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Knot, some still with their bright summer breeding plumage. A Redshank can be seen in the top left.

 

I spent a few hours in the late afternnon sunshine at Bamburgh Rocks just sitting by the rock pools watching the antics of a large flock of Knots with a mixture of Oystercatchers, Turnstones, Ringed Plovers and just a few Sandwich Terns. All but one of the Sandwich Terns headed out in search of food. I watched them diving into the sea and retrieving fish but they didn't return to the rocks.

 

Info from the RSPB.

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, It is grey above and white below; in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn. Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds.

The milions of tons of sand from the swept away dunes at the wash overs of Rottumeroog, washed by the immens waves and the supply of sand by the prevailing westerly wind from the west side to the east side, ensure that the island grows on the leeward eastern side.

The sand can remain in place due to the germination of marram grass that retains the sand with its root system.

So the bottom line is that the island on the west coast is crumbling and is growing on the east side, which is why one can speak of "Walking island".

This walking or also displacement takes place at a speed of 10 meters per year.

On the horizon behind the young dune tops we see the sister island "Rottumerplaat" and the channel "Het Schild" which separates the two islands.

The intention is to promote the silting up of this channel by carrying out large sand replenishments, so that these two islands can grow together.

With the climat change, sea level rise and extreme weather conditions a strong island strip off the coast will protect the mainland.

However, it will be necessary to maintain the islands again, so perhaps then they will be taken back again from nature........

   

In October 2013, a 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck the province of Bohol, Philippines, causing the land to sink by around 1 metre. Combined with a hundred years’ worth of sea level rise, the earthquake had catastrophic consequences for the islands of Batasan, Pangapasan, Ubay and Bilangbilangan, which have experienced partial or complete flooding ever since.

 

More Info´s: furillen.org/2020/03/03/ubay-island/

 

LM: maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Arcole/40/134/21

I strongly recommend you all to take the time to explore the angles of The Islands that disappeared recreated by the amazing team that are Serene and Jade. They have created a sim called Chesapeake Bay that just highlights beautifully how nature will ultimately swallow us all. The sim highlights how the houses sank into the body of water with birds everywhere. Its nature is striking and powerful.

 

I stumbled upon this short video when I was looking into Chesapeake Bay's history and will add it here as I think it beautifully highlights how powerful nature is. The Ballad of Holland Island House is a "short animation made with an innovative clay-painting technique in which a thin layer of oil-based clay comes to vibrant life frame by frame. Animator Lynn Tomlinson tells the true story of the last house on a sinking island in the Chesapeake Bay. Told from the house's point of view, this film is a soulful and haunting view of the impact of sea-level rise."

 

Thank you to Serene and Jade for adding this sim to my must see list:)

 

I hope you are all well xoxo

  

BlogPost

  

The Ballad of Holland Island House Short Animimation

  

✈ ✈ ✈ Chesapeake Bay ✈ ✈ ✈

  

In October 2013, a 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck the province of Bohol, Philippines, causing the land to sink by around 1 metre. Combined with a hundred years’ worth of sea level rise, the earthquake had catastrophic consequences for the islands of Batasan, Pangapasan, Ubay and Bilangbilangan, which have experienced partial or complete flooding ever since.

 

More Info´s: furillen.org/2020/03/03/ubay-island/

 

LM: maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Arcole/40/134/21

One of the most famous rock formations in Karkonosze. Seen on the trail from Śnieżka to Karpacz :)

 

Southern Stone (in Poland "Słonacznik") is located in the Western Sudetes, the band Giant, in the Giant Mountains National Park, west of the Cauldron of the Great Pond, on the northern slope Smogorni. It is a form of rock, consisting of several highly fractured granite island mountains, north of the pillar, viewed from the east side carved in the rock resembles a human figure. Rock is not impressive, situated at an altitude of 1423 m above sea level rises to a height of 12 m towers over the Upper Karpacz and the surrounding area, is the most characteristic and best-exposed rocks of the Giant Mountains, which can be seen from almost all the Jelenia Góra Basin. Fancy shapes rocks is the result of a complex and long process of erosion, during which they were deleted items less resistant to weathering and remain resilient. Southern Stone is one of the most interesting and most visited Giant rocks. Southern Stone takes its name from the fact that for the residents Podgórzyn, Przesieka and Borowice sun on a rock pointed south.

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Jedna z bardziej znanych skałek w Karkonoszach, na szlaku ze Śnieżki do Karpacza :)

 

Słonecznik znajduje się w Sudetach Zachodnich, w paśmie Karkonoszy, na terenie Karkonoskiego Parku Narodowego, na zachód od Kotła Wielkiego Stawu, na północnym zboczu Smogorni. Jest to forma skalna, składająca się z kilku silnie spękanych granitowych ostańców, z których północny filar, oglądany od wschodniej strony przypomina wykutą w skale postać ludzką. Skała nie ma imponujących rozmiarów, położona na wysokości 1423 m n.p.m. wznosi się na wysokość 12 m. Góruje nad Karpaczem Górnym i okolicami, jest najbardziej charakterystyczną i najlepiej widoczną skałą w Karkonoszach, którą widać prawie z całej Kotliny Jeleniogórskiej. Fantazyjne kształty skały to efekt złożonego i długotrwałego procesu erozyjnego, podczas którego zostały usunięte elementy mniej odporne na działanie warunków atmosferycznych, a pozostały odporniejsze. Słonecznik zalicza się do najciekawszych i najchętniej odwiedzanych skałek karkonoskich. Słonecznik wziął swoją nazwę stąd, że dla mieszkańców Podgórzyna, Przesieki i Borowic słońce nad skałą wskazywało południe – nazwa niemiecka Mittagstein, czyli Kamień południa.

The evolvement of dikes of carefully stacked clay to pile dikes into high-tech sensor dikes did not happen overnight. Already in Roman times, small dikes and dams were created. A look into the long Dutch tradition of dike building gives us insight on a deeply rooted culture of trial and error in a country where the sea level rises and the ground level is dropping. History shows that either a big flood or a tiny worm, but also national welfare can lead to big consequences and shifts in the flood protection system. Key moments in the ever evolving dike network are described over different dike periods.

Amsterdam Light Festival - “The ice is melting at the pøules!”, warned Danish Foreign Minister Villy Søvndal at the UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in 2009. His funny Danish pronunciation of the word ‘poles’ received more attention than the content of his message, minimising the urgency of the problem.

The Ice is Melting at the Pøules. Using two custom designed laser light machines, he creates a series of moving vertical lines based on British scientist Ed Hawkins’ beautiful ‘warming stripes’. These lines represent the global temperature rise over the past 169 years; blue is a relatively cool year, red a warm one. The stripes are alternated by a series of interlocked circles, depicting the rise of both temperature and CO2 levels worldwide. The changing height of the projection of both circles and stripes is, of course, also far from random: it corresponds to data on sea level rise.

 

Now we come to two very telling photographs of the ancient geological history of this place. During the Pleistocene Ice Age, a small ice-cap existed on Ben Lomond, which was the only plateau in the north-east to be glaciated. The Pleistocene Epoch is typically defined as the time period that began about 2.6 million years ago and lasted until just over 11,000 years ago.

 

The most recent Ice Age in Tasmania ended about 14,000 years ago and the glacier crust on this mountain melted away (and contributed to the sea level rise that filled what we now call Bass Strait).

 

As I've mentioned before this mountain was formed at least 180 million years ago through dramatic volcanic activity. Australia is a very ancient continent, far older than most of Europe or North America. Most of its mountains have worn down through millions of years of erosion and glaciation. The highest mountainous regions of the world are actually the most recent.

 

So here we look out on what amounts to a dry glacial riverbed. You can imagine the glacier once moved very slowly carving out a path which we can still see.

H. Osnowski | 2019 | Signalfarbe, Perlmutt und Moos auf Leinwand

 

In Marodistans größtem Binnensee, dem "Mare Obscurum", schwimmen nicht nur unzählige U-Boote der Landesmarine, sondern auch verschiedene Hai-Arten. Der Grinse-Hai ist die fieseste, gemeinste und unsozialste Art der hier vorkommenden Raubfische. Er hat den ganzen Tag nichts anderes zu tun, als hinter anderen Fischen herzuschwimmen und sich über deren Aussehen, Herkunft, Geschlecht oder Religionszugehörigkeit lustig zu machen. So kommt es nicht selten vor, dass andere Fische aufgrund solchen heftigen Mobbings zu weinen beginnen, was den Meeresspiegel noch mehr steigen lässt....

 

H. Osnowski | 2019 | Signal color, mother-of-pearl and moss on canvas.

 

In Marodistan's largest inland lake, the "Mare Obscurum", swim not only countless submarines of the national navy, but also various shark species. The grinning shark is the meanest, nastiest and most antisocial of the predatory fish found here. It has nothing to do all day but swim behind other fish and make fun of their appearance, origin, gender or religious affiliation. So it is not uncommon for other fish to start crying due to such violent bullying, which makes the sea level rise even more....

 

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Ram Pasture Peak (10,430’ above sea level) rises above a field of blue penstemons(Penstemon cyaneus) and assorted other scattered flowers along the Beartooth Highway just east of Cooke City Montana. Just beyond the meadow, along the line of trees, is Soda Butte Creek. While the field of flowers is in Montana, Ram Pasture Peak lies in Wyoming. The top of the peak is composed of volcanics. It lies in the northern Absaroka Mountains.

Two days ago just about every major news organization in the world reported on a new study of rising sea levels which predicts that Bangkok will be under water in 30 years.

forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1131540-thailand-live-thursday-3...

www.forbes.com/sites/jimdobson/2019/10/30/shocking-new-ma...

strong wind caused sea level rise and ice movement

Augustine Creek on Delaware Route 9 south of Port Penn, Delaware. Sea level rise is already affecting these estuarine marsh environments in the Delaware and Chesapeake Bays. This scene may not exist by the year 2100.

This shot is typical of much of the south coast. Across Bass Strait to the south lies my home in Tasmania. The average depth of Bass Strait is only 50 metres, which as any sailor will tell, makes for interesting seas in a storm.

 

About 10,000 years ago at the end of the last ice age, one could have walked across it since it was only with the sea level rises after the last ice age that Tasmania became an island. And we worry about the sea rising a metre or so today.

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, it is grey above and white below - in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn.

Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds. They eat: Shellfish and worms (Courtesy RSPB).

 

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it’s much appreciated.

A flock of Crab Plovers (Dromas ardeola) was making noises and gathering towards a high-land during the tidal sea level rise. In black and white, they looked fabulous against the blue sea. However this was not easy as I have to travel miles on very rough sea beach filled with chest height tidal waters to reach their vicinity. Pics was taken from Jamnagar, Gujrat, India.

"Sea level rise is like an invisible tsunami, building force while we do almost nothing." -- Benjamin H. Strauss, scientist and one of the authors of a new papers on the risk of sea level rise

But is the title really accurate now with climate change with scientists recently observing the presence of warm water at a vital point underneath the Thwaites Glacier, a part of the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet?

 

Although not yet proven it points to the cause behind the gradual melting of this ice shelf while also raising concerns about sea-level rise around the globe (see www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200129174526.htm).

 

So can we still believe in "forever" and "for eternity" now in relation to the biophysical world?

 

Time will tell! of course; as such, if we cannot then believe, perhaps we will then need titles like "The Shore of Immediacy" or "The Shore For Awhile" :)))

 

🎧 "Extinction" (Oceanvs Orientalis: soundcloud.com/oceanvsorientalis/vi-extinction

Sea water was in the news this week as an unusually high tide covered parts of US 80 between Tybee Island and Savannah. I took this shot of a normal high tide earlier in the year at Fort McAllister State Park.

Pfahlbauten als Schutz gegen steigenden Meeresspiegel?

Das Meer nähert sich den Pfahlbauten in Sankt Peter-Ording. Einige werden schon weiter landeinwärts wieder aufgebaut. Liegt es am steigenden Meeresspiegel oder nur an Wasserkraft, die sich immer mehr Sand in den Ozean spült?

 

Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, it is grey above and white below - in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn.

Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds. They eat: Shellfish and worms (Courtesy RSPB).

 

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it’s much appreciated.

Every year, during a couple of days in the rainy season, the streets of Can Tho in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta become flooded at high-tide. The floods have been getting worse in recent years, caused by a combination of subsidence and sea level rise.

 

www.bartbrouwer.com

 

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, it is grey above and white below - in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn.

Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds (Courtesy RSPB).

 

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, it is grey above and white below - in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn.

Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds. They eat: Shellfish and worms (Courtesy RSPB).

 

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it’s much appreciated.

Tangier is a town in Accomack County Virginia on Tangier Island in the Chesapeake Bay. The island's landmass has been reduced by 67% since 1850. Due to sea level rise the town will likely need to be abandoned in the next 50 years as much of the remaining land is expected to be lost. Print Size 13x19 inches. Happy Fence Friday

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, it is grey above and white below - in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn.

Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds (Courtesy RSPB).

 

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it’s much appreciated.

strong wind caused sea level rise and ice movement

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, it is grey above and white below - in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn. Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds.

Read more at www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/wildlife-guides/bird-a...

Tangier is a town in Accomack County, Virginia on Tangier Island in the Chesapeake Bay. Most residents are watermen harvesting crabs and oysters from the Bay and Tangier is well known for its seafood. The island was settled in the 1770's and today many people who live on Tangier speak a distinctive dialect derived from British English. The island's landmass has been reduced by 67% since 1850. Due to sea level rise the town will likely need to be abandoned in the next 50 years as much of the remaining land is expected to be lost. Print size 8x10 inches. Happy Bench Monday

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, it is grey above and white below - in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn.

Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds. They eat: Shellfish and worms (Courtesy RSPB).

 

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it’s much appreciated.

(Ammospiza maritima). Jefferson County, Texas.

 

Seaside Sparrows inhabit saline and brackish marshes along the coasts of the Atlantic and he Gulf. They are more often heard than seen, and spend most of their lives hidden deep in the tangle of cordgrass and other marsh plants. They build their nests just a few inches above the high tide line and may forage on the ground in flats exposed at low tide. Though populations in Texas are seemingly stable and robust, they are at risk from habitat loss as high quality saltmarsh is being lost at an alarming rate from coastal development, sea level rise, and a variety of other factors.

Black Oystercatcher

Point Pinos

California

Vintage wooden farm wagon. Tangier is a town in Accomack County Virginia on Tangier Island in the Chesapeake Bay. The island's landmass has been reduced by 67% since 1850. Due to sea level rise the town will likely need to be abandoned in the next 50 years as much of the remaining land is expected to be lost. Print Size 13x19 inches.

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, it is grey above and white below - in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn.

Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds. They eat: Shellfish and worms (Courtesy RSPB).

 

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it’s much appreciated.

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, it is grey above and white below - in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn.

Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds (Courtesy RSPB).

 

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it’s much appreciated.

Galveston County, Texas.

 

Coastal habitats are among the most imperiled natural communities on earth. Coastal prairies, native woodlots, and salt marshes like the one pictured are at risk from development, change in land use, invasive species, and sea level rise.

 

I normally try to avoid including human elements in my habitat images, however I've included subtle hints of our encroachment in this image and the previous one. Along the distant horizon here you can see a line of luxury housing developments built adjacent to this estuarine habitat.

(Pelecanus occidentalis). Galveston County, Texas.

 

This Brown Pelican cruised by when I was on my belly photographing shorebirds along the upper Texas coast. I dropped my shutter speed and panned with the bird so I could get some motion blur in the wings but keep the head and Bill sharp.

 

Brown Pelicans are a true conservation success story. By the mid 1900s their numbers were dangerously low from a combination of factors. Fortunately, due to laws put in place to halt market hunting and the online trade, the banning of pesticides that were causing significant nesting failures, and additional federal protections, Brown Pelican numbers have recovered significantly, and they are once again common along much of the coastline of the Americas. We should not take their abundance for granted however. Today they face additional risks such as sea level rise and the rapid development of coastal habitats.

Looking towards Holkham Gap from one of the small dune systems that have grown in the bay over the last 60 or 70 years. The dark areas along the horizon are the Corsican pines planted to stabilise the much older dunes in the 19th century. In the 1960s the whole beach was sandy but much of the area behind the newer dunes has begun to accumulate mud and transform into salt marsh. This process may well be halted by sea level rise.

Big spring tides and low pressure gave the feeling at Dee that sea level rise has already occurred. One of those days where you feel the water is going to pour over the walls - a bit like a mini tsunami. Outside the harbour at Donaghadee. Not so much wind effect today. Although stronger the wind was in the south - for which I am sure the various shopkeepers are extremely grateful!

Sea-level rise solution.

 

Gracias antesjota por tu estupendo comentario.

 

The Reddish Egret is one of the rarest egrets in North America. It's easily distinguished from other egrets and herons by its shaggy appearance, hyperactive feeding behavior, and pink-and-black bill.

Reddish Egret numbers in the U.S. were decimated by plume hunters in the 19th century, and populations never fully recovered. Like Snowy and Wilson's Plovers, this species is dependent on coastal habitats for successful foraging and breeding—the same areas that are vulnerable to sea level rise caused by climate change. Habitat loss is another problem for this bird.

Waterplace Park , Providence, Rhode Island. Unfortunately, beautiful city has been sinking at a rate of 4 inches per year, and with constant sea level rise, it will eventually be underwater!

Wake up call given out by this Knot (Calidris canutus) as I edged closer...this meant that half the flock of birds I was watching scooted over to the next rock pool island. There is always one keeping a beady eye on you! :))

 

Have a lovely Sunday everyone, have fun :))

 

Info from the RSPB.

The knot is a dumpy, short-legged, stocky wading bird. In winter, It is grey above and white below; in summer the chest, belly and face are brick-red. In flight, it shows a pale rump and a faint wing-stripe. It forms huge flocks in winter which wheel and turn in flight, flashing their pale underwings as they twist and turn. Many knots use UK estuaries as feeding grounds, both on migration and in winter, and therefore the population is vulnerable to any changes such as barrages, sea-level rises and human disturbance. Large numbers of birds visit the UK in winter from their Arctic breeding grounds.

@UN Climate Conference (COP23):

We should make every effort to prevent sea level rise !

 

Nature doesn't need us but we need nature (not only for taking nice pictures) !

Nature will go on, no matter what. It will evolve.

The question is, will it be with us or without us?

 

Drake Bay, Pacific Coast, Costa Rica

The Saltmarsh Sparrow is so named because it can be found in salt marshes along the Atlantic Coast of the United States. They build their nests in the marsh grasses just above the high tide mark, and amazingly they coordinate their nesting and breeding with the twice-monthly high tide cycles of the moon. Nest failure is sometimes caused by more frequent high tides or by storms. Of most concern is that their population has declined dramatically due to sea level rise and habitat loss. Scientists predict extinction of this species by 2050 if conservation efforts are not successful.

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