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“Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.” ― Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

 

One of three photos taken yesterday, while walking with my grandchildren over the viewing pedestrian bridge in the Stormwater Management Facility in Humber Bay Park, Toronto.

 

Stay safe, watch out for those who are more vulnerable than you are. #BeKind

This was taken at the Gregory Casey Stormwater Management Facility on Strandherd Drive in Barrhaven 5 minutes from my house. Thank you to my friend Dev at Devill Photography for telling me about this location.

 

Click twice on the image to enlarge it.

Taken on my walk through the Humber Bay Park West Toronto this morning. It was cold and the water was only partly frozen. So many ducks and 4 swans gathered in the unfrozen area of the Stormwater Management Facility.

 

Thanks for visiting, enjoy each day.

"May we who are merely inconvenienced

Remember those whose lives are at stake.

 

May we who have no risk factors

Remember those most vulnerable.

 

May we who have the luxury of working from home

Remember those who must choose between preserving their health or making their rent.

 

May we who have the flexibility to care for our children when their schools close

Remember those who have no options.

 

May we who have to cancel our trips

Remember those that have no safe place to go.

 

May we who are losing our margin money in the tumult of the economic market

Remember those who have no margin at all.

 

May we who settle in for a quarantine at home

Remember those who have no home.

 

As fear grips our country,

let us choose love.

 

During this time when we cannot physically wrap our arms around each other,

 

Let us yet find ways to be the loving embrace of God to our neighbors.

 

Amen.

While walking along the strolling deck above the stormwater management area, we saw a lot of branches in the water, which I have never seen before. Best seen large by clicking on the photo.

 

Stay safe and don't let your guard down in the holiday season. Do your part, stay apart and wear a mask. #BeKind

A view of the Humber Bay Arch Bridge, looking West. One of three photos taken on my walk alone for exercise and to get photos.

 

Thanks for visiting, stay healthy and hopeful. #BeKind

HFF! Candid shot of the children noting the decrease of ice today. The ducks and geese are either walking in the thin ice or swimming around. Best viewed large by clicking on the photo.

 

Taken while standing on the pedestrian bridge or viewing deck. Thanks for visiting. Stay healthy and hopeful. _#BeKind

Taken at the Stormwater Management Facility this afternoon in Humber Bay Park East

" Ten times a day something happens to me like this--some strengthening throb of amazement--some good sweet empathetic ping and swell. This is the first, the wildest and the wisest thing I know: that the soul exists and is built entirely out of attentiveness. Mary Oliver

" -

 

One of three photos taken yesterday, while walking with my grandchildren over the viewing pedestrian bridge in the Stormwater Management Facility in Humber Bay Park, Toronto.

 

All of the birds are hemmed into the thawed area, but that are is increasing daily.

 

Stay safe, watch out for those who are more vulnerable than you are. #BeKind

Standing on the little bridge, near to the Stormwater Management Facility, seen o my last photo, I took this shot which includes the CN Tower and that bright coat

Taken yesterday on my walk with grandchildren yesterday. Looking towards my condo from the Stormwater Management Facility in Toronto.

Cattails release their seeds in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. There are several stormwater management areas where wetland flora can thrive in the area.

 

Unfortunately, you can see a gentle scratch that was picked up on the scan of the film. I hate to squeegee my film after processing, since I very frequently damage the film. However, I always seem to keep making the same mistakes anyway. Old habits die hard.

 

Check out an album containing more of my photos shot in 2018.

 

Asahi Pentax Spotmatic 1

Asahi Takumar f4 300 mm lens

 

Manfrotto tripod and ball head.

Metered with a Sekonic L-358.

 

135 format Ilford FP4 Plus 125 ISO film.

 

Scanned using a Nikon Super CoolScan 9000 ED with the FH-835S 35mm strip film tray.

Happy Sunday and week ahead to all my Flickr friends,

 

One of two photos featuring ducks taken recently in the Humber Bay Park West. Best seen large by clicking on the photo.

 

Thanks for visiting and for your comments.

American Bittern

 

Apparently someone at some point discarded their goldfish in this stormwater management pond. The bird caught five of them (of various colours) in the hour or so that I watched.

Taken recently on a walk with Ottavia and Gloria, two ardent Flickr members!! Enjoy your day and keep smiling:)

 

Please click on the photo to see it large in the light box. © All Rights Reserved

Explore #92 on November 18, 2011 - thanks © All Rights Reserved

 

No Usage Allowed in Any Form Without the Written Consent of Judy Meikle

The City of Lenexa in the US state of Kansas has taken a new approach to stormwater management issues in partnership with the local community. Rather than defining stormwater as a problem to solve it now looks upon it as an asset upon which to capitalise. The result has led to an innovatively designed dam and spillway with impressive architectural features.

 

Lake Lenexa dam was completed in 2007 and its design and associated improvements not only provide for flood control and water quality issues, but have also made a valuable addition to the city’s park system.

 

Following major storms and flooding in 1998, the City of Lenexa embarked on a new stormwater management programme called ‘Rain to Recreation’. The programme was an opportunity to take a fresh look at the issue from a more environmentally focused perspective. The objectives of the programme include capturing stormwater in the upstream wetlands and removing sediment to improve water quality. In addition, the programme also focuses on the protection and restoration of the natural environment, and providing recreational and educational opportunities for the community. Hence the idea of turning rain into recreation was born.

 

Standing at 15m high and 244m long, Lake Lenexa dam is located just upstream of a housing development in a part a the city, with a total population of 45,000 residents. The structure is the largest and most visible component of the Rain to Recreation programme which meant that community involvement was a critical component from the outset.

 

‘The community was very involved in the overall decisions about what the dam was going to look like,’ says Scott R Brand, geotechnical engineer from Black and Veatch who oversaw the design and construction of the dam and spillway. ‘An extensive community outreach programme was held with the community to get a consensus on the design aspects of the project.’

 

Due to the high visibility of the scheme, aesthetics played an important role in the design of the dam, bridge and spillway sections. Architectural plans were all coordinated to maximise benefit to the community.

 

The unique layout and principle features of the dam and spillway structure symbolise the cycle of water as it moves from nature into the urban environment and then back to nature. Elements in the design include a curved dam alignment and an ogee spillway. Unusual architectural spillway features include curvilinear spillway walls, a spout structure, landscaping plans, recreational trails and a stilling basin design.

 

The spillway bridge is one of the most interesting architectural elements of the project. It consists of a curved concrete section spanning the spillway just downstream of the ogee spillway and upper basin areas. The bridge has a separate viewing canopy on a cantilevered section supported by drilled piers socketed into the underlying bedrock. The idea is for this to be a focal point of the project where visitors can view the cascading pools and fountains from the pedestrian bridge which spans the spillway.

 

Park and educational facilities surround the dam and reservoir. Stream restoration projects and shoreline improvements have also been made. The effects to downstream habitats were minimised by providing stream flow augmentation.

 

Source: www.waterpowermagazine.com/features/featuredesigner-label...

The bees were attracted to the Irish-grown, green roof system which has a number of positive impacts on the environment. Not only does the roof promote urban biodiversity, but improves stormwater management by reducing rainwater runoff and enhances overall water quality. The greenery also reduces dust and air pollutants and provides heat insulation, which helps to advance the University’s sustainability goals.

 

The extensive vegetated roofing system is composed of a range of different plant varieties including sedums, small grasses, herbs and flowering herbaceous plants, all which require minimal maintenance. Species in the green roof may include Sedum Acre Aureum, Sedum Album Coral Carpet, Sedum Album Mini, Sedum Hispanicum, Sedum Summer Glory, Sedum Reflexum or Sedum Weihenstephaner Gold.

 

The build-up of the roof includes a reservoir board to store stormwater which is then used to maintain the plants. In the courtyard of the UCD Moore Centre for Business, a pollinator garden will further support the ‘All-Ireland Pollinator Plan’ with pollen-rich flowers and safe nesting sites along the garden edges. In time, the open green space will be used to host student events.

 

A new bicycle park will also feature as part of the outdoor enhancements around the UCD Moore Centre for Business.

  

the UCD College of Business is undergoing a €20m expansion to help grow its facilities to better prepare students for ever-changing work environments. This part of the €65m investment to develop the UCD College of Business strategy announced in 2016.

 

The new UCD Moore Centre for Business will open September 2019, and will feature interactive learning, extensive co-working zones, and a 320-seat lecture theatre.

 

The facility, under construction next to the UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business at Belfield, will also include an Entrepreneurship and Innovation Hub, Media Suite, Skills Quarter Support Area, and THINK Lab.

 

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The bees were attracted to the Irish-grown, green roof system which has a number of positive impacts on the environment. Not only does the roof promote urban biodiversity, but improves stormwater management by reducing rainwater runoff and enhances overall water quality. The greenery also reduces dust and air pollutants and provides heat insulation, which helps to advance the University’s sustainability goals.

 

The extensive vegetated roofing system is composed of a range of different plant varieties including sedums, small grasses, herbs and flowering herbaceous plants, all which require minimal maintenance. Species in the green roof may include Sedum Acre Aureum, Sedum Album Coral Carpet, Sedum Album Mini, Sedum Hispanicum, Sedum Summer Glory, Sedum Reflexum or Sedum Weihenstephaner Gold.

 

The build-up of the roof includes a reservoir board to store stormwater which is then used to maintain the plants. In the courtyard of the UCD Moore Centre for Business, a pollinator garden will further support the ‘All-Ireland Pollinator Plan’ with pollen-rich flowers and safe nesting sites along the garden edges. In time, the open green space will be used to host student events.

 

A new bicycle park will also feature as part of the outdoor enhancements around the UCD Moore Centre for Business.

  

the UCD College of Business is undergoing a €20m expansion to help grow its facilities to better prepare students for ever-changing work environments. This part of the €65m investment to develop the UCD College of Business strategy announced in 2016.

 

The new UCD Moore Centre for Business will open September 2019, and will feature interactive learning, extensive co-working zones, and a 320-seat lecture theatre.

 

The facility, under construction next to the UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business at Belfield, will also include an Entrepreneurship and Innovation Hub, Media Suite, Skills Quarter Support Area, and THINK Lab.

 

www.ucd.ie/newsandopinion/news/2019/september/01/ucdmoore...

 

IMG_0123bwv

 

the UCD College of Business is undergoing a €20m expansion to help grow its facilities to better prepare students for ever-changing work environments. This part of the €65m investment to develop the UCD College of Business strategy announced in 2016.

 

The new UCD Moore Centre for Business will open September 2019, and will feature interactive learning, extensive co-working zones, and a 320-seat lecture theatre.

 

The facility, under construction next to the UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business at Belfield, will also include an Entrepreneurship and Innovation Hub, Media Suite, Skills Quarter Support Area, and THINK Lab.

 

The bees were attracted to the Irish-grown, green roof system which has a number of positive impacts on the environment. Not only does the roof promote urban biodiversity, but improves stormwater management by reducing rainwater runoff and enhances overall water quality. The greenery also reduces dust and air pollutants and provides heat insulation, which helps to advance the University’s sustainability goals.

 

The extensive vegetated roofing system is composed of a range of different plant varieties including sedums, small grasses, herbs and flowering herbaceous plants, all which require minimal maintenance. Species in the green roof may include Sedum Acre Aureum, Sedum Album Coral Carpet, Sedum Album Mini, Sedum Hispanicum, Sedum Summer Glory, Sedum Reflexum or Sedum Weihenstephaner Gold.

 

The build-up of the roof includes a reservoir board to store stormwater which is then used to maintain the plants. In the courtyard of the UCD Moore Centre for Business, a pollinator garden will further support the ‘All-Ireland Pollinator Plan’ with pollen-rich flowers and safe nesting sites along the garden edges. In time, the open green space will be used to host student events.

 

A new bicycle park will also feature as part of the outdoor enhancements around the UCD Moore Centre for Business.

  

_X4A5404BWV

Standing on ice, maybe lamenting their lack of open water in which to swim.

"An artist is not paid for his labour but for his vision." James Whistler

 

My grandson, Ellis called me to look at these animal footprints on the frozen Stormwater Management site. He wondered what made the mark next to them. I suggested that maybe a person lay down on the little bridge and drew the print, besides the footprints. He wondered whether it was a rabbit that made the footprints. I am happy to see him observing and questioning 😊

HFF! " Humber Bay Park is an important component of the network of waterfront parks and although it is a constructed land form it is one of the few naturalized places along Toronto’s Waterfront."

 

"The Mimico watershed is a completely urbanized watershed within Toronto and Region Conservation’s jurisdiction, with over 30% of its landmass featuring industrial land-uses and over 60% of its reach artificially channelized. As a watershed shaped so extensively by human intervention, its management requires close attention to the protection, enhancement and expansion of its remaining natural systems and the improvement of its water quality by improving and limiting urban storm water runoff."

 

This man is a photographer, who just took a photo of the many ducks and geese swimming.

HFF! Happy Fence Friday! Showing how frozen the Stormwater Management Facility deck.

Taken in Humber Park at the Stormwater Management facility, while I was in the strolling deck in Toronto, Best seen large by clicking on the photo to see the other ducks.

 

Lots of ice in the water and lots of ducks too. Merry Christmas! Joyeux Noël!

Taken at the Stormwater Management site. Most of the water is frozen so the ducks and geese have a limited space to swim.

HFF! A Stay-at-Home order is now in effect for all of Ontario. The order took effect at 12:01 on Thursday Jan 14 and will remain in effect for all of Ontario until at least February 11.

 

Cheers to our medical and other essential workers, including teachers, childcare workers, public transportation workers, Police Officers and Politicians who are working to keep us safe. #BeKind

One of three photos taken yesterday, while walking with my grandchildren over the viewing pedestrian bridge in the Stormwater Management Facility in Humber Bay Park, Toronto.

 

That floating wooden tray was put there by the City of Toronto. Every year a pair of grebes, use it as a platform to build a nest and care for their young. Both grebe parents are very involved.

 

Stay safe, watch out for those who are more vulnerable than you are. #BeKind

As we crossed the strolling deck, part of the stormwater management facility a couple photographers were set up to capture photos of the rare wild ducks.

HFF! Taken recently in the viewing deck/bridge of the Stormwater Management site in Humber Bay Park, Toronto. The ducks and geese are confined to the non-frozen area.

 

Best seen large by clicking on the photo

Taken yesterday while walking in the Humber Bay Park East, Toronto

The other are all lined up to fly! I just went for a walk and captured these birds in flight (series of three shots)

 

Stay blessed and enjoy your day, my friends:) © All Rights Reserved

 

No Usage Allowed in Any Form Without the Written Consent of Judy Meikle

HFF! Taken on a walk in Humber Bay Park East today while approaching the pedestrian bridge/viewing deck. Most of the ice is melted , but not all of it.

 

Best viewed large by clicking on the photo. Thanks for visiting, stay healthy and hopeful.

#BeKind

HFF! " Humber Bay Park is an important component of the network of waterfront parks and although it is a constructed land form it is one of the few naturalized places along Toronto’s Waterfront."

 

"The Mimico watershed is a completely urbanized watershed within Toronto and Region Conservation’s jurisdiction, with over 30% of its landmass featuring industrial land-uses and over 60% of its reach artificially channelized. As a watershed shaped so extensively by human intervention, its management requires close attention to the protection, enhancement and expansion of its remaining natural systems and the improvement of its water quality by improving and limiting urban storm water runoff."

  

Taken on my walk through the Humber Bay Park West Toronto this morning. It was cold and the water was only partly frozen. So many ducks and 4 swans gathered in the unfrozen area of the Stormwater Management Facility. It was not sunny so this looks like a black and white photo:)

 

Thanks for visiting, enjoy each day.

Taken on my walk in Humber Bay Park today. Best seen large by clicking on the photo.

 

"The Etobicoke and Mimico creeks watersheds originate on the south slope of the Oak Ridges Moraine and travel south to Lake Ontario. Together, they total 28,860 hectares in size. "

Centennial Drive, Kingston Ontario

North stormwater management pond

Taken yesterday at the Stormwater Management site in Toronto, which was mostly iced over except for a few patches .

“If there’s a book you really want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” -Toni Morrison

 

Taken with my iPhone SE yesterday on a walk with Keira and Ellis in the Humber Bay Park, Toronto. I am adding 3 other photos, taken with my camera.

 

Stay safe, watch out for those who are more vulnerable than you are. #BeKind

 

HFF! One of three photos taken while I was on a walk in my Humber Bay Shores neighbourhood today. The heron stands in the Stormwater Management Facility waiting to dive and catch a fish.

 

Thanks for visiting. Stay healthy, safe and hopeful. #BeKind

One of three photos taken on my walk alone for exercise and to get photos.

 

Thanks for visiting, stay healthy and hopeful. #BeKind

I went for a walk yesterday, through the Humber Bay Park West and found a group of photographers with long lenses taking photos of the large group of ducks congregating in the Stormwater Management Facility. So many photo ops! Best seen large by clicking on the photo,

 

Thanks for visiting and enjoy your day.

 

One of six photos of people seen along the way on my walk from home to Sunnyside Beach in Toronto today. It took me about an hour and a half for the return trip, A beautiful day, sunny without being too hot. Best seen large by clicking on the photo.

 

Thanks for visiting, commenting or faving my photos. Enjoy each day!

 

HFF! The Humber Bay Park's Stormwater Management Facility employs a state-of-the-art environmental design to improve the water running into Lake Ontario.

 

Runoff is collected and directed into the first of a series of five cells in the treatment basin area. As the stormwater flows into the cell it must pass through a series of screens which are suspended from the pontoons and decks. The screens help to suspend and drop sediments and other pollutants to the bottom of the cell areas, thereby improving water quality before it is returned to lake Ontario. The last cell contains a complex wetland that further assists in the purification process . The decks are designed for strolling and observing the facility."

This photographer uses a very long lens to photograph the wildlife at the Stormwater Management Facility, Toronto. Best viewed large by clicking on the photo.

  

Thanks for visiting, stay healthy and hopeful. #BeKind

Virginia Key, Key Biscayne, FL

 

Yes, it's that tree again... one of my favorite trees. The shot isn't spectacular but I am happy that my tree is still there. A few weeks ago when I drove over the Rickenbacker Causeway to my horror I had to see that most trees along Hobie Beach and Virginia Key had been cut down and most of the beach areas closed off. It looks horrible. My trees on Hobie Beach and Virginia Key are still standing, but who knows for how long?

 

View On Black

 

I did an internet search and that's what I found:

 

Rickenbacker Causeway Shoreline and Roadway Protection Project

The project is along Rickenbacker Cswy south shoreline areas, located on Hobie Island (to the west) and Virginia Key (to the east), bisected by the Rickenbacker Cswy in Miami, Florida. The scope of work includes three components: 1) shoreline stabilization; 2) stormwater management and parking improvements; 3) exotic vegetation removal and landscaping of upland area.

 

Exotic vegetation removal? Yeah right! They just want more paved parking spots and then probably charge everyone for parking there. That's what I think.

This is a picture of a marsh in an artificial pond which is part of the stormwater management system at Anne Arundel Community College (AACC) in Arnold, Maryland.

I went for a walk yesterday, through the Humber Bay Park West and found a group of photographers with long lenses taking photos of the large group of ducks congregating in the Stormwater Management Facility. So many photo ops! Best seen large by clicking on the photo,

 

Thanks for visiting and enjoy your day.

 

Stormwater Management System

Humber Bay Park East

Toronto, ON

 

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D800 | Nikkor 20mm 1.8G | 1/2000 sec | f5.6 | ISO 160

All Image Rights Reserved to Randy Barba

Stormwater Management System

Humber Bay Park East

Toronto, Ontario

 

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D800 | Nikkor 28-70 2.8D @ 40mm | 1/640 sec @ f5 | ISO 100

All Image Rights Reserved to Randy Barba

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