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Playa de Cortadura de Cádiz.

 

Cometas de Kitesurfing y Gaviotas vuelan sobre el espacio aéreo de la playa.

 

2613 - 0784 - 24-05-2020 - 08-09-2020

La entrada de la primavera va llegando y con ella no podían faltar las moscas cernidoras y sus poses en el aire, alomejor de ahí viene el dicho... " Se entretiene con una mosca volando "..., la verdad es que resulta ciertamente hipnótico su " cernido" aéreo...

Copyright © Carhove 2012 - All Rights Reserved.

The Airco DH.9 (from de Havilland 9) - also known after 1920 as the de Havilland DH.9 - was a British bomber used in the First World War. A single-engined biplane, it was a development of Airco's earlier, highly successful DH.4 and was ordered in very large numbers for Britain's Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force.

 

Its engine was unreliable, and failed to provide the expected power, giving the DH.9 poorer performance than the aircraft it was meant to replace, and resulting in heavy losses, particularly over the Western Front. The subsequently-developed DH.9A had a more powerful and reliable American Liberty L-12 engine.

 

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

The DH.9 was designed by de Havilland for the Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 1916 as a successor to the DH.4. It used the wings and tail unit of the DH.4 but had a new fuselage. This enabled the pilot to sit closer to the gunner/observer and away from the engine and fuel tank. The other major change from the DH.4 was the choice of the promising new BHP/Galloway Adriatic engine, which was predicted to produce 300 hp (224 kW) and so give the new aircraft an adequate performance to match enemy fighters.

 

By this time, as a result of attacks by German bombers on London, the decision was made to almost double the size of the Royal Flying Corps, with most of the new squadrons planned to be equipped with bombers. Based on the performance estimates for the DH.9 (which were expected to surpass those of the DH.4), and the similarity to the DH.4, which meant that it would be easy to convert production over to the new aircraft, massive orders (4,630 aircraft) were placed.

 

The prototype (a converted DH.4) first flew at Hendon in July 1917. Unfortunately, the BHP engine proved unable to reliably deliver its expected power, with the engine being de-rated to 230 hp (186 kW) in order to improve reliability. This had a drastic effect on the aircraft's performance, especially at high altitude, with it being inferior to that of the DH.4 it was supposed to replace. This meant that the DH.9 would have to fight its way through enemy fighters, which could easily catch the DH.9 where the DH.4 could avoid many of these attacks.

 

While attempts were made to provide the DH.9 with an adequate engine, with aircraft being fitted with the Siddeley Puma, a lightened and supposedly more powerful version of the BHP, with the Fiat A12 engine and with a 430 hp (321 kW) Napier Lion engine, these were generally unsuccessful (although the Lion engined aircraft did set a World Altitude Record of 13,900 m on 2 January 1919) and it required redesign into the DH.9A to transform the aircraft.

Operational history

 

To boost the rate of production, quantity orders for the DH.9 were also placed with Alliance, G & J.Weir, Short Brothers, Vulcan, Waring & Gillow and National Aircraft Factories No. 1 and No. 2.

 

The first deliveries were made in November 1917 to 108 Squadron RFC and it first went into combat over France in March 1918 with 6 Squadron, and by July 1918 nine squadrons operational over the Western Front were using the type.

 

The DH.9's performance in action over the Western Front was a disaster, with heavy losses incurred, both due to its poor performance and to engine failures, despite the prior de-rating of its engine. Between May and November 1918, two squadrons on the Western Front (Nos. 99 and 104) lost 54 shot down, and another 94 written off in accidents. Nevertheless, on 23 August 1918 a DH9 flown by Lieutenant Arthur Rowe Spurling of 49 Squadron, with his observer, Sergeant Frank Bell, single-handedly attacked thirty Fokker D.VII fighters, downing five of them. Captain John Stevenson Stubbs managed 11 aerial victories in a DH9, including the highly unusual feat of balloon busting with one.

 

The DH.9 was also more successful against the Turkish forces in the Middle East, where they faced less opposition, and it was used extensively for coastal patrols, to try to deter the operations of U-boats.

 

Following the end of the First World War, DH.9s operated by 47 Squadron and 221 Squadron were sent to southern Russia in 1919 in support of the White Russian Army of General Denikin during the Russian Civil War. The last combat use by the RAF was in support of the final campaign against Mohammed Abdullah Hassan (known by the British as the "Mad Mullah") in Somalia during January-February 1920. Surprisingly, production was allowed to continue after the end of the war into 1919, with the DH.9 finally going out of service with the RAF in 1920.

 

Following the end of the First World War, large number of surplus DH.9s became available at low prices and the type was widely exported (including aircraft donated to Commonwealth nations as part of the Imperial Gift programme.

 

The South African Air Force received 48 DH.9s, and used them extensively, using them against the Rand Revolt in 1922. Several South African aircraft were re-engined with Bristol Jupiter radial engines as the M'pala, serving until 1937.

 

CIVILIAN USE

Because of the large number of surplus DH.9s available after the war many were used by air transport companies. They provided a useful load carrying capability and were cheap. Early air services between London, Paris and Amsterdam were operated by DH.9s owned by Aircraft Transport and Travel. A number of different conversions for civil use were carried out, both by Airco and its successor the de Havilland Aircraft Company and by other companies, such as the Aircraft Disposal Company. Some radial powered DH.9Js continued in use until 1936.

 

VARIANTS

- DH.9 - Revised version of the DH.4 with the pilot and observer/gunner placed closer together (3,024 production aircraft built with others built in Belgium and Spain).

- DH.9A - (also referred to as the Nine-Ack) was designed for Airco by Westland Aircraft to take advantage of the 400 hp (298 kW) American Liberty L-12 engine. Apart from the new engine and slightly larger wings it was identical to the DH.9. Initially it was hoped to quickly replace the DH.9 with the new version, but the shortage of Liberty engines available to the RAF limited the new type's service in the First World War, and it is best known as a standard type in the postwar RAF, serving as a general purpose aircraft for several years. 2,300 DH.9As were built by ten different British companies.

- DH.9B - Conversions for civilian use as three-seaters (one pilot and two passengers)

- DH.9C - Conversions for civilian use as four-seaters (one pilot and three passengers)

- DH.9J - Modernised and re-engined conversions using the 385 hp (287 kW) Armstrong Siddeley Jaguar III radial engine. Used by the De Havilland School of Flying.

- DH.9J M'pala I - Re-engined conversions carried out by the South African Air Force. Powered by a 450 hp (336 kW)

Bristol Jupiter VI radial piston engine.

- M'pala II - Re-engined conversions carried out by the South African Air Force, powered by a 480 hp (358 kW) Bristol Jupiter VIII radial piston engine.

- Mantis - Re-engined conversions carried out by the South African Air Force, powered by a 200 hp (149 kW) Wolseley Viper piston engine.

- Handley Page HP.17 - A DH.9 experimentally fitted with slotted wings

- USD-9/9A - DH.9s manufactured in the United States by the US Army's Engineering Division and Dayton-Wright. (1,415 ordered, only 4 built)

 

OPERATORS

MILITARY OPERATORS

- Afghanistan

Afghan Air Force - 18 aircraft, including 16 built by Duks Aircraft Works, acquired from 1924.

- Australia

Royal Australian Air Force - One used by the RAAF from 1920 to 1929.

No. 1 Flying Training School RAAF

- Belgium

Belgian Air Force - 18 aircraft.

- Canada

Canadian Air Force

- Bolivia

Bolivian Air Force

- Chile

Chilean Air Force - Received 20.

- Estonia

Estonian Air Force operated 13 from 1919 to 1933 .

- India

(Part of Imperial Gift)

- Greece

Royal Hellenic Naval Air Service[15]

- Kingdom of Hejaz

The Kingdom of Hejaz received 9 DH.9s and 2 DH.9Cs between 1921 and 1924. Five remained in existence (although not airworthy) in 1932.

- Ireland

Irish Air Service

Irish Air Corps

- Latvia

Latvian Air Force

- Netherlands

Royal Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force - operated 36, some of which were re-engined with Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine withdrawn in 1934.

- New Zealand

Royal New Zealand Air Force - Three Airco DH.9s in service with the New Zealand Permanent Air Force from 1923 to 1929 as advanced training aircraft.

- Paraguay

Paraguayan Air Force

- Peru

Peruvian Air Force

- Poland

Polish Air Force - 20 received in 1920, used during the Polish-Soviet war, until 1929.

- Romania

Royal Romanian Air Force

- Spain Kingdom of Spain

Spanish Air Force

- South Africa

South African Air Force - Part of the Imperial Gift. Some locally modified with Jupiter engines and named Mpala.

- Soviet Union

Soviet Air Force

- Switzerland

Swiss Air Force

- Turkey

Turkish Air Force - 4 aircraft, in service from 1921 to 1924.

- United Kingdom

Royal Flying Corps

Royal Naval Air Service

Royal Air Force

- United States

American Expeditionary Force

United States Marine Corps

- Uruguay

Uruguayan Air Force

 

CIVIL OPERATORS

- Australia

Qantas

- Belgium

Sabena

- Denmark

Det Danske Luftfartselskab

- Netherlands

KLM

- Romania

SNNA

- Spain Kingdom of Spain

Cia Espanola del Trafico Aereo

- United Kingdom

Aircraft Transport and Travel

Handley Page Transport

- Bikaner.svg Bikaner State

Maharaja Ganga Singh

 

SURVIVORS

Of the thousands of DH.9s built, only a few have survived to be preserved. F1258 is displayed at the Musée de l'Air et de l'Espace in Paris, with a second DH.9 being preserved at the South African National Museum of Military History, while G-EAQM, the first single-engined aircraft to fly from the United Kingdom to Australia is preserved in the Australian War Memorial at Canberra.

 

The remains of three DH.9s were discovered in India in 2000, one of which is displayed at the Imperial War Museum Duxford, and another in the process of being restored to flying condition.

 

SPECIFICATIONS (D.H.9 (Puma Engine))

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS

Crew: 2

Length: 9.27 m

Wingspan: 12.92 m

Height: 3.44 m

Wing area: 40.3 m²

Empty weight: 1,014 kg

Max. takeoff weight: 1,723 kg

Powerplant: 1 × Armstrong Siddeley Puma piston engine, 230 hp (172 kW)

 

PERFORMANCE

Maximum speed: 98 kn (182 km/h)

Endurance: 4½ hours

Service ceiling: 4,730 m

Climb to 10,000 ft: 18 min 30 sec

 

ARMAMENT

Guns: Forward firing Vickers machine gun and 1 or 2 × Rear Lewis guns on scarff ring

Bombs: Up to 209 kg bombs

 

WIKIPEDIA

The Airco DH.9 (from de Havilland 9) - also known after 1920 as the de Havilland DH.9 - was a British bomber used in the First World War. A single-engined biplane, it was a development of Airco's earlier, highly successful DH.4 and was ordered in very large numbers for Britain's Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force.

 

Its engine was unreliable, and failed to provide the expected power, giving the DH.9 poorer performance than the aircraft it was meant to replace, and resulting in heavy losses, particularly over the Western Front. The subsequently-developed DH.9A had a more powerful and reliable American Liberty L-12 engine.

 

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

The DH.9 was designed by de Havilland for the Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 1916 as a successor to the DH.4. It used the wings and tail unit of the DH.4 but had a new fuselage. This enabled the pilot to sit closer to the gunner/observer and away from the engine and fuel tank. The other major change from the DH.4 was the choice of the promising new BHP/Galloway Adriatic engine, which was predicted to produce 300 hp (224 kW) and so give the new aircraft an adequate performance to match enemy fighters.

 

By this time, as a result of attacks by German bombers on London, the decision was made to almost double the size of the Royal Flying Corps, with most of the new squadrons planned to be equipped with bombers. Based on the performance estimates for the DH.9 (which were expected to surpass those of the DH.4), and the similarity to the DH.4, which meant that it would be easy to convert production over to the new aircraft, massive orders (4,630 aircraft) were placed.

 

The prototype (a converted DH.4) first flew at Hendon in July 1917. Unfortunately, the BHP engine proved unable to reliably deliver its expected power, with the engine being de-rated to 230 hp (186 kW) in order to improve reliability. This had a drastic effect on the aircraft's performance, especially at high altitude, with it being inferior to that of the DH.4 it was supposed to replace. This meant that the DH.9 would have to fight its way through enemy fighters, which could easily catch the DH.9 where the DH.4 could avoid many of these attacks.

 

While attempts were made to provide the DH.9 with an adequate engine, with aircraft being fitted with the Siddeley Puma, a lightened and supposedly more powerful version of the BHP, with the Fiat A12 engine and with a 430 hp (321 kW) Napier Lion engine, these were generally unsuccessful (although the Lion engined aircraft did set a World Altitude Record of 13,900 m on 2 January 1919) and it required redesign into the DH.9A to transform the aircraft.

Operational history

 

To boost the rate of production, quantity orders for the DH.9 were also placed with Alliance, G & J.Weir, Short Brothers, Vulcan, Waring & Gillow and National Aircraft Factories No. 1 and No. 2.

 

The first deliveries were made in November 1917 to 108 Squadron RFC and it first went into combat over France in March 1918 with 6 Squadron, and by July 1918 nine squadrons operational over the Western Front were using the type.

 

The DH.9's performance in action over the Western Front was a disaster, with heavy losses incurred, both due to its poor performance and to engine failures, despite the prior de-rating of its engine. Between May and November 1918, two squadrons on the Western Front (Nos. 99 and 104) lost 54 shot down, and another 94 written off in accidents. Nevertheless, on 23 August 1918 a DH9 flown by Lieutenant Arthur Rowe Spurling of 49 Squadron, with his observer, Sergeant Frank Bell, single-handedly attacked thirty Fokker D.VII fighters, downing five of them. Captain John Stevenson Stubbs managed 11 aerial victories in a DH9, including the highly unusual feat of balloon busting with one.

 

The DH.9 was also more successful against the Turkish forces in the Middle East, where they faced less opposition, and it was used extensively for coastal patrols, to try to deter the operations of U-boats.

 

Following the end of the First World War, DH.9s operated by 47 Squadron and 221 Squadron were sent to southern Russia in 1919 in support of the White Russian Army of General Denikin during the Russian Civil War. The last combat use by the RAF was in support of the final campaign against Mohammed Abdullah Hassan (known by the British as the "Mad Mullah") in Somalia during January-February 1920. Surprisingly, production was allowed to continue after the end of the war into 1919, with the DH.9 finally going out of service with the RAF in 1920.

 

Following the end of the First World War, large number of surplus DH.9s became available at low prices and the type was widely exported (including aircraft donated to Commonwealth nations as part of the Imperial Gift programme.

 

The South African Air Force received 48 DH.9s, and used them extensively, using them against the Rand Revolt in 1922. Several South African aircraft were re-engined with Bristol Jupiter radial engines as the M'pala, serving until 1937.

 

CIVILIAN USE

Because of the large number of surplus DH.9s available after the war many were used by air transport companies. They provided a useful load carrying capability and were cheap. Early air services between London, Paris and Amsterdam were operated by DH.9s owned by Aircraft Transport and Travel. A number of different conversions for civil use were carried out, both by Airco and its successor the de Havilland Aircraft Company and by other companies, such as the Aircraft Disposal Company. Some radial powered DH.9Js continued in use until 1936.

 

VARIANTS

- DH.9 - Revised version of the DH.4 with the pilot and observer/gunner placed closer together (3,024 production aircraft built with others built in Belgium and Spain).

- DH.9A - (also referred to as the Nine-Ack) was designed for Airco by Westland Aircraft to take advantage of the 400 hp (298 kW) American Liberty L-12 engine. Apart from the new engine and slightly larger wings it was identical to the DH.9. Initially it was hoped to quickly replace the DH.9 with the new version, but the shortage of Liberty engines available to the RAF limited the new type's service in the First World War, and it is best known as a standard type in the postwar RAF, serving as a general purpose aircraft for several years. 2,300 DH.9As were built by ten different British companies.

- DH.9B - Conversions for civilian use as three-seaters (one pilot and two passengers)

- DH.9C - Conversions for civilian use as four-seaters (one pilot and three passengers)

- DH.9J - Modernised and re-engined conversions using the 385 hp (287 kW) Armstrong Siddeley Jaguar III radial engine. Used by the De Havilland School of Flying.

- DH.9J M'pala I - Re-engined conversions carried out by the South African Air Force. Powered by a 450 hp (336 kW)

Bristol Jupiter VI radial piston engine.

- M'pala II - Re-engined conversions carried out by the South African Air Force, powered by a 480 hp (358 kW) Bristol Jupiter VIII radial piston engine.

- Mantis - Re-engined conversions carried out by the South African Air Force, powered by a 200 hp (149 kW) Wolseley Viper piston engine.

- Handley Page HP.17 - A DH.9 experimentally fitted with slotted wings

- USD-9/9A - DH.9s manufactured in the United States by the US Army's Engineering Division and Dayton-Wright. (1,415 ordered, only 4 built)

 

OPERATORS

MILITARY OPERATORS

- Afghanistan

Afghan Air Force - 18 aircraft, including 16 built by Duks Aircraft Works, acquired from 1924.

- Australia

Royal Australian Air Force - One used by the RAAF from 1920 to 1929.

No. 1 Flying Training School RAAF

- Belgium

Belgian Air Force - 18 aircraft.

- Canada

Canadian Air Force

- Bolivia

Bolivian Air Force

- Chile

Chilean Air Force - Received 20.

- Estonia

Estonian Air Force operated 13 from 1919 to 1933 .

- India

(Part of Imperial Gift)

- Greece

Royal Hellenic Naval Air Service[15]

- Kingdom of Hejaz

The Kingdom of Hejaz received 9 DH.9s and 2 DH.9Cs between 1921 and 1924. Five remained in existence (although not airworthy) in 1932.

- Ireland

Irish Air Service

Irish Air Corps

- Latvia

Latvian Air Force

- Netherlands

Royal Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force - operated 36, some of which were re-engined with Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine withdrawn in 1934.

- New Zealand

Royal New Zealand Air Force - Three Airco DH.9s in service with the New Zealand Permanent Air Force from 1923 to 1929 as advanced training aircraft.

- Paraguay

Paraguayan Air Force

- Peru

Peruvian Air Force

- Poland

Polish Air Force - 20 received in 1920, used during the Polish-Soviet war, until 1929.

- Romania

Royal Romanian Air Force

- Spain Kingdom of Spain

Spanish Air Force

- South Africa

South African Air Force - Part of the Imperial Gift. Some locally modified with Jupiter engines and named Mpala.

- Soviet Union

Soviet Air Force

- Switzerland

Swiss Air Force

- Turkey

Turkish Air Force - 4 aircraft, in service from 1921 to 1924.

- United Kingdom

Royal Flying Corps

Royal Naval Air Service

Royal Air Force

- United States

American Expeditionary Force

United States Marine Corps

- Uruguay

Uruguayan Air Force

 

CIVIL OPERATORS

- Australia

Qantas

- Belgium

Sabena

- Denmark

Det Danske Luftfartselskab

- Netherlands

KLM

- Romania

SNNA

- Spain Kingdom of Spain

Cia Espanola del Trafico Aereo

- United Kingdom

Aircraft Transport and Travel

Handley Page Transport

- Bikaner.svg Bikaner State

Maharaja Ganga Singh

 

SURVIVORS

Of the thousands of DH.9s built, only a few have survived to be preserved. F1258 is displayed at the Musée de l'Air et de l'Espace in Paris, with a second DH.9 being preserved at the South African National Museum of Military History, while G-EAQM, the first single-engined aircraft to fly from the United Kingdom to Australia is preserved in the Australian War Memorial at Canberra.

 

The remains of three DH.9s were discovered in India in 2000, one of which is displayed at the Imperial War Museum Duxford, and another in the process of being restored to flying condition.

 

SPECIFICATIONS (D.H.9 (Puma Engine))

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS

Crew: 2

Length: 9.27 m

Wingspan: 12.92 m

Height: 3.44 m

Wing area: 40.3 m²

Empty weight: 1,014 kg

Max. takeoff weight: 1,723 kg

Powerplant: 1 × Armstrong Siddeley Puma piston engine, 230 hp (172 kW)

 

PERFORMANCE

Maximum speed: 98 kn (182 km/h)

Endurance: 4½ hours

Service ceiling: 4,730 m

Climb to 10,000 ft: 18 min 30 sec

 

ARMAMENT

Guns: Forward firing Vickers machine gun and 1 or 2 × Rear Lewis guns on scarff ring

Bombs: Up to 209 kg bombs

 

WIKIPEDIA

Nikon F5 + Nikon 24 f2.8

Fujifilm eterna vivid 160

El rastro de un Boeing 777 de Alitalia y de un Airbus A320 de Vueling.

 

Con el aro de enfoque con control electrónico "focus by wire" del pequeño telezoom SEL 55-210 de Sony se puede hacer un enfoque manual a infinito muy preciso ya que aparece una escala de distancias en el visor que resulta ser muy fiable.

 

También se puede hacer foco en las estrellas ampliando en enfoque manual, pero al subir ISO aparecen puntos de luz intermitentes y aleatorios en la pantalla que molestan un poco.

Durante la Crisis de los controladores aéreos en España en 2010.

Gracias por el buen comienzo de las vacaciones... ¬¬

 

Se conoce bajo el nombre de crisis de los controladores aéreos en España a una serie de eventos que condujeron al cierre total del espacio aéreo en el territorio español durante los días 3 y 4 de diciembre de 2010. Estos eventos dieron comienzo en la noche del 28 de noviembre de 2010 cuando se debieron realizar cierres parciales del espacio aéreo gallego por la inasistencia al trabajo de 10 de los 28 controladores aéreos que argumentaban haber cumplido todas las horas de trabajo computables a su jornada anual. A pesar de que se advirtió a los mismos de que serían expedientados, el 2 de diciembre, un día antes del Consejo de Ministros ordinario que iba a ratificar la jornada laboral, volvieron a faltar controladores en el aeropuerto de Santiago de Compostela, que repitieron sus argumentos. Los controladores de toda España amenazaron con continuar en una escalada sin acudir al trabajo en distintos aeropuertos con el mismo argumento. El ministro de Fomento presentó en el Consejo de Ministros del 3 de diciembre el decreto que efectuaba el cómputo de horas y que se aprobó mediante decreto-ley, al tiempo que entre el 70 y el 90% de los controladores aéreos abandonó sus puestos de trabajo desde las 17:00 horas del mismo día alegando para ello que, en virtud de la Ley de Navegación Aérea, no se encontraban en condiciones psicofísicas para trabajar. Ante la situación, el Gobierno, mediante decreto firmado por el ministro de la Presidencia Ramón Jáuregui, y sancionado por el Rey Juan Carlos I, ordenó a las 22:45 horas la militarización del espacio aéreo y que efectivos del Ejército del Aire tomaran bajo su mando los centros de control de tráfico aéreo y las torres de los principales aeropuertos civiles. El 4 de diciembre, en Consejo de Ministros extraordinario se declaró el estado de alarma por un espacio de quince días, el máximo contemplado por la Constitución, siendo la primera vez que sucedía esto en España desde el restablecimiento de la democracia.

 

La acción de los controladores aéreos se produjo el día en que el país iniciaba un significativo periodo vacacional que empezaba en esa misma tarde del día 3 de diciembre hasta el día 8 del mismo mes. Según fuentes del Ministerio de Fomento alrededor de 300.000 pasajeros se encontraban afectados por la acción de los controladores el día 3 de diciembre, cifra que alcanzó a unos 630.000 al día siguiente. Los aeropuertos comenzaron a paralizarse a media tarde, debiendo cerrar su espacio aéreo varios de ellos, entre los más destacables los de Madrid-Barajas, Barcelona y Palma de Mallorca. Conforme avanzaba la noche la red de Eurocontrol comunicó que, prácticamente, quedaba cerrado todo el espacio aéreo español hasta las 16:00 horas del 4 de diciembre.

 

Mas Info: es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crisis_de_los_controladores_a%C3%A9...

 

-------------------------------------->

 

During the Spanish air traffic controllers strike in 2010.

Thanks for the nice trip... ¬¬

 

The Spanish air traffic controllers strike began on December 3, 2010 when most air traffic controllers in Spanish airports walked out in a coordinated wildcat strike. Following the walkout, the Spanish Government authorized the Spanish military to take over air traffic control operations in a total of eight airports, including the country's two main airports, Madrid-Barajas and Barcelona-El Prat. On the morning of December 4, the government declared a 'State of Alert', ordering on the controllers back to work. Shortly after the measure was implemented, controllers started returning to work and the strike was called off.

 

The move by controllers came after a year of dispute with the government and the Spanish airport authority Aena over working conditions, work schedules and benefits. According to some sources, air traffic controllers can earn up to 350,000 euros per annum, a claim that has been hotly disputed. This has meant that the controllers have not received much sympathy for their strike in Spain. On the same day as the strike, the Spanish Council of Ministers approved plans to partially privatise Aena.

 

The use of emergency powers was the first time since the restoration of democracy in 1975 that a state of alert had been called. Under the measure, controllers were escorted by armed guards and faced arrest for the crime of disobedience, stipulated in the Spanish military penal code in case of not showing up at work. Some controllers reported to have been forced to work at gunpoint.

 

The use of this measure by the Spanish government has been severely criticized by ATCEUC (Air Traffic Controllers European Unions Coordination) through a press release.

 

More Info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_air_traffic_controllers_strike

 

-------------------------------------->

 

Photo: Iryna Litvin ( My Mom )

Model & Editing: Oleg Valentinovich Litvin

 

Shot with Canon, Edited in Photoshop CS5.

 

-------------------------------------->

 

Oleg Litvin

Dead Planet Studios

www.facebook.com/oleglitvin

www.facebook.com/olegvalentinovichlitvin

www.facebook.com/deadplanet

www.facebook.com/deadplanetstudios

www.vimeo.com/oleglitvin

www.youtube.com/deadplanetstudios

Una imagen de Gallocanta el pasado diciembre. Los cielos se llenan de bandos de grullas que van y vienen. Los bandos que llegan en migración a gran altura y en rápido descenso se mezclan visualmente con los vuelos cortos de pequeños grupos que se mueven por los campos. La impresión óptica es la de Barajas en hora punta. Me gustó captarlo.

Cervera de Buitrago, Madrid

Bitte respektiere mein Copyright. Keine Verwendung des Fotos ohne meine ausdrückliche Genehmigung.

Please respect my copyright. No use of the photo without my expressly permission.

Por favor, respete mis derechos de autor. Ningún uso de la foto sin mi permiso explícito.

Valencia, Ciutat de les arts i les ciències - l'Hemisferic, el Museo de le cièncie Principe Felipe (Calatrava).

Islamorada, Florida, USA

 

TRÁFICO AÉREO MUNDIAL

Nuevo post en mi Blog

New post in my Blog

www.jlopezsaguar.com/index.php?option=com_wordpress&I...

 

www.jlopezsaguar.com

Please, do not use this photo without permission

Por Favor no usar esta fotografía sin permiso

Circumpolar en Markinez.

Lastima de trafico aéreo.

I should change my user name to "early morning photography"!

 

Another Run'ography shot, South Pasadena, California

Con parón incluido de unos 2 minutos por culpa del tráfico aereo...Pensaba que quedaría mejor...

With the return of the sunny days, the super sailboat A dropped anchor off Cannes. Tour of the owner of the world's largest sailing yacht.

It's hard not to notice that he's back.

1. it is held by a Russian billionaire

The super sailboat A is in the possession of the Russian billionaire Andrei Melnichenko, 46 years old, 88th in the world. Its wealth is estimated at $13.8 billion in May 2018, says Forbes.

The Russian had the villa Altaïr built on Cape Antibes.

2. His name is motivated by a whim

The letter "A" would not refer to the first name of the oligarch's wife, Aleksandra, a Serbo-Croat model married during a wonderful celebration in Cap d'Antibes.

Rather at a whim: to appear in first place in the international maritime registers. Yes, yes, really.

3. its characteristics are staggering

This three-masted mast is 142.81 metres long, nearly 25 metres wide, and weighs 12,700 tonnes.

The central mast rises to a hundred metres above sea level, larger than Big Ben, more than twice the size of the Statue of Liberty.

When sailing in certain areas, particularly near international airports such as Nice, the yacht is so high that it must notify air traffic control to avoid any accident.

4. Its interior is just as impressive

Some twenty cars are spread over eight decks connected by a battery of elevators. In all, 54 crew members are busy for a small dozen guests.

The yacht includes gyms and a spa with a swimming pool. Garages are provided for the annexes and for the on-board submarine. At the bow, a heliport is used to transport VIPs.

An 18m² underwater observation room is installed in the keel equipped with three large elliptical portholes. The weight of the glass has been reduced by 50% thanks to revolutionary techniques.

5. It costs the modest sum of 417 million euros

It is rumoured that the "Sailing Yacht A" cost a mere €417 million.

Many estimates are circulating, some exceeding half a billion euros.

6. He is the big brother of the mega yacht A

The "sailing yacht" is the big brother of the mega yacht A, which also belongs to the billionaire.

Like him, the sailboat was designed by designer Philippe Starck and has an inverted bow.

7. it is customary on the Côte d'Azur

The super sailboat A is a regular on the French Riviera.

It has already been moored off Monaco.

 

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Avec le retour des beaux jours, le super voilier A a jeté l'ancre au large de Cannes. Tour du propriétaire du plus grand yacht à voile du monde.

Difficile de ne pas remarquer qu'il est de retour.

1. il est Détenu par un milliardaire russe

Le super voilier A est en la possession du milliardaire russe Andreï Melnitchenko, 46 ans, 88e fortune mondiale. Sa richesse est estimée à 13,8 milliards de dollars en mai 2018, indique Forbes.

Le russe a d'ailleurs fait construire la villa Altaïr au cap Antibes.

2. Son nom est motivé par un caprice

La lettre "A" ne se référerait pas au prénom de la femme de l'oligarque, Aleksandra, mannequin serbo-croate épousé lors d'une mirifique fête au Cap d'Antibes.

Plutôt à un caprice: apparaître en première place des registres maritimes internationaux. Oui oui, vraiment.

3. ses caractéristiques sont ahurissantes

Ce trois-mâts mesure 142,81 mètres de long, près de 25 mètres de large, pour 12.700 tonnes.

Le mât central culmine à cent mètres au-dessus du niveau de la mer, plus grand que Big Ben, plus du double de la statue de la Liberté.

Lorsqu'il navigue dans certaines zones, notamment à proximité des aéroports internationaux comme celui de Nice, le yacht est si haut qu'il doit aviser le contrôle aérien pour éviter tout accident.

4. Son intérieur est tout aussi impressionnant

Une vingtaine de cabines sont réparties sur huit ponts reliés par une batterie d'ascenseurs. En tout, 54 membres d'équipage s'activent pour une petite douzaine d'invités.

Le yacht comprend des salles de gym et un spa avec piscine. Des garages sont prévus pour les annexes et pour le sous-marin embarqué. À la proue, un héliport permet d'acheminer les VIP.

Une salle d'observation sous-marine de 18m² est installée dans la quille équipée de trois grands hublots elliptiques. Le poids du verre a été réduit de 50% grâce à des techniques révolutionnaires.

5. Il coûte la modique somme de 417 millions d'euros

Il se murmure que le "Sailing Yacht A" a coûté la bagatelle de… 417 millions d'euros.

De nombreuses estimations circulent, certaines dépassant le demi-milliard d'euros.

6. Il est le grand frère du méga yacht A

Le "sailing yacht" est le grand frère du méga yacht A, qui appartient également au milliardaire.

Tout comme lui, le voilier a été dessiné par le designer Philippe Starck et arbore une étrave inversée.

7. il est coutumier de la côte d'azur

Le super voilier A est un habitué de la Côte d'Azur.

Il a déjà été amarré au large de Monaco pour quelques jours en mai 2017.

 

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Con el regreso de los días soleados, el super velero A ancló en Cannes. Tour del propietario del velero más grande del mundo.

Es difícil no darse cuenta de que ha vuelto.

1. está en manos de un multimillonario ruso

El super velero A está en posesión del multimillonario ruso Andrei Melnichenko, de 46 años y 88º en el mundo. Su riqueza se estima en 13.800 millones de dólares en mayo de 2018, dice Forbes.

El ruso mandó construir la villa Altaïr en el cabo de Antibes.

2. Su nombre está motivado por un capricho

La letra "A" no hace referencia al nombre de pila de la esposa del oligarca, Aleksandra, una modelo serbocroata casada durante una maravillosa celebración en el Cap d'Antibes.

Más bien por capricho: figurar en primer lugar en los registros marítimos internacionales. Sí, sí, de verdad.

3. sus características son asombrosas

Este mástil de tres mástiles tiene 142,81 metros de largo, casi 25 metros de ancho y un peso de 12.700 toneladas.

El mástil central se eleva a cien metros sobre el nivel del mar, más grande que el Big Ben, más del doble del tamaño de la Estatua de la Libertad.

Cuando se navega en ciertas zonas, especialmente cerca de aeropuertos internacionales como Niza, el yate es tan alto que debe notificar al control de tráfico aéreo para evitar cualquier accidente.

4. Su interior es igual de impresionante

Una veintena de coches están repartidos en ocho cubiertas conectadas por una batería de ascensores. En total, 54 tripulantes están ocupados para una pequeña docena de invitados.

El yate incluye gimnasios y un spa con piscina. Hay garajes para los anexos y para el submarino de a bordo. En la proa, se utiliza un helipuerto para transportar a los VIP.

Una sala de observación submarina de 18 m² está instalada en la quilla equipada con tres grandes portillos elípticos. El peso del vidrio se ha reducido en un 50% gracias a técnicas revolucionarias.

5. Cuesta la modesta suma de 417 millones de euros

Se rumorea que el "Sailing Yacht A" costó sólo 417 millones de euros.

Están circulando muchas estimaciones, algunas de las cuales superan los 500 millones de euros.

6. Es el hermano mayor del mega yate A.

El "velero" es el hermano mayor del megayate A, que también pertenece al multimillonario.

Como él, el velero fue diseñado por el diseñador Philippe Starck y tiene un arco invertido.

7. es habitual en la Costa Azul

El super velero A es un asiduo en la Riviera Francesa.

Ya ha sido amarrado frente a Mónaco.

  

© pacoespinoza • photography

 

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Ya se, mucho tráfico aéreo, pero había que conformarse...............

Miami Beach, Florida, USA

 

TRÁFICO AÉREO MUNDIAL

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Please, do not use this photo without permission

Por Favor no usar esta fotografía sin permiso

..... desde el cerro del Socorro (Cuenca)

 

80 tomas de 20 segundos unidas con Startrails, mucha luz, muchas dominantes distintas, mucho trafico aéreo, mucho frió.......... :)

 

Cámara: Nikon D300

Exposición: 20 sec * 80 tomas

Aperture: f/2.8

Lente: 11 mm

Velocidad ISO: 200

¡¡A ver si miras por donde vas!!.

Eso es lo que parece decirle el alcatraz a la gaviota.

 

Mi blog: vipucholfoto.blogspot.com.es/

Tráfico aéreo en hora punta.

Tráfico aéreo en san Pedro de Latarce

  

www.danimantisfoto.com

   

DERECHOS DE AUTOR:

Todas las fotografias de este sitio, estan protegidas por el real Decreto Legislativo 1/1996, de 12 de abril, por el que se aprueba el texto Refundido de la LEY DE PROPIEDAD INTELECTUAL. Queda totalmente prohibida su reproducción total o parcial sin el expreso consentimento de su autor. Si estás interesado en adquirir alguna copia, o los derechos de reproducción de alguna de las fotografias aqui publicadas, contacta con el autor. Si la finalidad de las fotografias deseadas no es con fines lucrativos, igualmente debes contactar con el autor indicando el uso que se dará a las imagenes.

 

COPYRIGHT:

All photographs on this site are protected by Royal Decree Law 1 / 1996 of 12 April, approving the revised text of the Copyright Law. It is strictly forbidden to reproduce in whole or in part without the express consent from the author. If you are interested in purchasing any copy or reproduction rights for any of the photographs published here, please contact the author. If the desired purpose of the photographs is not for profit, you should also contact the author indicating the use which will be the images.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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Prise avec un telephone Nokia !!!!!!!!!!!

Tomada con un telefono NOkia !!!!!!!!!!

Aeropuerto Internacional El Dorado - El Dorado International Airport. SKBO - BOG.

04-jul-2015.

 

Taken from Avianca Flight - Vuelo AV8574 from BOG to BAQ. 04-jul-2015. Airbus A320 Reg. N664AV.

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