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He sees me, and at once, swift as a bird,

Ascends the neighbouring beech; there whisks his brush,

And perks his ears, and stamps and scolds aloud,

With all the prettiness of feign'd alarm,

And anger insignificantly fierce.

 

While its parents and siblings were scolding me from deep in the brush pile where I came upon the family, this young one popped up on an open snag close to me. Not a good strategy when there is an intruder in the area, but it gave me a nice chance for a photo.

 

St. Albert, Alberta.

The squirrel, flippant, pert, and full of play.

He sees me, and at once, swift as a bird,

Ascends the neighbouring beech; there whisks his brush,

And perks his ears, and stamps and scolds aloud,

With all the prettiness of feign'd alarm,

And anger insignificantly fierce.

Many thanks for your visits, faves and comments. Cheers.

 

Sacred Kingfisher

Scientific Name: Todiramphus sanctus

Description: The Sacred Kingfisher is a medium sized kingfisher. It has a turquoise back, turquoise blue rump and tail, buff-white underparts and a broad cream collar. There is a broad black eye stripe extending from bill to nape of neck. Both sexes are similar, although the female is generally lighter with duller upper parts. Young birds are similar to the female, but have varying amounts of rusty-brown edging to feathers on the collar and underparts, and buff edges on the wing coverts.

Distribution: The Sacred Kingfisher is common and familiar throughout the coastal regions of mainland Australia and less common throughout Tasmania. The species is also found on islands from Australasia to Indonesia and New Zealand.

Habitat: The Sacred Kingfisher inhabits woodlands, mangroves and paperbark forests, tall open eucalypt forest and melaleuca forest.

Seasonal movements: In Australia, Sacred Kingfishers spend the winter in the north of their range and return south in the spring to breed.

Feeding: Sacred Kingfishers forage mainly on the land, only occasionally capturing prey in the water. They feed on crustaceans, reptiles, insects and their larvae and, infrequently, fish. The birds perch on low exposed branch on the lookout for prey. Once prey is located, the Sacred Kingfisher swoops down and grasps it in its bill, returning to the perch to eat it.

Breeding: For most of the year Sacred Kingfishers are mainly solitary, pairing only for the breeding season. Usually two clutches are laid in a season. Both sexes excavate the nest, which is normally a burrow in a termite mound, hollow branch or river bank. The nest chamber is unlined and can be up to 20m above the ground. Both sexes also incubate the eggs and care for the young.

Calls: The voice of the Sacred Kingfisher is a loud "ek ek ek ek" repeated continuously throughout breeding season. Birds also give a "kee kee kee" in excitement and a series of chirring, scolding notes when alarmed.

Minimum Size: 19cm

Maximum Size: 24cm

Average size: 21cm

Average weight: 45g

Breeding season: September to December; occasionally extended to March, if conditions are favourable.

Clutch Size: 3 to 6

Incubation: 18 days

Nestling Period: 26 days

(Sources: www.birdsinbackyards.net and "The Slater Field Guide to Australian Birds - Second Edition")

__________________________________________

 

© Chris Burns 2021

 

All rights reserved.

 

This image may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying and recording without my written consent.

During a short bike ride this morning, i ran into a very long line of people - those who were willing to be vaccinated, the ones in front of you

Vaccine bus - which could be seen in the distance - on her shot.

Great-I thought-a refresher can't hurt you and lined up

me with one.

Then an older woman fell past me from behind, on a younger one,

southern looking couple and started scolding them-like

they could dare to get vaccinated, whatever

Now it's the turn of the older ones. Of course, the couple resisted

and bad words came up. Before I could interfere,

others did that, bystanders, but it took

a while until the situation was de-escalated.

When I then heard that there were only 80 vaccine doses, but around

500 people standing around in the cold at - 4 degrees, i knew where

the blame was to be found.

 

Anyway, I grabbed my bicycle, drove home again

and have make this picture,--unboostered :-)

 

I am not an opponent of vaccination, even i come from Stuttgart,

(most recently also the capital of

Lateral ( Quer) thinker :-)) and i think I'll wait until the

Waves of panic have subsided, -convinced that I'm mine

Life can neither add an hour nor take away an hour.

 

( Picture: Cairns,Australia )

 

Xavier Rudd - We Deserve To Dream

www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2dkp2jMWRU

 

Stoney Creek-X.Rudd

a Capella

www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQzT8oOmyg0

   

At the rear of the Old Weavers House is a medieval ducking stool, jutting out over the river. This ducking stool was historically used as a method of punishing 'scolds' - women accused by their husbands of talking back too much! The stool may also have been used as a more severe punishment for suspected witches.

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. R_3268

Many thanks for your visits, faves and comments. Cheers.

 

Sacred Kingfisher

Scientific Name: Todiramphus sanctus

Description: The Sacred Kingfisher is a medium sized kingfisher. It has a turquoise back, turquoise blue rump and tail, buff-white underparts and a broad cream collar. There is a broad black eye stripe extending from bill to nape of neck. Both sexes are similar, although the female is generally lighter with duller upper parts. Young birds are similar to the female, but have varying amounts of rusty-brown edging to feathers on the collar and underparts, and buff edges on the wing coverts.

Distribution: The Sacred Kingfisher is common and familiar throughout the coastal regions of mainland Australia and less common throughout Tasmania. The species is also found on islands from Australasia to Indonesia and New Zealand.

Habitat: The Sacred Kingfisher inhabits woodlands, mangroves and paperbark forests, tall open eucalypt forest and melaleuca forest.

Seasonal movements: In Australia, Sacred Kingfishers spend the winter in the north of their range and return south in the spring to breed.

Feeding: Sacred Kingfishers forage mainly on the land, only occasionally capturing prey in the water. They feed on crustaceans, reptiles, insects and their larvae and, infrequently, fish. The birds perch on low exposed branch on the lookout for prey. Once prey is located, the Sacred Kingfisher swoops down and grasps it in its bill, returning to the perch to eat it.

Breeding: For most of the year Sacred Kingfishers are mainly solitary, pairing only for the breeding season. Usually two clutches are laid in a season. Both sexes excavate the nest, which is normally a burrow in a termite mound, hollow branch or river bank. The nest chamber is unlined and can be up to 20m above the ground. Both sexes also incubate the eggs and care for the young.

Calls: The voice of the Sacred Kingfisher is a loud "ek ek ek ek" repeated continuously throughout breeding season. Birds also give a "kee kee kee" in excitement and a series of chirring, scolding notes when alarmed.

Minimum Size: 19cm

Maximum Size: 24cm

Average size: 21cm

Average weight: 45g

Breeding season: September to December; occasionally extended to March, if conditions are favourable.

Clutch Size: 3 to 6

Incubation: 18 days

Nestling Period: 26 days

(Sources: www.birdsinbackyards.net and "The Slater Field Guide to Australian Birds - Second Edition")

__________________________________________

 

© Chris Burns 2021

 

All rights reserved.

 

This image may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying and recording without my written consent.

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. R_564

Many thanks for your visits, faves and comments. Cheers.

 

Sacred Kingfisher

Scientific Name: Todiramphus sanctus

Description: The Sacred Kingfisher is a medium sized kingfisher. It has a turquoise back, turquoise blue rump and tail, buff-white underparts and a broad cream collar. There is a broad black eye stripe extending from bill to nape of neck. Both sexes are similar, although the female is generally lighter with duller upper parts. Young birds are similar to the female, but have varying amounts of rusty-brown edging to feathers on the collar and underparts, and buff edges on the wing coverts.

Distribution: The Sacred Kingfisher is common and familiar throughout the coastal regions of mainland Australia and less common throughout Tasmania. The species is also found on islands from Australasia to Indonesia and New Zealand.

Habitat: The Sacred Kingfisher inhabits woodlands, mangroves and paperbark forests, tall open eucalypt forest and melaleuca forest.

Seasonal movements: In Australia, Sacred Kingfishers spend the winter in the north of their range and return south in the spring to breed.

Feeding: Sacred Kingfishers forage mainly on the land, only occasionally capturing prey in the water. They feed on crustaceans, reptiles, insects and their larvae and, infrequently, fish. The birds perch on low exposed branch on the lookout for prey. Once prey is located, the Sacred Kingfisher swoops down and grasps it in its bill, returning to the perch to eat it.

Breeding: For most of the year Sacred Kingfishers are mainly solitary, pairing only for the breeding season. Usually two clutches are laid in a season. Both sexes excavate the nest, which is normally a burrow in a termite mound, hollow branch or river bank. The nest chamber is unlined and can be up to 20m above the ground. Both sexes also incubate the eggs and care for the young.

Calls: The voice of the Sacred Kingfisher is a loud "ek ek ek ek" repeated continuously throughout breeding season. Birds also give a "kee kee kee" in excitement and a series of chirring, scolding notes when alarmed.

Minimum Size: 19cm

Maximum Size: 24cm

Average size: 21cm

Average weight: 45g

Breeding season: September to December; occasionally extended to March, if conditions are favourable.

Clutch Size: 3 to 6

Incubation: 18 days

Nestling Period: 26 days

(Sources: www.birdsinbackyards.net and "The Slater Field Guide to Australian Birds - Second Edition")

__________________________________________

 

© Chris Burns 2021

 

All rights reserved.

 

This image may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying and recording without my written consent.

Many thanks for your visits, faves and comments. Cheers.

 

Sacred Kingfisher

Scientific Name: Todiramphus sanctus

Description: The Sacred Kingfisher is a medium sized kingfisher. It has a turquoise back, turquoise blue rump and tail, buff-white underparts and a broad cream collar. There is a broad black eye stripe extending from bill to nape of neck. Both sexes are similar, although the female is generally lighter with duller upper parts. Young birds are similar to the female, but have varying amounts of rusty-brown edging to feathers on the collar and underparts, and buff edges on the wing coverts.

Distribution: The Sacred Kingfisher is common and familiar throughout the coastal regions of mainland Australia and less common throughout Tasmania. The species is also found on islands from Australasia to Indonesia and New Zealand.

Habitat: The Sacred Kingfisher inhabits woodlands, mangroves and paperbark forests, tall open eucalypt forest and melaleuca forest.

Seasonal movements: In Australia, Sacred Kingfishers spend the winter in the north of their range and return south in the spring to breed.

Feeding: Sacred Kingfishers forage mainly on the land, only occasionally capturing prey in the water. They feed on crustaceans, reptiles, insects and their larvae and, infrequently, fish. The birds perch on low exposed branch on the lookout for prey. Once prey is located, the Sacred Kingfisher swoops down and grasps it in its bill, returning to the perch to eat it.

Breeding: For most of the year Sacred Kingfishers are mainly solitary, pairing only for the breeding season. Usually two clutches are laid in a season. Both sexes excavate the nest, which is normally a burrow in a termite mound, hollow branch or river bank. The nest chamber is unlined and can be up to 20m above the ground. Both sexes also incubate the eggs and care for the young.

Calls: The voice of the Sacred Kingfisher is a loud "ek ek ek ek" repeated continuously throughout breeding season. Birds also give a "kee kee kee" in excitement and a series of chirring, scolding notes when alarmed.

Minimum Size: 19cm

Maximum Size: 24cm

Average size: 21cm

Average weight: 45g

Breeding season: September to December; occasionally extended to March, if conditions are favourable.

Clutch Size: 3 to 6

Incubation: 18 days

Nestling Period: 26 days

(Sources: www.birdsinbackyards.net and "The Slater Field Guide to Australian Birds - Second Edition")

__________________________________________

 

© Chris Burns 2021

 

All rights reserved.

 

This image may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying and recording without my written consent.

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 65986

Unfortunately the spider is out of focus but I love this picture.

It was taken by my daughter with her mobile phone and it was an opportunity for the "strict" father to scold her for not carrying her camera at all times!

Listen to the animals

Listen to the trees

Listen to the spirits of the Earth

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed

 

Listen to the rivers

Listen to the sea

Listen to the spirits of the deep

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed

 

She sent the drought to warn us

She sent the storms to scold us

But we don't listen

We burn and we break

And we take and we take

And we take

Till it's too late

 

Oh where did the beasts go?

Where did the trees go?

Where will man go

When he has lost

The heartbeat

Beneath his feet

 

Oh this is our home

She gives us home

Mother Earth

Can you feel

 

Her heartbeat

Beneath your feet

Heartbeat

Beneath your feet

Heartbeat

Beneath your feet

  

Karliene

Music:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=caIo1UGSDgw

 

font: Riesling

 

See more in my Winter set Here

 

John Clare

 

The Shepherds Calender.

 

Now love teazd maidens from their droning wheel

At the red hour of sunset sliving steals

From scolding dames to meet their swains agen

Tho water checks their visits oer the plain

 

 

that it understood every word. And has filed it for reference :-)

Charlotte Gray

 

Happy Caturday!!

 

emma, our rescue cat, 3 years old, cary, north carolina

 

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 34746

It was only a spit ball! Honestly, some teachers simply don't understand what is amusing...

 

I've seen a lot of steampunk themed shots in Second Life and also a lot of school themed shots - but I can't bring to mind a steampunk school shot. So here is an idea of what one might be like. Let me know if there are more!

 

Thank you very much Alison for standing in as the school mistress and to Leena for waiting on the airship in the background for hours while I set the shot up and kept changing my mind about things. First person to spot the computer game I referenced may have smugness rights over other commenters.

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 2321

Listen to the animals

Listen to the trees

Listen to the spirits of the Earth

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed.

 

Listen to the rivers

Listen to the sea

Listen to the spirits of the deep

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed.

 

She sent the drought to warn us

She sent the storms to scold us

But we don't listen

We burn and we break

And we take and we take

And we take

Till it's too late.

 

Oh where did the beasts go?

Where did the trees go?

Where will man go

When he has lost

The heartbeat

Beneath his feet.

 

Oh this is our home

She gives us home

Mother Earth

Can you feel

Her heartbeat

Beneath your feet.

 

Heartbeat

Beneath your feet

Heartbeat

Beneath your feet.

 

Listen to the animals

Listen to the trees

Listen to the spirits of the Earth

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed.

 

Listen to the rivers

Listen to the sea

Listen to the spirits of the deep

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed.

 

Listen to the animals

Listen to the trees

Listen to the spirits of the Earth

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed.

 

Listen to the rivers

Listen to the sea

Listen to the spirits of the deep

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed.

lyricstranslate.com/en/karliene-mother-earth-lyrics.html

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. R_3076

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 63097

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 63440

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 62768

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 65099

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 38000

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dr2VyUvzrwI

 

THE WAY THINGS WERE

 

Once upon a time there was a free land,

beauty rested upon it everywhere. There

were rivers of fresh clear water, where

Bears of every kind would fish and play.

There were Wolves with their mystic howl,

telling of ancient times and singing to the

moon. The trees would talk and whisper,

laughing with every breeze. The flowers in

the meadow lands were happy to peek their

heads to each fresh new day. And they would

be star struck every night with the moon's gentle

bright glow! The Buffalo would graze in the meadow

and laze around on a sunny day and listen to the songs

of the Meadow Lark as he happily cut across the grass

lands. The rains had their time to pour and the fruits and

nuts of every kind would grow. It was a vast and beautiful

place, where harmony abound. The ancient people there

would give thanks and prayers for their bountiful harvest.

They payed homage to all of nature just taking where they

should and leaving where they could. Nothing out of place.

The kids would play in the fields and leap with the gentle

Deer. For there wasn't yet that kind of fear between these

people and their brothers and sisters in nature. All of nature

had a gift and a message to send. From the wise old owl, the

snake that slithered along to every rock, tree and blade of grass.

Their ceremonies would make all the woodland creatures in awe.

Hearing the gentle yet deep beat of the drum to the chanting and

dancing of the two-legged kind. Then in the breath of time there

were those that came. They didn't pay homage to nature, they

polluted her rivers and creeks. They killed more of the four-legged

than was necessary and sometimes they did it just because.

Nature didn't understand and so she reacted by giving stings to

the Insects and Scorpions. And killer instincts to the four-legged

to surrive. She gave droughts and sometimes downpours when it

should not be. She wanted to gently scold. But they didn't listen.

Then things changed and fear was begotten into this beautiful land.

Beauty still exists within her. You just have to dig deeper to find it!

We must never give up hope and always love and remember in the

far reaches of our hearts, the way things were....And only can we

change it back again!

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 64393

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 58725

He'd clasp his head in his hands, feeling terrible about what Aaron had to say, it was building the guilt in his head into something bigger and heavier than he could handle it; the push, of his words making him feel darker, lower - He knew he didn't get to choose, he knew all of this... The scolding words of calling him selfish would have his head then roll back and he'd cast an empty stare at Aaron; he looked defeated; eyes red and cheeks gaunt, the shake of his body still happening from the shock of what they were currently dealing with and then, the words... Selfish.

 

Everything he was trying not to be, yet, despite it all, in fact, Aaron thought he was incredibly selfish.

 

He'd disappointed him.

He'd failed.

Taken@Mindful Cove

 

inspiration

 

Listen to the animals

Listen to the trees

Listen to the spirits of the Earth

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed

 

Listen to the rivers

Listen to the sea

Listen to the spirits of the deep

Begging us please

Stop listening to greed

 

She sent the drought to warn us

She sent the storms to scold us

But we don't listen

We burn and we break

And we take and we take

And we take

Till it's too late

The uncomfortableness of this conversation showed on Noah's features and any kind of joke or humour was slated to a frozen apologetic grimace on his face "Yes" he'd agree with a mumble to the first question. He had arguments - This wasn't his business he was a guest - a nobody - he didn't matter, but he knew all of them were pointless as what mattered was who he sat next to and how he should remember to act when sitting next to 'said' people, Tara had lectured him for hours on pretty much 'shutting up' in her company for this reason - so he'd just offer back a tight nod in agreement.

 

What came next was a surprise - He didn't expect any sort of loyalty, he'd only been about 8-9 months into working for Leo, so the fact he was offering to take care of him like 'his own' hit right into that sweet spot of needing to belong... somewhere, to something,

 

"... I get it" he'd sound off with a nod "You're right... I'm.. Sorry" and he'd not make excuses, blame, Tara, the drink, the situation - Anything - It wasn't worth it - The pat of the cheek and the question if they had an understanding was sobering and was met with an "Of course"

.... and just like that - Noah was scolded, put in his place.

 

-------------------------

@The Base of Bad Ideas | GESTALT makes faces, I get to write with them & photograph them - that's a win win for me.

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally.

The common raven (Corvus corax), also known as the northern raven, is a large all-black passerine bird. Found across the Northern Hemisphere, it is the most widely distributed of all corvids. There are at least eight subspecies with little variation in appearance, although recent research has demonstrated significant genetic differences among populations from various regions. It is one of the two largest corvids, alongside the thick-billed raven, and is possibly the heaviest passerine bird; at maturity, the common raven averages 63 centimetres in length and 1.2 kilograms in mass. Common ravens can live up to 21 years in the wild, a lifespan surpassed among passerines by only a few Australasian species such as the satin bowerbird and probably the lyrebirds. Young birds may travel in flocks but later mate for life, with each mated pair defending a territory. Common ravens have coexisted with humans for thousands of years and in some areas have been so numerous that people have regarded them as pests. Part of their success as a species is due to their omnivorous diet; they are extremely versatile and opportunistic in finding sources of nutrition, feeding on carrion, insects, cereal grains, berries, fruit, small animals, nesting birds, and food waste. Some notable feats of problem-solving provide evidence that the common raven is unusually intelligent. Over the centuries, it has been the subject of mythology, folklore, art, and literature. In many cultures, including the indigenous cultures of Scandinavia, ancient Ireland and Wales, Bhutan, the northwest coast of North America, and Siberia and northeast Asia, the common raven has been revered as a spiritual figure or godlike creature. R_376

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 62541

I should have titled this... " when a seemingly lovely pic gets hijacked by houses with chicken legs," these guys were getting lonely with no place to go so I decided to have them tag a long in this pic... and quickly things get out of hand....

  

VIBE🎧

  

Hisa mainstore

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Hisa/123/117/22

HISA Flickr

HISA - Merryweather Cottage @Enchantment maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Nymphai/90/152/2911

HISA - Flora wildflower grass - Dark Greens @Enchantment

HISA - Climbing Vines - Green G @Anthem maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Anthem/127/128/1106

  

DRD Mainstore

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Death%20Row/144/139/24

DRD Flickr

DRD - Wild west Fair decor - fence A B C

DRD - Boho Garden Party Set @faMESHed

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/FaMESHed/217/230/800

DRD - Boho Garden Party - Light Poles

DRD - Boho Garden Party - Light Tent

DRD - Boho Garden Party - Stage

DRD - Boho Garden Party - Lemonade stand

 

Muniick Mainstore

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Port%20Lux/150/57/3401

Muniick Flickr

Muniick- Lowell's Offset Barrel Smoker

Muniick- (ADULT) Upcycled Cinder Block Bench

 

B-made mainstore

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Eagle/124/179/32

B-Made Tractor

 

Adorable Additions:

14. unstable. Scolded Blue

5. unstable. UNCOMMON Assault Pink

9. unstable. Family Pink

28. unstable. Sitted Dark

23. unstable. Stand Flamingo

24. unstable. Stand Dark

 

TLC Flickr

For you online shoppers

marketplace.secondlife.com/stores/124076

TLC songbird collection Blue Tit _standing

TLC Animesh Companion Cats Fatpack @ Cosmopolitan maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/No%20Comment/133/15/23

 

Have an awesome day and days ahead and take care out there! 🌹

"Petting, scratching, and cuddling a dog could be as soothing to the mind and heart as deep meditation and almost as good for the soul as prayer." – Dean Koontz

 

My puppy ran out into the garden to run from one place to another after the bugs, the butterflies, and even after his shadow. As soon as he heard me go out to the garden, he ran up and jumped on top of me to hug him. I couldn't refuse and immediately, his drooling kisses. This puppy is magical, doesn't remember my scolding, only knows how to give me love and happiness.

 

♫ Karen Souza - Feels So Good ♫

Credits: Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ Lis.Blog

 

MELODY

Tulssy Nail's Art

Glitzz

A.T Tattoo Studio

 

Feels So Good

Drumknott

No one has to tell me to love you I just do

All the stars are shining above you know it too

Everything you are is everything I need

You're the one who's changed

Everything I believe and it feels so good to me

 

Feels so good when you're talking to me

Feels alright sharing the air breath

Feels so fine to be here alone with you

And it's real it feels so good so good so good so

 

All I ever needed was one love who'd be true

All you ever needed was one girl me for you

You and me alone with only half a heart

We belong together and it never part and it feels so good to me

 

Feels so good when you're talking to me

Feels alright sharing the air breath

Feels so fine to be here alone with you

And it's real it feels so good so good so good so

 

Talk about it dream about it no one never live without it

Boy it's you don't never doubt it

You're the right guy on the right time right for me

Feels so good when you're talking to me

Feels alright sharing the air breath

Feels so fine to be here alone with you

And it's real it feels so good feels so good

And it's real it feels so good feels so good good

An eye-catching bird with ashy gray and lemon-yellow plumage, the Western Kingbird is a familiar summertime sight in open habitats across western North America. This large flycatcher sallies out to capture flying insects from conspicuous perches on trees or utility lines, flashing a black tail with white edges. Western Kingbirds are aggressive and will scold and chase intruders (including Red-tailed Hawks and American Kestrels) with a snapping bill and flared crimson feathers they normally keep hidden under their gray crowns. (allaboutbirds.org)

 

Saw this majestic beauty in my neighborhood in southern California, actually in winter, while walking my golden retriever, Wylie.

 

Thanks everyone who takes the time to view, fave or comment on my work! It is truly appreciated...

GAMBIA FEB 2019

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OFTEN found in pairs, in a variety of wood and scrub habitats, hunts insects from a prominent perch. Active, noisy and loud in scolding predators , is attracted to bush fires. to catch fleeing insects, often seen also following cattle. Love watching them, got quite close to this one, and it carried on hunting, and returned to the same perch above.

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THANK YOU for being a friend, have been back from the GAMBIA 50 DAYS, and have posted 50 Images, and still a few to show yet, hope your not fed up yet ? Enjoy the rest of the week dear friends, stay safe God Bless.....................

..............................Tomx.

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 53775

The fall migrating warblers fly through in mixed warbler species waves often associated with bands of Black-capped Chickadees. They aren't singing, but do emit their short warning or scolding calls.

 

They are constantly on the move looking for food to sustain them on the next leg of their journey south. There no control of the light situation.as they move through light and shadow. This one just caught something to eat, and paused for a few seconds.

 

St. Albert, Alberta.

A Bewick`s Wren surprised me when it landed almost close enough to touch, then it flew to this perch and scolded me. :-))

( I was shooting from inside my blind/hide at the time)

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 60008

*Areeyana : Sis, what are we looking at?

BBLove : The sky and stars, trees, birds....*

 

Sis BB has been asking me to take an elf photo with her for almost two weeks but as usual I was always busy with so many things to do and people to meet. During those time, she has been showing me a lot, I mean a lot of Elf's costume. She has so many nice outfit that she mix and match. She always managed to surprised me with a new one each time I see her. She is such a hoarders lol. She was also so patience waiting for me when I'm free.

 

So yesterday, I decided to do the photo session with her or else I will never gonna find the time to do it. The process of finding and trying the poses was a pain because I can't see her with the poses that she were using. Both of us would either, tp out and in, relog, avatar refresh and nothing works even when we went to another sim. I swear, I'm not gonna go through that again. I almost give up but not her. If it was me, I would have abandon the idea long time ago, that is how impatience I am lol. Meanwhile she was so cool and calm through out the process. I kept on saying sorry for my issues and she scold me saying stop saying sorry etc hehe...

 

Sis, you are such an amazing best friend and sister to me. Despite some of our differences, we managed to make it work and accept each other flaws and strength. I'm so glad that I met you and share all this adventerous and making all this sweet memories with you. Thank you so much for making my SL exciting everyday with your laughter, warm smile and gentle heart. Hugs you tight.

 

Your Sis Areeyana💖

 

This is the LM is.gd/0hahWT

 

This is the perfect song for this photo by Carole King - You Got A Friend is.gd/aG6SFV

 

You just call out my name

And you know wherever I am

I'll come running to see you again

Winter, spring, summer or fall

All you have to do is call

And I'll be there

You've got a friend

 

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 63776

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 62490

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 59255

It is a bird in the honeyeater family, and endemic to Australia. It is grey, with a black head, orange-yellow beak and feet, a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye and white tips on the tail feathers. It's a vocal species with a large range of songs, calls, scoldings and alarms, and almost constant vocalisations. They are gregarious and territorial; they forage, bathe, roost, breed and defend territory communally. 61616

This sporty gray catbird was either singing with delight or scolding me for invading its personal space - I'll let you the judge in this case.

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