, she currently had no quality of life. He had previously been very optimistic about her chances when we gave her the IV fluids and started treating the UTI so I know he was as stunned as we were about what was happening. Sherry and I made the decision along with our vet and I went out to the car to get the pad that our poodles always travel on. We laid Bridget on the pad on the exam table and spent our last remaining minutes with her before we told the vet we were ready. She knew we were there but was not responding in her usual ways. I hate doing this. It never gets any easier. It has to be done if we are to think of her needs first and put her best interests above our own. Bridget passed peacefully at 1:13 pm on July 14, 2017. The journey had ended at 15 years, 2 months, and 13 days.

 

While Sherry and I knew that Bridget's time with us was limited after the diagnosis of kidney failure in March, we did not take any of the remaining days with her for granted. However, as it often does, the final day came very quickly and unexpectedly. Bridget lived a long and happy life and I am thankful that we were able to enjoy the long journey with her. She and Bonnie came into our lives at just the right time and those years were some of the happiest of my marriage and my life. We could not have asked for a better introduction to the variety when we took her home in June of 2003. As far as I am concerned, we took home the perfect standard poodle that day and we will be hard pressed to find another standard with her combination of temperament, personality, and intuitiveness. The empty recliner, "her" chair, is daily a stark reminder that she is gone. I'm sad the journey is done, but what a journey it was. It was a journey that far exceeded what I thought life with a standard poodle would be.

  

Just another outing with Pax on the potty-training journey.

I've come to cherish these moments of rest!!! Wow...this little guy is go, go and go!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I'm exhausted! No more puppies!!!! Puppies are for the young!!! Working on the potty training...that alone is exhausting as I have to be watching him all the time! Penny was a joy and so easy to potty train...this one is stubborn...makes things much more dramatic!!! lol...augh! Have a wonderful new week everyone! :) I've had this fuzzy blanket since last Christmas...look how his colors match!!!! lol

Just another outing with Pax on the potty-training journey.

I'm back.

It was a tough week folks, and I'm still feeling all sorts of disoriented and sad without my "black shadow" around, but I'm starting to catch my breath again.

Raven was an integral part of this household, I almost feel like I've lost a physical part of me.

 

But it's time to push forward........if you haven't heard, Christmas is less than a month away!

I have trees to trim and halls to deck! I've already hauled out the first box of decorations!

 

AND......I have a new puppy on the way!

My guess is that it's going to be a pretty lively holiday season here at Cat Hill Farm.

8 cats, one 10 week old puppy, a 3 year old granddaughter, decorations, a Christmas tree and presents!

What could possibly happen?

 

slowly trying to catch up with everyone here on Flickr

. I'm trying to rush around and get all of my shopping out of the way now , and a few other seasonal errands accomplsihed. I want to get them out of the way in the next week.

When Pearl gets here, I don't want to spend long periods of time away from the house..... puppy potty training and all.

 

time to get my "jolly on"!

  

Moon is looking less and less like a puppy every day. The potty training is going well, and he's starting to walk on a leash. Yesterday he went for a short boat ride with me and hubby on hubby's boat. He ate a few small periwinkle shells, and kept biting hubby's diving flag, but otherwise he was very good.

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