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Once upon a time, taking in consideration the concept of environmental care and sustainable architecture "the Tzar" expanded his property and built the bathroom.

 

Nikon F2AS

Zoom-NIKKOR 80~200mm f/4 AI-s@200 mm

1/250 sec@f/11

Kodak Tmax 400@ISO 500

Nikon L1bc filter

Diafine 3,5+3,5 min

Pabellón España Expo Zaragoza 2008, una ventana a la esperanza

Pavilion Spain Expo Zaragoza 2008, one window to the hope

El lema del Pabellón de España fue “Ciencia y Creatividad”, y en él se mostró una visión, moderna y dinámica, que refleja la actualidad científica y creativa de España. También contó con la primera exposición del mundo sobre el cambio climático titulada: “Comprender el clima para preservar el planeta”. Además de esta exposición, el pabellón en sí mismo fue una muestra de que el desarrollo y el respeto al medio ambiente pueden ir unidos, pues el edificio entero es un ejemplo de arquitectura sostenible en el uso de materiales, la construcción bioclimática que permite un gran ahorro energético y la integración de energías renovables.

The motto of the Pavilion of Spain was " Science and Creativity ", and in him a vision showed itself, modern and dynamic, that reflects the scientific and creative current importance of Spain. Also it possessed the first exhibition of the world on the climate change titled: " To understand the climate to preserve the planet ". Besides this exhibition, the pavilion in yes same was a sample of which the development and the respect to the environment can be joined, since the entire building is an example of sustainable architecture in the use of materials, the construction bioclimática that allows a great energetic saving and the integration of renewable energies.

Institute for Bio-Sustainability | Architecture by Cláudio Vilarinho

Once upon a time, taking in consideration the concept of environmental care and sustainable architecture "the Tzar" expanded his property and built the bathroom.

 

Nikon F2AS

Zoom-NIKKOR 80~200mm f/4 AI-s@200 mm

1/250 sec@f/11

Kodak Tmax 400@ISO 500

Nikon L1bc filter

Diafine 3,5+3,5 min

KASHAN, Isfahan province, Iran — Beautiful Iranian desert architectural elements in rooftops of Kashan palaces, including vented domes and badgirs or wind catching towers for air conditioning using the desert wind and underground cold water storage.

 

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I can hardly wait to go outside again and welcome the fresh greens in our parks and gardens. For the moment I decided to do some digital gardening instead. In this image I did this on the plant covered city hall of Venlo - a city in the South East of the Netherlands. The original building was designed by Ktaaivanger Architects and is an incredible marvel of sustainable architecture, both visible and invisible.

www.fordingbridge.co.uk

 

Fordingbridge designed and built this 120sqm sustainable flexible nursery building for Surestart.

 

Fordingbridge specialise in creating practical, energy and cost effective buildings which are intrinsically sustainable and are available at an affordable price.

 

Our buildings can be adapted to suit a wide variety of uses, from single school classroom buildings for nursery, primary and secondary education to large retail buildings and visitor centres.

 

We use a tried and tested building construction system using pre made elements which are then assembled on site. This minimises construction time and limits disruption to you and your project.

 

The building has an Integral canopy which provides an all-weather shaded play area and creates protection from solar gain.

 

The frame is a curved sustainably sourced FSC accredited Glulam timber-frame and Thermowood timber cladding provides an attractive finish.

 

The building is constructed with low maintenance highly insulated composite walls and roof to reduce heat loss from the building.

 

For more information about the building and our other projects please visit www.fordingbridge.co.uk/portfolio/?Surestart-childrens-ce...

   

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SHANGHAI, China — The spiraling curves of the imposing glass facade of the super-tall Shanghai Tower.

 

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Curated stream of my best photos

• My best selling photos

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©2019 German Vogel - All rights reserved - No usage allowed in any form without the written consent of the photographer.

Institute for Bio-Sustainability | Architecture by Cláudio Vilarinho

School of Architecture | Architecture by Fernando Távora +

Institute for Bio-Sustainability | Architecture by Cláudio Vilarinho

For more information on this building and it's sustainable features please visit www.fordingbridge.co.uk/portfolio/?Grovelands-Early-Years

[Kandovan, East Azerbaiyan, Iran] The Kandovan rural ancient village near Tabriz, a unique still inhabited troglodyte mountain enclave of homes carved as refreshing caves into the rocks, with some colorful clothes hung up to dry.

  

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©2017 Germán Vogel - All rights reserved - No usage allowed in any form without the written consent of the photographer.

Quadralectics Architecture - Marten Kuilman (2011).

quadralectics.wordpress.com/4-representation/4-2-function...

 

Fear as a psychological entity is something for the young, inexperienced adults facing the complexities of life and for the elderly and retired. In the latter case fear is often related to the end of their visible visibility period, known as death. Fear, as an instinctual emotion, is the most persistent and all-embracing of the four basic human emotions: fear, aggression, nurture and desire. The Greek word for fear is phobos, which points in a psychiatric context (phobia) to an intense and irrational situation, activity, things or persons. Emotional intensity is an important constituency of fear, which can be translated as a heightened visibility. The psychological entity of fear, as seen in a quadralectic context, is the emotion, which breaks loose shortly after a maximum approach (intensio) to one-self is experienced.

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The theme of anxiety and fear is closely related to the existentialism of the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard (1813 – 1855). He placed in his book ‘The Concept of Anxiety’ (1844) the psychological entity of unfocused fear in an environment of sin, with a reference to Adam, who was forbidden to eat the apple (of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil). The prohibition implied a form of freedom, either to eat or not to eat. Kierkegaard drew the conclusion that Adam’s state of initial bliss was the result of ignorance, which ended with the predicament of losing his freedom when consuming the ‘knowledge of good and evil’. The result is a state of anxiety, and a lost innocence.

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The theme of ‘fear’ was taken up by the Belgian activist and philosopher Lieven de Cauter (Koolskamp, 1959). His network organization is called Oxumoron – meaning, in the right spelling as oxymoron, a trope uniting extremes or opposites. The name probably reflects the hidden oppositional mind of its creator. He described in his book (De CAUTER, 2004) a society (city), which was divided up to an individual level, following ideas from the Japanese architect Kisho Kurakawa (1934 – 2007).

 

The latter was a founding member of the Japanese Metabolism movement, aiming at sustainable architecture with flexible urban models for a rapidly changing society. Kurakawa’s Nakagin Capsule Tower in the Ginza area of Tokyo brought the concept of an individual living space in 1972 into practice. Hundred and forty capsules (containers) were stacked at angles around two round central cores. The units are detachable and replaceable – but this method could probably not prevent its destruction in the near future to make way for new developments.

 

De Cauter’s ‘capsular society’ is proposed as the ultimate protection against fear. It offers a bleak scenario for the near future in which ‘daily life is becoming a kaleidoscope of incidents and accidents, catastrophes and cataclysms’ (VIRILIO, 2003). Other philosophers, like the Italian Giorgio Agamben (Rome, 1942), derive their symbolism from the idea of a (prisoners) camp, in which people are brought together in an undemocratic way and have lost all their human rights.

 

CAUTER, de, Lieven (2004). De capsulaire beschaving. Over de stad in het tijdperk van de angst. Nai uitgevers Rotterdam. ISBN 90-5662-406-7

 

VIRILIO, Paul (1997). Open Sky. Verso, London. ISBN 1-85984-880-X

 

– (2003). Unknown quantity. Thames and Hudson, London.

  

[Isfahan, Kashan, Iran] The beautiful and elegant architecture of Kashan in central Iran, with a badgir (wind tower) and palace facade framed by the silhouettes of arches. The badgirs are an essential element of Iranian desert architecture designed to capture the breeze and exhaust warm air out, an ancient system of air conditioning.

  

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©2017 Germán Vogel - All rights reserved - No usage allowed in any form without the written consent of the photographer.

School of Medicine...the university portray the beautiful concept of sustainable architecture.Preserving flora and fauna around the campus such an impressive effort by the university.

This awesome building is on the outskirts of Nottingham University and I can't believe I've only just discovered it! This image was taken with the Sigma Art 85mm at around f5 and 100 iso. The colours, the lighting are litteraly perfect.

Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

 

WWW.DAVIDGUTIERREZ.CO.UK

 

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London | Architecture | Night Photography | London Underground

 

One Angel Square

 

One Angel Square[1] is an office building in Manchester, England. Construction work began in 2010 and was completed in February 2013. The landmark building is the head office of the Co-operative Group. Standing 72.5 metres (237.8 feet) tall, the building forms the centrepiece of the new £800 million NOMA development in the northern quarter of Manchester city centre. The building cost at least £105 million to construct and was sold on leaseback terms in 2013 for £142 million.

 

One Angel Square is one of the most sustainable large buildings in Europe and is built to a BREEAM 'Outstanding' rating. It is powered by a biodiesel cogeneration plant using rapeseed oil to provide electricity and heat. The structure makes use of natural resources, maximising passive solar gain for heat and using natural ventilation through its double-skin facade, adiabatic cooling, rainwater harvesting, greywater recycling and waste heat recycling.

 

The building's distinctive form has been compared to a sliced egg and a ship.[16] Its design was announced by architects 3DReid in May 2009 and construction began in July 2010 with a projected completion date in March 2013. In December 2012, the scheme surpassed its pan-European sustainability aims and achieved a world-record BREEAM score of 95.32%. It is also an energy-plus building, producing surplus energy and zero carbon emissions. The building has received numerous awards for its striking aesthetic and sustainability aims.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Angel_Square

   

California Academy of Sciences - www.calacademy.org/

 

This is a must see place if you're in the San Francisco area.

 

"Nearly 10 years and $500 million dollars in the making... The new Academy is a masterpiece in sustainable architecture, blends seamlessly into the park's natural setting, and is filled with hundreds of innovative exhibits and thousands of extraordinary plants and animals..."

Pipes Canyon - Mojave Desert - Pioneertown, California

Grimshaw was appointed to work in collaboration with local practice Jackson Architecture on the reorganisation and expansion of Southern Cross Station. As well as the transport interchange and associated track and signalling works, the redevelopment includes a major office building on Collins Street and a retail plaza serving the Central Business District’s west end.

 

The key generators for the station’s design were practical performance, ease of passenger circulation and an improved working environment for staff with sheltered, high-quality ticketing, baggage-handling, and waiting services. These are all equipped with comfortable seating, lighting and passenger information display systems.

 

The design focus of Southern Cross Station is the dune-like roof that covers an entire city block. The roof’s form plays a crucial role as part of the environmental envelope ensuring that it is symbol of sustainable architecture developed in response to the hot external climate and the internal need for diesel extraction and ambient cooling via natural ventilation.

Source: Grimshaw web site

  

Desert getaway in sDesert getaway in secluded Pipes Canyon in Pioneertown, California www.hawkandmesa.com

 

Photo by Lance Gerber

Lilium Eco House is a contemporary and sustainable home, that combines old and new ways of living. The house is named after the lily flower. It is meant to be an eco-house with solar panels on the roof, large windows facing south and west, vegetables growing in the conservatory and garden, high levels of insulation and daylight and materials absorbing the warmth of the sun.

 

Downstairs you find the combined kitchen and living room. The tiled dark tan floor and the conservatory/greenhouse almost give the room an outdoor feeling. Downstairs you also find a bathroom and a TV-hide-away behind the stairs. Upstairs you find a hobby room, a bedroom and a terrace.

 

The house is built on moduverse plates and once you´ve taken the roof off it can be cut in half showing the full interiors.

 

If you look closely you´ll see that I´ve been a bit cruel to both Star Wars and Minecraft figures...

Three Trees House

 

Passive daylighting, recycled lumber, recycled fly ash concrete, and grey water recycling

 

jeremylevine.com

Photography by Tom Bonner

The Senedd (English: Senate or Parliament; Welsh pronunciation: [ˈsɛnɛð]), also known as the National Assembly building,[1] houses the debating chamber and three committee rooms for the National Assembly for Wales in Cardiff. The 5,308 square metres (57,100 sq ft) Senedd building was opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 1 March 2006 and the total cost was £69.6 million, which included £49.7M in construction costs. The Senedd is part of the National Assembly estate that includes Tŷ Hywel and the Pierhead Building.

 

After two selection processes, the decision was taken that the debating chamber would be on a new site, called Site 1E, at Capital Waterside in Cardiff Bay. The Pritzker Prize-winning architect Richard Rogers won an international architectural design competition, managed by RIBA Competitions, to design the building. It was designed to be sustainable with use of renewable technologies and be energy efficient. The building was awarded an "Excellent" certification by the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM), the highest ever awarded in Wales, and was nominated for the 2006 Stirling Prize.

 

The Senedd was constructed in two phases, the first in 2001 and the second from August 2003 until it was handed over to the National Assembly in February 2006. Between phases, the National Assembly changed contractors and the project's management structure, but retained Rogers as the scheme architect. The building was nearly six times over budget and four years and 10 months late, compared to the original estimates of the project in 1997. Total costs rose due to unforeseen security measures after the September 11 attacks, and because the National Assembly did not have an independent cost appraisal of the project until December 2000, three years after the original estimate. Phase 2 costs rose by less than 6% over budget, and that phase was six months late, due to information and communication technology (ICT) problems.

IMAS, Hobart

TERROIR were Architects in Association with John Wardle Architects for the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) in Hobart.

 

IMAS received multiple recognition in the 2014 Tasmanian Australian Institute of Architects Awards; The Alan C Walker Award for Public Architecture; Alexander North Award for Interior Architecture; Sustainable Architecture Award; Urban Design Award; COLORBOND® Award for Steel Architecture

In establishing IMAS the University of Tasmania (UTAS) has recognized the importance of this field of scientific endeavour in the context of a sustainable future - both local and global. The new building will be a portal into an institute that brings together researchers from a number of parallel groups to create what will become an internationally renowned global research hub. Responsive to this vision, the new building will underpin the social, cultural and economic life of the City of Hobart.

Set in the highly contested public realm that is the historic Hobart waterfront the design for the new building recalls the scale and pattern of the traditional wharf structures and responds to the nature of the working port. With a view to engaging with the public realm the new building exposes the activities within, and invites interest through making a substantial exhibition space and theatre accessible to the public.

 

The 7,130M2 building will accommodate academics and researchers from UTAS, IMAS, CSIRO, Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACECRC), and the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS). Higher Degree Research students will be dispersed through the building to benefit from direct engagement with this diverse group. Undergraduate students will experience the collaborative learning and teaching laboratory spaces located at the ground floor. These spaces will also be visible from the public thoroughfare.

 

Laboratory facilities will be certified by the Australian Quarantine Inspection Service to QC2 requirements. These spaces have been carefully planned to achieve flexibility and serviceability well into the future. Ultra cold rooms operating at -23° will accommodate the precious ice cores that are collected from Antarctica and transported back to Hobart. The Antarctic supply and research vessel Auroa Australis will berth at the adjacent Princes Wharf over the winter months.

 

In keeping with the greater vision for a sustainable future the new building will be heated and cooled by water drawn from the Derwent River. Inherent to the prominent site selected by UTAS this represents the single most significant opportunity to reduce energy consumption. The project will achieve a 5 Star Design rating assessed by the Green Star Education tool (V1)

Source:Terrior

in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of Los Angeles, California

 

Passive daylighting, recycled lumber, recycled fly ash concrete, solar energy, grey water recycling, rain water capture, mobile shade panels.

  

jeremylevine.com

www.jeremylevine.com

Photography by Tom Bonner

The Sri Lankan Architect Geoffrey Bawa is regarded as one of the most important and influential Asian architects of the twentieth century. His international standing was confirmed in 2001 when he received the special chairman’s award in the eighth cycle of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture, becoming only the third architect and the first non-Muslim to be so honored since the award’s inception.

 

Bawa was born in 1919 and came late to architecture, only qualifying in 1957 at the age of thirty-eight, but he soon established himself as Sri Lanka’s most prolific and inventive architect. Although best known for his private houses and hotels, his portfolio also included schools and universities, factories and offices, public buildings and social buildings as well as the new Sri Lanka Parliament. His architectural career spanned forty years and was ended in 1998 by a stroke which left him paralyzed. He died in 2003.

 

Bawa’s work is characterized by sensitivity to site and context. He produced “sustainable architecture” long before the term was coined, and had developed his own “regional modernist” stance well in advance of the theoreticians. His designs broke down barriers between inside and outside, between interior design and landscape architecture and reduced buildings to a series of volumes separated by courtyards and gardens.

 

One of his most striking achievements is his own garden at Lunuganga which he fashioned from an abandoned rubber estate. This project occupied him for fifty years, and he used it as a test bed for his emerging ideas. The result is a series of outdoor rooms conceived with an exquisite sense of theater as a civilized wilderness on a quiet backwater in the greater garden of Sri Lanka.

sustainable architecture, Moscow 2007

Amsterdam, The Netherlands 🇳🇱 : Trams let the city breathe again. A Siemens Combino 13G type tramset is seen going along the Museumplein.

[Tabriz, East Azerbaijan, Iran] Stairs and door into the air conditioned basement of a 19th century Kashan palace house, an example of an old sustainable building using wind towers and underground chambers for cooling during the hot Iranian summers.

  

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©2017 Germán Vogel - All rights reserved - No usage allowed in any form without the written consent of the photographer.

Three Trees House

 

Passive daylighting, recycled lumber, recycled fly ash concrete, solar energy, grey water recycling, rain water capture.

 

jeremylevine.com

Photography by Tom Bonner

IMAS, Hobart

TERROIR were Architects in Association with John Wardle Architects for the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) in Hobart.

 

IMAS received multiple recognition in the 2014 Tasmanian Australian Institute of Architects Awards; The Alan C Walker Award for Public Architecture; Alexander North Award for Interior Architecture; Sustainable Architecture Award; Urban Design Award; COLORBOND® Award for Steel Architecture

In establishing IMAS the University of Tasmania (UTAS) has recognized the importance of this field of scientific endeavour in the context of a sustainable future - both local and global. The new building will be a portal into an institute that brings together researchers from a number of parallel groups to create what will become an internationally renowned global research hub. Responsive to this vision, the new building will underpin the social, cultural and economic life of the City of Hobart.

Set in the highly contested public realm that is the historic Hobart waterfront the design for the new building recalls the scale and pattern of the traditional wharf structures and responds to the nature of the working port. With a view to engaging with the public realm the new building exposes the activities within, and invites interest through making a substantial exhibition space and theatre accessible to the public.

 

The 7,130M2 building will accommodate academics and researchers from UTAS, IMAS, CSIRO, Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACECRC), and the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS). Higher Degree Research students will be dispersed through the building to benefit from direct engagement with this diverse group. Undergraduate students will experience the collaborative learning and teaching laboratory spaces located at the ground floor. These spaces will also be visible from the public thoroughfare.

 

Laboratory facilities will be certified by the Australian Quarantine Inspection Service to QC2 requirements. These spaces have been carefully planned to achieve flexibility and serviceability well into the future. Ultra cold rooms operating at -23° will accommodate the precious ice cores that are collected from Antarctica and transported back to Hobart. The Antarctic supply and research vessel Auroa Australis will berth at the adjacent Princes Wharf over the winter months.

 

In keeping with the greater vision for a sustainable future the new building will be heated and cooled by water drawn from the Derwent River. Inherent to the prominent site selected by UTAS this represents the single most significant opportunity to reduce energy consumption. The project will achieve a 5 Star Design rating assessed by the Green Star Education tool (V1)

Source:Terrior

Unique architectural design of ArtScience Museum Marina Bay Singapore

At home I live just two miles away from the home of Lever Brothers in Port Sunlight. Here a modern building is the German headquarters.

Designed by a team from Stuttgart, the futuristic Unilever-Haus is a model of sustainable architecture, and has received several awards, including the ‘World Architecture Festival Award 2009’.

 

CopenHill - Amager Bakke - at night…

 

“CopenHill, also known as Amager Bakke, is a power plant located on an industrial waterfront that is capable of converting 440,000 tons of waste into clean energy annually. It was designed by BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group) to double as public infrastructure, and is complete with tree-lined hiking trails and ski slopes on its roof along with the "tallest artificial climbing wall in the world" on its facade.” (1).

 

“Nearly a decade in the making, the landmark CopenHill waste-to-energy plant has finally opened in Copenhagen. CopenHill is the result of nearly ten years of thought, time and design. To complete the project, BIG worked with SLA, AKT, Lüchinger+Meyer, MOE and Rambøll. The plant aspires to embody the notion of Hedonistic Sustainability while aligning with Copenhagen’s goal of becoming the world’s first carbon-neutral city by 2025. The 41,000m2 project includes an urban recreation center and environmental education hub, turning social infrastructure into an architectural landmark. Beneath the slopes, furnaces, steam, and turbines convert 440,000 tons of waste annually into enough clean energy to deliver electricity and district heating for 150,000 homes. CopenHill features a continuous façade comprised of 1.2m tall and 3.3m wide aluminum bricks stacked like gigantic bricks overlapping each other.

 

CopenHill is a blatant architectural expression of something that would otherwise have remained invisible: that it is the cleanest waste-to-energy power plant in the world. As a power plant, CopenHill is so clean that we have been able to turn its building mass into the bedrock of the social life of the city – its façade is climbable, its roof is hikeable and its slopes are skiable. A crystal clear example of Hedonistic Sustainability – that a sustainable city is not only better for the environment – it is also more enjoyable for the lives of its citizens.” Bjarke Ingels, Founder & Creative Director, BIG.” (2).

 

Sources: (1) Lizzie Crook (October 2019). Dezeen. Available at www.dezeen.com/2019/10/08/big-copenhill-power-plant-ski-s...

(2) Eric Baldwin (October 2019). Arch Daily. www.archdaily.com/925966/copenhill-the-story-of-bigs-icon...

 

Grimshaw was appointed to work in collaboration with local practice Jackson Architecture on the reorganisation and expansion of Southern Cross Station. As well as the transport interchange and associated track and signalling works, the redevelopment includes a major office building on Collins Street and a retail plaza serving the Central Business District’s west end.

 

The key generators for the station’s design were practical performance, ease of passenger circulation and an improved working environment for staff with sheltered, high-quality ticketing, baggage-handling, and waiting services. These are all equipped with comfortable seating, lighting and passenger information display systems.

 

The design focus of Southern Cross Station is the dune-like roof that covers an entire city block. The roof’s form plays a crucial role as part of the environmental envelope ensuring that it is symbol of sustainable architecture developed in response to the hot external climate and the internal need for diesel extraction and ambient cooling via natural ventilation.

Source: Grimshaw web site

 

Fordingbridge have recently had the pleasure of creating the new headquarters for The Greenpower Education Trust, an organisation that promotes engineering as a rewarding career to anyone aged 9-25, while also focusing on sustainability, teamwork and the community.The centre was designed as an inspiring learning environment for participants and industry professionals as well as acting as an innovative test bed for low emission technologies.

 

The Centre has been designed with sustainbility at its core, using passive design and realistic low carbon technologies, carefully formulated by the team from Fordingbridge, Passivent and Emission-Zero

If you would like to know more information about the building please visit www.fordingbridge.co.uk

Fordingbridge have recently had the pleasure of creating the new headquarters for The Greenpower Education Trust, an organisation that promotes engineering as a rewarding career to anyone aged 9-25, while also focusing on sustainability, teamwork and the community.The centre was designed as an inspiring learning environment for participants and industry professionals as well as acting as an innovative test bed for low emission technologies.

 

The Centre has been designed with sustainbility at its core, using passive design and realistic low carbon technologies, carefully formulated by the team from Fordingbridge, Passivent and Emission-Zero

If you would like to know more information about the building please visit www.fordingbridge.co.uk

Hawk and Mesa Ranch

www.hawkandmesa.com

 

www.jeremylevinedesign.com

 

Pipes Canyon > Pioneertown > Mojave Desert > California

 

Photo credit: Lance Gerber

The information centre on the main level of the Centre for Alternative Technology (in the southern part of Meirionydd, Gwynedd, northwestern Wales, near Machynlleth, which is in Powys, Mid Wales), on a mostly sunny morning in early May.

 

Like the other structures at the Centre, it is designed as an example of environmentally sustainable, green architecture. In this case, the building recalls traditional Japanese houses.

 

According to the Centre's Website (consulted 1 March 2014), "CAT is an education and visitor centre demonstrating practical solutions for sustainability. We cover all aspects of green living: environmental building, eco-sanitation, woodland management, renewable energy, energy efficiency and organic growing." It was founded on the site of a former slate quarry in 1973 and has since expanded considerably from its original size and scope.

 

(My husband and I first visited it in 1989, then saw the extent of its growth when we returned in 2012.)

 

Slate blocks, chippings, and structures, such as the pool and fountain in this view, abound on the grounds of the Centre. This building included an information centre and display, a café, and a gift shop.

 

[Centre for Alternative Technology information building pool 2012 may 6 p; P1000256]

Picture used in this sites:

 

www.tripsavvy.com/golden-gate-park-4123397#step1

 

www.sfbaysuperbowl.com/flickrfriday-bay-area-museums#BGMm...

 

The Academy is now the largest public Platinum-rated building in the world, and also the world’s greenest museum. The Academy earned the platinum rating (highest rating possible) for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). This commitment to sustainability extends to all facets of the facility - from the bike racks and rechargeable vehicle stations outside the building to the radiant sub-floor heating inside the building to the energy-generating solar panels on top of the building!

 

Nearly 10 years and $500 million dollars in the making, it's finally here. The new Academy is a masterpiece in sustainable architecture, blends seamlessly into the park's natural setting, and is filled with hundreds of innovative exhibits and thousands of extraordinary plants and animals.

 

The Academy is a single structure but contains multiple venues, including the aquarium, the planetarium, the natural history museum and the 4-story rainforest. In addition, there's a 3D theater, a lecture hall, a Naturalist Center, two restaurants, an adjacent garden and aviary, a roof terrace, and an Academy store.

 

The building also houses the Academy science labs and administrative offices, including an extensive library and scientific archive consisting of more than 26 million specimens.

 

By any measure, Renzo Piano stands among the world's greatest architects. As the jury awarding him the 1998 Pritzker Prize wrote, “Piano achieves a rare melding of art, architecture, and engineering in a truly remarkable synthesis. He celebrates structure in a perfect union of technology and art.”

 

Picture taken from de Young Museum through a heavy glass.San Francisco. California.

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