new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged swaml

Identifier: baganda00john

Title: The Baganda

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: John Roscue

Subjects:

Publisher: MacMillian

Contributing Library: Gumberg Library, Duquesne University

Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

d to remove any propert)-, but might onlytake his wives and cattle. But if he was deposed because hehad been accused of some misdemeanour, the King alsocaptured his wives and cattle, provided that he could findthem. The wives and family would at once flee to places ofsafety when they knew that the chief had been deposed ; andthey would take away as much of his property as they couldremove without being caught. W^hen a chief was promotedto a new office, he was required to give up all his possessionsexcept the moveable goods ; nor did he receive any com-pensation, either for buildings or for any improvements whichhe might have made. This system deterred men from plant-,ing trees of slow growth, such as coffee-trees, upon officialestates, because they would not reap any benefit from them ; VIII govp:rnment 239 such trees they planted only upon the freehold estates of theclan. A chief was required to keep his official estates ingood order, or he would be fined and deposed, but the benefit

 

Text Appearing After Image:

FIG. -A ROAD AND BRnjGE THROUC^jIf A SWAMl. of any improvements he might make, or of the houses hemight build, was reaped by his successor. Each District-Chief had to maintain in good order a road, Roads andsome four yards wide, reaching from the Capital to his ^^^ Pcountry scat; in some instances, as in the case of Budu, this ^^^ 240 THE BAGANDA chap. road was nearly a hundred miles long. A chiefs country-seat was more like a small town than a village, for there hewas supreme, living in great state, and having a large enclo-sure in which there were often hundreds of women and slaves.In front of his main entrance a wide space was cleared, vary-ing in size according to his rank, but often two hundred yardssquare; this was kept free from weeds or grass. In theprovinces the District-Chief was the principal magistrate, andhe had his sub-chiefs to assist him in trying cases in theirdistricts. The sub-chiefs were independent of the chief in

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Title: The land of the muskeg [microform]

Identifier: cihm_16172

Year: 1895 (1890s)

Authors: Somerset, H. Somers (Henry Somers)

Subjects: Hunting; Chasse

Publisher: London : W. Heinemann

Contributing Library: www.flickr.com/search/?tags=bookcontributorCanadiana_org

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

FROM THE ATHADASKA LANDING 19 ran blood from the bites of the bull-doo; flies. As we marched at a foot-pace, we had not made more than five miles by camping-time. On the following morning we made a very early start, and soon passed the ox-train. Charley, the head of the Hudson Bay Company's transport on this road, an old hand at

 

Text Appearing After Image:

srUCK IN A SWAMl' the work, drove the horse-wagon and came ahead with us. Here and there we crossed little open meadows, and it was in one of these that the wagon became hopelessly bogged. The team could not draw it out of the mud-hole, so we unhitched the horses and waited for the coming of the oxen. On their arrival we harnessed five oxen

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Title: The land of the muskeg [microform]

Identifier: cihm_16172

Year: 1895 (1890s)

Authors: Somerset, H. Somers (Henry Somers)

Subjects: Hunting; Chasse

Publisher: London : W. Heinemann

Contributing Library: www.flickr.com/search/?tags=bookcontributorCanadiana_org

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

CAMIMNl. IN SWAMl* 87 I) siij)|)()se iina^iiicd. ^cry cold, nd so did 1 journey, iscn con- ; torrent, :ren_nth of liiul much ied down Several lave been away he a swirlino- beat back ;m with a ak(i one's At last, hausted, ty times ohn and 3und the haste to the way n a little wooden was pro- coyottes Is. The man had csideiuK di».'d as he had lived, upon the luiiitinL;- trail, ami had been buried in his deep forests, far from the (Kv(;llin!4s of men. The j;rave seemed pitiful in its lontdiness, but 1 suppose that it was as he would have wished. About midday we descended into an open flat, and, skirting- the climii)s of low bush, came to the jincture of the South I'ine and the main river. We. should nf)w b(; forced to cross to the; northern shore.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

'Alion MIDIiW WE l)liS( KNDi;!) 1N10_.\\ OI'KN ir.Al' and we thought it best to take the rivers in detail, crossimj- the south river first, and then turnino; our attention to the main stream, which was smaller and less ra[)id abov(; the conlluence, although still about six hundred feet broad. \\'(^ soon foimd, however, that the horses would be obliged to swim in any case, and as we had no wish to spoil our provisions and ammunition, or lose any of the pack animals, we determined to make a dug-out canoe, I" *7'

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.