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Wiki - Meganebashi (眼鏡橋) or Spectacles Bridge, over the Nakashima River (中島川) was built in Nagasaki in 1634 by the Japanese monk Mokusu of Kofukuji Temple. It is said to be the oldest stone arch bridge in Japan and has been designated as an Important Cultural Property. It received the nickname "Spectacles Bridge" because its two arches and their reflection in the water create the image of a pair of spectacles. On July 23, 1982, a disastrous deluge washed away six of the ten stone bridges over the Nakashima River. Meganebashi was badly damaged but fortunately almost all the original stones were retrieved and the bridge was restored to its original appearance.

 

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Skeldergate Bridge links the York Castle area to Bishophill. It was designed in a Gothic Revival style by civil engineer George Gordon Page, and built between 1878 and 1881. The small arch at the east end has an opening portion, powered by machinery in the Motor House, which also served as a toll house and accommodation for the toll keeper and his family. The bridge opened to admit tall masted ships to the quays on either side of the river between Skeldergate and Ouse Bridges. Skeldergate Bridge was formally declared free of tolls on 1 April 1914.

Wiki

 

Grasmere is one of the smaller lakes of the English Lake District, in the county of Cumbria. It gives its name to the village of Grasmere, famously associated with the poet William Wordsworth, which lies immediately to the north of the lake.

  

The lake is 1680 yd (1540 m) long and 700 yd (640 m) wide, covering an area of 0.24 mi² (0.62 km²). It has a maximum depth of 70 ft (21m) and an elevation above sea level of 208 ft (62 m). The lake is both fed and drained by the River Rothay, which flows through the village before entering the lake, and then exits downstream into nearby Rydal Water, beyond which it continues into Windermere.

  

The lake contains a single island, known as The Island. In 2017 this island was bequeathed to the National Trust. This gift has particular significance to the National Trust, as the organisation was founded in response to the sale of the same island to a private bidder in 1893. Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley felt that such a location should instead be in public ownership, and soon afterwards started the National Trust with Octavia Hill and Robert Hunter.

Wiki

Loughrigg Tarn is a small, natural lake in the Lake District, Cumbria, England. It is situated north of Windermere, just north of the village of Skelwith Bridge, and at the foot of Loughrigg Fell. "Loughrigg Tarn" is a bit of a tautology, since "loughrigg" means "ridge of the lough (lake)" and "tarn" is also the name of a body of water.

  

Loughrigg Tarn was a favoured place of William Wordsworth, who, in his Epistle to Sir George Howland Beaumont Bart, likened it to “Diana’s Looking-glass... round, clear and bright as heaven," in reference to Lake Nemi, the mirror of Diana in Rome

   

Wiki

 

The Kelpies are 30-metre-high horse-head sculptures, standing next to the Forth and Clyde Canal, and near River Carron, in The Helix, a new parkland project built to connect 16 communities in the Falkirk Council Area, Scotland.[1] The sculptures were designed by sculptor Andy Scott and were completed in October 2013.[2] The sculptures form a gateway at the eastern entrance to the Forth and Clyde canal, The Kelpies are a monument to horse powered heritage across Scotland.[3]

 

The sculptures opened to the public in April 2014.

Wiki

 

Le Mont-Saint-Michel is an island commune in Normandy, France. It is located about one kilometre (0.6 miles) off the country's northwestern coast, at the mouth of the Couesnon River near Avranches and is 100 hectares (247 acres) in size. As of 2009, the island has a population of 44.[1]

 

The island has held strategic fortifications since ancient times and since the 8th century AD has been the seat of the monastery from which it draws its name. The structural composition of the town exemplifies the feudal society that constructed it: on top, God, the abbey and monastery; below, the great halls; then stores and housing; and at the bottom, outside the walls, houses for fishermen and farmers.

 

Its unique position — on an island just 600 metres from land — made it accessible at low tide to the many pilgrims to its abbey, but defensible as an incoming tide stranded, drove off, or drowned would-be assailants. The Mont remained unconquered during the Hundred Years' War; a small garrison fended off a full attack by the English in 1433.[2] The reverse benefits of its natural defence were not lost on Louis XI, who turned the Mont into a prison. Thereafter the abbey began to be used more regularly as a jail during the Ancien Régime.

Wiki - Kinkaku-ji (金閣寺, lit. "Temple of the Golden Pavilion"), officially named Rokuon-ji (鹿苑寺, lit. "Deer Garden Temple"), is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. The Golden Pavilion (金閣 Kinkaku) is a three-story building on the grounds of the Rokuon-ji temple complex. The top two stories of the pavilion are covered with pure gold leaf. The pavilion functions as a shariden (舎利殿), housing relics of the Buddha (Buddha's Ashes).

 

The Golden Pavilion is set in a magnificent Japanese strolling garden (回遊式庭園 kaiyū-shiki-teien, lit. a landscape garden in the go-round style). The location implements the idea of borrowing of scenery ("shakkei") that integrates the outside and the inside, creating an extension of the views surrounding the pavilion and connecting it with the outside world. The pavilion extends over a pond, called Kyōko-chi (鏡湖池 Mirror Pond), that reflects the building. The pond contains 10 smaller islands. The zen typology is seen through the rock composition, the bridges, and plants are arranged in a specific way to represent famous places in Chinese and Japanese literature.

 

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Wiki - The Arctic Cathedral, formally known as Tromsdalen Church or Tromsøysund Church (Norwegian: Tromsdalen kirke or Tromsøysund kirke), is a church in the city of Tromsø in Troms county, Norway. The church is commonly nicknamed the Ishavskatedralen, literally "The Cathedral of the Arctic Sea" or "Arctic Cathedral". The church was built in 1965 in the Tromsdalen valley and it is a parish church and not, in fact, a cathedral as it is commonly called. The church is part of the Tromsøysund parish in the Tromsø arch-deanery in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland.

 

The church was designed by the architect Jan Inge Hovig and is built mainly of concrete. The main contractor for the construction was Ing. F. Selmer A/S Tromsø.[3] Because of the church's distinct look and situation, it has often been called "the opera house of Norway", likening it to the famous Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia.

 

All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce, copy, edit, publish, transmit or upload material in my gallery without my permission.

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Loughrigg Tarn is a small, natural lake in the Lake District, Cumbria, England. It is situated north of Windermere, just north of the village of Skelwith Bridge, and at the foot of Loughrigg Fell. "Loughrigg Tarn" is a bit of a tautology, since "loughrigg" means "ridge of the lough (lake)" and "tarn" is also the name of a body of water.

 

Loughrigg Tarn was a favoured place of William Wordsworth, who, in his Epistle to Sir George Howland Beaumont Bart, likened it to “Diana’s Looking-glass... round, clear and bright as heaven," in reference to Lake Nemi, the mirror of Diana in Rome

de/from Wikipedia:

es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patio_de_los_Arrayanes

 

El patio de los Arrayanes es el gran patio escenográfico perteneciente al Palacio de Comares de la Alhambra, situado en su centro, al este del patio del Cuarto Dorado y al oeste de la sala de Baños y patio de los Leones. A su alrededor se articulan una serie de estancias siendo las más importantes las destinadas a cuarto de trabajo del sultán (diwan) o sala del trono y de audiencias (situadas al norte del patio). El patio es rectangular de dimensiones bastante considerables y con un estanque o alberca en el centro rodeado de plantaciones de arrayanes (o mirtos). Se le conoce también con los nombres de patio de los Mirtos, patio de la Alberca y patio de Comares.​

 

En el centro se encuentra el estanque que mide 34 metros por 7,10 metros; se abastece de agua por medio de dos pilas de mármol situadas en cada extremo. Está enmarcado por unos pasillos pavimentados en mármol blanco, delimitados a su vez por la plantación de los mirtos o arrayanes bien recortados que forman como un seto, de un verde brillante que contrasta con el mármol y con el agua.nota 1​ Alrededor del estanque y los mirtos y por sus cuatro costados, hay un gran espacio que constituye el patio propiamente dicho, cuyo suelo es también de mármol blanco. En su origen estaba adornado también por naranjos silvestres​ de fruto amargo, según la descripción hecha por el embajador veneciano Andrea Navagiero que hizo una visita a la Alhambra en el siglo XVI.

 

El patio fue restaurado en el siglo XIX como tantos otros sitios de la Alhambra. El restaurador principal fue el académico arquitecto Rafael Contreras Muñoz (1826-1890). Uno de los cambios más espectaculares consistió en levantar el pavimento que estaba enlosado con lápidas procedentes de cementerios musulmanes, sustituyéndolas por un enlosado de mármol.

 

Al muro norte se abre primero una galería o pórtico abierto en cuyo centro hay una pequeña cúpula. En los extremos hay unas alcobas que se supone fueran de tertulia mientras esperaban la audiencia del sultán. En las paredes y por encima del zócalo de azulejos se escribieron poesías de Ibn Zamrak, ministro de Muhammad V, en alabanza de este sultán. Hay también dos nichos o tacas, esculpidos en mármol y adornados con azulejos, donde se colocaban jarrones con flores o lámparas de aceite. A lo largo de la galería hay un zócalo de azulejos realizados por Antonio Tenorio y el morisco Gaspar Hernández entre 1587 y 1599.

 

La galería del muro sur está compuesta por tres arcos iguales y uno central más elevado. La recorre un zócalo de azulejos. Esta galería también recibe a sus visitantes con una leyenda:

"La ayuda y la protección de Dios y una victoria espléndida para nuestro Señor Abu Abd' Allah, emir de los musulmanes."

 

No se tiene mucha noticia sobre las dependencias que había en este lado. Fueron destruidas parcialmente para la construcción del palacio de Carlos V en el siglo XVI. Por encima de esta galería hay un corredor y sobre éste otra galería de seis arcos iguales y otro con dintel y zapatas de madera en el centro. Las celosías son del siglo XIX.

 

En el lado este del patio se abren distintas puertas que conducen a estancias privadas del sultán y su corte.

 

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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Court_of_the_Myrtles

 

The Court of the Myrtles (Patio de los Arrayanes) is part of the palace and fortress complex of the Alhambra. It is located east of the Gilded Room (Cuarto Dorado) and west of the Patio of the Lions and the Baths. Its current name is due to the myrtle bushes that surround the central pond and the bright green colour of which contrasts with the white marble of the patio. It was also called the Patio of the Pond or the Reservoir (Patio del Estanque o de la Alberca) because of the central pond, which is 34 metres long and 7,10 meters wide. The patio is divided in two sides by the pond, which receives its water from two fountains. The space has chambers and porticoes around it. These porticoes rest on columns with cubic capitals, which have seven semicircular arches decorated with fretwork rhombuses and inscriptions praising God. The central arch is greater than the other six and has solid scallops decorated with stylised vegetal forms and capitals of Mocárabes.

 

The most important chambers that surround the Patio are the ones in the north side, which are part of the Comares Palace, the official residence of the King.

 

Comares Palace

 

The name of the Palace, Comares, has led to various etymological research. For instance, Diego de Guadix wrote a dictionary about Arabic words in which it is said that Comares originally comes from cun and ari. The first term means stand up and the second one look, in other words it would have meant Stand up and look around or possibly Open your eyes and see, which is a way of referring the beauty of the place.

 

In the sixteenth century, a historian from Granada called Luis de Mármol Carvajal claimed that the term Comares derived from the word Comaraxía, that actually has a meaning related to a craftsmanship labor very appreciated by Muslims: a manufacturing technique of glass for exterior and ceilings.

 

A third suggested theory is that the name comes from the Arab word qumariyya or qamariyya. These ones designate the stained glasses that can even be glimpsed from the Hall of the Ambassadors' balcony.

 

There's another possibility that says that Qumarish is the name of a region in the North of Africa where most craftsmen came from, in other words, the place might be called Comares in honour of the people who worked there.

   

Wiki:

Skopje is the capital and largest city of North Macedonia. It is the country's political, cultural, economic, and academic centre.

Wiki:

Milford Sound / Piopiotahi is a fiord in the south west of New Zealand's South Island, within Fiordland National Park, Piopiotahi (Milford Sound) Marine Reserve, and the Te Wahipounamu World Heritage site.

 

Mitre Peak (centre) rises 1,692 m (5,551 ft) above the sound.

 

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Sorry for my unactivity, I'm busy at the moment.

Per Wiki... Jay Cooke is noted for its Rustic Style historical structures. These structures were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps between 1933 and 1942. All the major landmarks in Jay Cooke are built with local basalt or gabbro stone and dark planks and logs. Most famous of all landmarks is the swinging bridge, which is one of only two suspension bridges in any Minnesota state park. The bridge was designed by Oscar Newstrom. It runs 200 feet (61 m) long, 126 feet (38 m) of which run over the river itself. It is supported by two large concrete pylons also faced with gabbro. The bank of the river near the River Inn is too steep to walk along, so anyone who wishes to hike the length of the river generally must cross this bridge.

 

In the major floods of June 20, 2012, the swinging bridge was severely damaged. According to an early report from the Pine Journal, at least one stone pillar and half of another were washed away, and the bridge decking was "twisted and mangled."

WIKI:

Mostar (Bosnian pronunciation: [mǒstaːr]) is a city and municipality in southern Bosnia and Herzegovina. Inhabited by 105,797 people, it is the most important city in the Herzegovina region, its cultural capital, and the center of the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton of the Federation. Mostar is situated on the Neretva River and is the fifth-largest city in the country. Mostar was named after the bridge keepers (mostari) who in the medieval times guarded the Stari Most (Old Bridge) over the Neretva. The Old Bridge, built by the Ottomans in the 16th century, is one of Bosnia and Herzegovina's most recognizable landmarks, and is considered one of the most exemplary pieces of Islamic architecture in the Balkans.

Wiki:

Split is the second-largest city of Croatia and the largest city of the region of Dalmatia, with about 300,000 people living in its urban area. It lies on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea and is spread over a central peninsula and its surroundings. Home to Diocletian's Palace, built for the Roman emperor in AD 305, the city was founded as the Greek colony of Aspálathos in the 3rd or 2nd century BC.

 

In the view you see "Historical Complex of Split with the Palace of Diocletian", a Unesco world heritage site.

 

I'm on the road, but Armin has kindly edited

www.flickr.com/photos/46190123@N02

Wiki:

Pura Taman Ayun is a compound of Balinese temple and garden with water features located in Mengwi district in Badung Regency, Bali, Indonesia. The temple garden was featured on the television program Around the World in 80 Gardens.

Wiki:

Sevanavank (Armenian: Սևանավանք; meaning Sevan Monastery) is a monastic complex located on a peninsula at the northwestern shore of Lake Sevan in the Gegharkunik Province of Armenia, not far from the town of Sevan. Initially the monastery was built at the southern shore of a small island. After the artificial draining of Lake Sevan, which started in the era of Joseph Stalin, the water level fell about 20 metres, and the island transformed into a peninsula. At the southern shore of this newly created peninsula, a guesthouse of the Armenian Writers' Union was built. The eastern shore is occupied by the Armenian president's summer residence, while the monastery's still active seminary moved to newly constructed buildings at the northern shore of the peninsula.

 

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Thank you for the edit, Armin!

www.flickr.com/photos/46190123@N02

 

Wiki

 

The coppersmith barbet, crimson-breasted barbet or coppersmith (Psilopogon haemacephalus), is a bird with crimson forehead and throat which is best known for its metronomic call that has been likened to a coppersmith striking metal with a hammer. It is a resident found in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia. Like other barbets, they chisel out a hole inside a tree to build their nest. They are mainly fruit eating but will take sometimes insects, especially winged termites.

  

Wiki:

Borobudur, or Barabudur (Indonesian: Candi Borobudur) is a 9th-century Mahayana Buddhist temple in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia, as well as the world's largest Buddhist temple, and also one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world. The temple consists of nine stacked platforms, six square and three circular, topped by a central dome. The temple is decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues. The central dome is surrounded by 72 Buddha statues, each seated inside a perforated stupa.

Wiki:

The Cathedral of the Dormition, or the Kutaisi Cathedral, more commonly known as Bagrati Cathedral, is an 11th-century cathedral in the city of Kutaisi, in the Imereti region of Georgia. A masterpiece of the medieval Georgian architecture, the cathedral suffered heavy damage throughout centuries and was reconstructed to its present state through a gradual process starting in the 1950s, with major conservation works concluding in 2012. A distinct landmark in the scenery of central Kutaisi, the cathedral rests on the Ukimerioni Hill.

 

In 1994 Bagrati Cathedral, together with the Gelati Monastery, was included in UNESCO's World Heritage Site list as a single entity. UNESCO removed Bagrati Cathedral from its World Heritage sites in 2017, considering its major reconstruction detrimental to its integrity and authenticity.

Wiki:

Peña de Bernal (in English: Bernal's Boulder or Bernal Peak) is a 433 m (1,421 ft) tall monolith, one of the tallest in the world. Peña de Bernal is located in San Sebastián Bernal, a small town in the Mexican state of Querétaro.

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es.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Sombrerero

  

El Sombrerero es un personaje de la novela Las aventuras de Alicia en el país de las maravillas, del escritor inglés Lewis Carroll. Este personaje también se conoce como el Sombrerero Loco, aunque en la obra de Carroll nunca se le llama así. La confusión probablemente proviene del hecho de que el Gato de Cheshire le advierte a Alicia que el Sombrerero está loco, lo cual se confirma por la conducta excéntrica del Sombrerero. Además, el capítulo donde aparece el Sombrerero se titula "Una merienda de locos". El Sombrerero aparece nuevamente en la secuela de la obra, llamada A través del espejo y lo que Alicia encontró allí, con el nombre Hatta,​ uno de los mensajeros del Rey Blanco.

 

En el programa televisivo Aunque usted no lo crea de Ripley (Believe it or not), de la década de 1980, se hace referencia al personaje del Sombrerero, y se explica que, en la época de Carroll, los sombreros se fabricaban empleando mercurio. Al hacerlo en espacios cerrados, con frecuencia inhalaban los vapores de este metal, lo que provocaba trastornos a la salud (envenenamiento por mercurio) que fácilmente podrían describirse como locura.

 

La fabricación de sombreros era el principal comercio en Stockport, un pueblo cerca de donde creció Carroll, y no era raro ver a los sombrereros parecer perturbados o confundidos. Sin embargo, el Sombrerero no exhibe los síntomas típicos de envenenamiento por mercurio, que incluyen "timidez excesiva, pérdida de confianza en sí mismo, ansiedad y deseo de permanecer inadvertido."​

 

En las ilustraciones se muestra una tarjeta en el sombrero que dice "10/6". Es el precio del sombrero que era diez chelínes y seis peniques. En sistema decimal, equivale a 52½ libras.

 

Versión de Tim Burton

 

Interpretado por Johnny Depp en la película 'Alicia en el país de las maravillas' (2010) de Tim Burton difiere de la versión original del cuento en muchos aspectos. Su nombre real es Tarrant Hightopp, perteneciente al clan Hightopp dedicado a la fabricación de sombreros. Es un hombre muy dulce y alegre que gusta de las fiestas de té. Expresa abiertamente sus emociones. Sus cambiantes estados de ánimo también son literalmente reflejados en sus ojos que varían de color según lo que siente. Incluso las coloridas manchas de su rostro ennegrecen cuando está enfadado. Ha estado esperando ansiosamente el regreso de Alicia, y, según palabras de Alicia, es su más querido y verdadero amigo. Él que cree en ella cuando nadie más lo hace y viceversa. Es intrépido, valiente, noble y leal, capaz de hacer lo imposible por proteger a Alicia aún a riesgo propio. Es habilidoso espadachín e incluso utiliza sus utensilios de costura como armas en la pelea. El Sombrerero Loco antes era el orgulloso fabricante de sombreros de la Reina Blanca, pero el mercurio utilizado en la fabricación de sombreros acabó por envenenarlo, y ahora no está del todo en sus cabales. Esto queda en evidencia en medio de una conversación, donde tiende a perder el hilo de sus ideas y a divagar sin control hasta que alguien le llame la atención. Su locura pasa a convertirse en una especie de doble personalidad que puede tornarse peligrosa si esta entra en ira y, al mismo tiempo, su acento cambia y empieza a hablar en idioma "outlandish". En la secuela llamada Alicia a través del espejo (2016), el sombrerero loco recuerda a su familia, así que decide pedirle ayuda a Alicia (Mia Wasikowska) para ver si ella puede decirle o hacer algo para encontrar a su familia.

 

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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatter_(Alice%27s_Adventures_in_Wonderland)

 

The Hatter is a fictional character in Lewis Carroll's 1865 book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its 1871 sequel Through the Looking-Glass. He is very often referred to as the Mad Hatter, though this term was never used by Carroll. The phrase "mad as a hatter" pre-dates Carroll's works. The Hatter and the March Hare are referred to as "both mad" by the Cheshire Cat, in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in the sixth chapter titled "Pig and Pepper".

 

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

 

The March Hare and the Hatter put the Dormouse's head in a teapot, by Sir John Tenniel.

The Hatter character, alongside all the other fictional beings, first appears in Lewis Carroll's 1865 novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In it, the Hatter explains to Alice that he and the March Hare are always having tea because when he tried to sing for the foul-tempered Queen of Hearts, she sentenced him to death for "murdering the time", but he escapes decapitation. In retaliation, Time (referred to as "he" by the Hatter) halts himself in respect to the Hatter, keeping him stuck at 6:00 pm (or 18:00) forever.

 

When Alice arrives at the tea party, the Hatter is characterised by switching places on the table at any given time, making short, personal remarks, asking unanswerable riddles and reciting nonsensical poetry, all of which eventually drives Alice away. The Hatter appears again as a witness at the Knave of Hearts' trial, where the Queen appears to recognise him as the singer she sentenced to death, and the King of Hearts also cautions him not to be nervous or he will have him "executed on the spot".

 

Through the Looking-Glass

 

The character also appears briefly in Carroll's 1871 Through the Looking-Glass, the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, under the name "Hatta" – alongside the March Hare under the name "Haigha", which is pronounced "hare". Sir John Tenniel's illustration depicts Hatta as sipping from a teacup as he did in the original novel. Alice does not comment on whether Hatta is the Hatter of her earlier dream.

  

Wiki

Fiordland National Park occupies the southwest corner of the South Island of New Zealand. It is the largest of the 14 national parks in New Zealand, with an area of 12,500 km2, and a major part of the Te Wahipounamu World Heritage site.

 

Edit Armin

www.flickr.com/photos/46190123@N02/

Wiki:

Tirana is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Albania.

 

Tirana is located in the center of Albania and is enclosed by mountains and hills with Mount Dajt elevating on the east and a slight valley on the northwest overlooking the Adriatic Sea in the distance. Due to its location within the Plain of Tirana and the close proximity to the Mediterranean Sea, the city is particularly influenced by a Mediterranean seasonal climate. It is among the wettest and sunniest cities in Europe, with 2,544 hours of sun per year.

 

Tirana flourished as a city in 1614 but the region that today corresponds to the city's territory has been continuously inhabited since the Iron Age. The city's territory was inhabited by several Illyrian tribes but had no importance within Illyria. Indeed, it was annexed by Rome and became an integral part of the Roman Empire following the Illyrian Wars.

Wiki:

Tanah Lot is a rock formation off the Indonesian island of Bali. It is home to the pilgrimage temple Pura Tanah Lot (literally "Tanah Lot temple"), a popular tourist and cultural icon for photography and general exoticism.

Wiki:

St. Stephen's Basilica (Hungarian: Szent István-bazilika) is a Roman Catholic basilica in Budapest, Hungary. It is named in honour of Stephen, the first King of Hungary (c 975–1038).

Wiki:

Istiqlal Mosque, or Masjid Istiqlal, (Independence Mosque) in Jakarta, Indonesia is the largest mosque in Southeast Asia. This national mosque of Indonesia was built to commemorate Indonesian independence and named "Istiqlal", an Arabic word for "independence". The mosque was opened to the public 22 February 1978.

Wiki:

St Paul's Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It is the cathedral church of the Diocese of Melbourne and the seat of the Archbishop of Melbourne who is also the metropolitan bishop of the Province of Victoria.

 

The cathedral was built in stages and is one of the City of Melbourne's major landmarks.

Wiki:

Located in central Sydney, the cathedral is one of the city's finest examples of Gothic Revival architecture. Designed by Edmund Blacket, it was ready for services and consecrated in 1868, making it the oldest cathedral in Australia. Joan Kerr described St Andrew's as "a perfect example of the colonial desire to reproduce England in Australia in the mid nineteenth century.

Wiki:

The Church and former monastery of Santo Domingo de Guzmán (Spanish: Templo de Santo Domingo de Guzmán) is a Baroque ecclesiastical building complex in Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico. Construction of it began 1572.

 

Part of Unesco world heritage site "Historic Centre of Oaxaca and Archaeological Site of Monte Albán".

Wiki:

The Royal Exhibition Building is a World Heritage Site-listed building in Melbourne, Australia, completed in 1880. It was built to host the Melbourne International Exhibition in 1880–81 and later hosted (in the Western annex) the opening of the first Parliament of Australia in 1901. Throughout the 20th century smaller sections and wings of the building were subject to demolition and fire; however, the main building, known as the Great Hall, survived.

 

It received restoration throughout the 1990s and in 2004 became the first building in Australia to be awarded UNESCO World Heritage status, being one of the last remaining major 19th-century exhibition buildings in the world. It is the world's most complete surviving site from the International Exhibition movement 1851–1914. It sits adjacent to the Melbourne Museum and is the largest item in Museum Victoria's collection. Today, the building hosts various exhibitions and other events and is closely tied with events at the Melbourne Museum. Architect was Joseph Reed.

 

Edit Armin

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The Monastery of Saint Catherine (Spanish: Santa Catalina) is a monastery of nuns of the Dominican Second Order, located in Arequipa, Peru.

 

It was built in 1579 and was enlarged in the 17th century. The over 20,000-square-meter monastery was built predominantly in the Mudéjar style, and is characterized by its vividly painted walls.

Wiki:

Kota Tua Jakarta ("Jakarta Old Town"), officially known as Kota Tua, is a neighborhood comprising the original downtown area of Jakarta, Indonesia. It is also known as Oud Batavia (Dutch "Old Batavia"), Benedenstad (Dutch "Lower City", contrasting it with Weltevreden, de Bovenstad ("Upper City")), or Kota Lama (Indonesian "Old Town"). Kota Tua is a remainder of Oud Batavia, the first walled settlement of the Dutch in Jakarta area. The area gained importance during the 17th-19th century when it was established as the de facto capital of the Dutch East Indies.

Wiki:

Antibes is a Mediterranean resort in the Alpes-Maritimes department of southeastern France, on the Côte d'Azur between Cannes and Nice.

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Kaikoura is a town on the east coast of the South Island of New Zealand. The Kaikoura Peninsula extends into the sea south of the town, and the resulting upwelling currents bring an abundance of marine life from the depths of the nearby Hikurangi Trench. The town owes its origin to this effect, since it developed as a centre for the whaling industry. The name Kaikoura means 'meal of crayfish' (kai - food/meal, kōura - crayfish) and the crayfish industry still plays a role in the economy of the region. However Kaikoura has now become a popular tourist destination, mainly for whale watching (the sperm whale watching is perhaps the best and most developed in the world) and swimming with or near dolphins.

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The Old Post Office, listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Old Post Office and Clock Tower and located at 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C., was begun in 1892, completed in 1899, and is a contributing property to the Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site.[1] It was used as the city's main General Post Office until 1914 at the beginning of World War I, succeeding an earlier 1839 edifice, G.P.O. of Classical Revival style, expanded in 1866 on F Street, which later was turned over to the Tariff Commission and several other agencies (today, the Hotel Monaco). The Pennsylvania Avenue 1899 landmark structure functioned primarily as a federal office building afterward, and was nearly torn down during the construction of the surrounding Federal Triangle complex in the 1920s. It was again threatened and nearly demolished in the 1970s to make way for proposals for the completion of the enveloping Federal Triangle complex of similar Beaux Arts styled architecture government offices, first begun in the 1920s and 30s.

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Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

Lens: Canon EF24-70mm f/4L IS USM

Focal Length: 27mm

Exposure: 13 Seconds @ F16 ISO 200

 

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The Cathedral Church and Minor Basilica of the Immaculate Mother of God, Help of Christians (colloquially, St Mary's Cathedral) is the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Sydney and the seat of the Archbishop of Sydney.

 

St Mary's has the greatest length of any church in Australia (although it is neither the tallest nor the largest overall). It is located on College Street in the heart of the City of Sydney where, despite the high rise development of the Sydney central business district (CBD), its imposing structure and twin spires make it a landmark from every direction. In 2008, St Mary's Cathedral became the focus of World Youth Day 2008 and was visited by Pope Benedict XVI.

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In the center of Queretaro downtown is the Church of San Francisco, finished at the beginning of the 18th century and from then on the most important in town, serving as the cathedral until the 20th century.

 

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Crummock Water is a lake in the Lake District in Cumbria, North West England situated between Buttermere to the south and Loweswater to the north. Crummock Water is 2.5 miles long, 0.75 mile wide and 140 feet deep.

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San Miguel de Allende is a city and municipality located in the far eastern part of the state of Guanajuato in central Mexico. Historically, the town is important as being the birthplace of Ignacio Allende, whose surname was added to the town’s name in 1826, as well as the first municipality declared independent of Spanish rule by the nascent insurgent army during the Mexican War of Independence.

 

However, the town waned during and after the war, and at the beginning of the 20th century was in danger of becoming a ghost town. Its Baroque/Neoclassical colonial structures were "discovered" by foreign artists who moved in and began art and cultural institutes such as the Instituto Allende and the Escuela de Bellas Artes. This gave the town a reputation, attracting artists such as David Alfaro Siqueiros, who taught painting.

 

This attracted foreign art students, especially former U.S. soldiers studying on the G.I. Bill after the Second World War. Since then, the town has attracted a significant amount of foreign retirees, artists, writers and tourists, which is shifting the area’s economy from agriculture and industry to commerce catering to outside visitors and residents.

 

The main attraction of the town is its well-preserved historic center, filled with buildings from the 17th and 18th centuries. This and the nearby Sanctuary of Atotonilco have been declared World Heritage Sites in 2008.

Per Wiki...Minneopa State Park is a state park in Minnesota, United States. It was established in 1905 to preserve Minneopa Falls, the largest waterfall in southern Minnesota, and was expanded in the 1960s to include the lower reaches of Minneopa Creek and a large tract of prairie. Minneopa is Minnesota's third oldest state park, after Itasca and Interstate. Two park resources are listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the 1862 Seppman Mill and a district of seven Rustic Style structures built by the Works Progress Administration in the late 1930s. The park is located almost entirely on the south side of the Minnesota River, 3 miles (4.8 km) west of Mankato. In 2015 the state reintroduced American bison to the park in a 330-acre fenced enclosure, which visitors can drive through in their vehicles.

 

The creek cascades about 6 or 7 feet (2 m) over the upper falls and flows 66 feet (20 m) before dropping over the 39-foot (12 m) lower falls. The name is a shortening of Minneinneopa, which is translated from the Dakota language as "water falling twice." Other translations have been given as "water of two falls" and "water of the dancing elk." Although Minneopa Falls is often referred to as the highest waterfall in southern Minnesota, Minnemishinona Falls in a nearby Nicollet County park is slightly higher at 42 feet (13 m) but is not as scenic or well-known. Lower Minneopa Falls can be called the region's largest, as it is 25 feet (7.6 m) wide while Minnemishinona spans only 10 feet (3.0 m)

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The Biblioteca Palafoxiana is the first public library in the Americas. Founded by Bishop Juan de Palafox y Mendoza in 1646.

 

The Biblioteca Palafoxiana owes its name and foundation to Juan de Palafox y Mendoza, bishop of Puebla. He was a lover of books, and is quoted as having said,

 

"He who succeeds without books is in an inconsolable darkness, on a mountain without company, on a path without a crosier, in darkness without a guide."

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The Church and former monastery of Santo Domingo de Guzmán (Spanish: Templo de Santo Domingo de Guzmán) is a Baroque ecclesiastical building complex in Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico. The complex includes a substantial sanctuary and an extensive system of courtyards, cloisters and rooms that formerly constituted the monastery. As its name implies, the church and monastery were founded by the Dominican Order. Begun in 1575, they were constructed over a period of 200 years, between the 16th and 18th centuries. The monastery was active from 1608 to 1857. In the period of the revolutionary wars, the buildings were turned over to military use, and from 1866 to 1902 they served as a barracks. The church was restored to religious use in 1938, but the monastery was made available to the Universidad Autónoma Benito Juárez de Oaxaca. In 1972 it became a regional museum, and in 1993 the decision was taken to undertake a full restoration. This was completed in 1999. It is an exceptional example of conservation architecture. The architect responsible was Juan Urquiaga.

 

The church has also been fully restored. Its highly decorated interior includes use of more than 60,000 sheets of 23.5-karat gold leaf.

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La Boca is a neighborhood, or barrio of the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires. It retains a strong European flavour, with many of its early settlers being from the Italian city of Genoa. In fact the name has a strong assonance with the Genoese neighborhood of Boccadasse (or Bocadaze in Genoese dialect), and some people Believe that the Buenos Aires barrio was indeed named after it. The conventional explanation is that the neighborhood sits at the mouth ("boca" in Spanish) of the Riachuelo.

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The Australian green tree frog, simply green tree frog in Australia, White's tree frog, or dumpy tree frog (Litoria caerulea) is a species of tree frog native to Australia and New Guinea, with introduced populations in the United States and New Zealand, though the latter is believed to have died out. The species belongs to the genus Litoria. It is morphologically similar to some other members of the genus, particularly the magnificent tree frog (L. splendida) and the white-lipped tree frog (L. infrafrenata).

 

Larger than most Australian frogs, the Australian green tree frog reaches 10 cm (4 in) or more in length. Its average lifespan in captivity, about 16 years, is long compared with most frogs. Docile and well suited to living near human dwellings, Australian green tree frogs are often found on window sills or inside houses, eating insects drawn by the light. The green tree frog screams when it is in danger to scare off its foe, and squeaks when it is touched.

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The Holy Trinity Cathedral of Tbilisi commonly known as Sameba is the main cathedral of the Georgian Orthodox Church located in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. Constructed between 1995 and 2004, it is the third-tallest Eastern Orthodox cathedral in the world and one of the largest religious buildings in the world by total area. Sameba is a synthesis of traditional styles dominating the Georgian church architecture at various stages in history and has some Byzantine undertones.

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The Basilica Cathedral of Lima is a Roman Catholic cathedral located in the Plaza Mayor of downtown Lima, Peru. Construction began in 1535, and the building has undergone many reconstructions and transformations since. It retains its colonial structure and facade.

 

Thanks for fine tuning colours Armin.

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The Arles Amphitheatre (French: Arènes d'Arles) is a Roman amphitheatre in the southern French town of Arles. This two-tiered Roman amphitheatre is probably the most prominent tourist attraction in the city of Arles, which thrived in Roman times. The pronounced towers jutting out from the top are medieval add-ons.

 

Built in 90 AD, the amphitheatre was capable of seating over 20,000 spectators, and was built to provide entertainment in the form of chariot races and bloody hand-to-hand battles. Today, it draws large crowds for bullfighting during the Feria d'Arles as well as plays and concerts in summer.

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